housekeeper


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house·keep·er

 (hous′kē′pər)
n.
1. One who is employed to perform or direct the domestic tasks in a household.
2. A housewife or househusband.
3. An employee of an establishment, such as a hospital, inn, or hotel, who performs or coordinates housekeeping tasks.

housekeeper

(ˈhaʊsˌkiːpə)
n
1. (Commerce) a person, esp a woman, employed to run a household
2. bad housekeeper a person who is not an efficient and thrifty domestic manager
3. good housekeeper a person who is an efficient and thrifty domestic manager

house•keep•er

(ˈhaʊsˌki pər)

n.
1. a person, often hired, who does or directs the domestic work and planning necessary for a home, as housecleaning or buying food.
2. an employee of a hotel, hospital, etc., who supervises the cleaning staff.
[1375–1425]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.housekeeper - a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a householdhousekeeper - a servant who is employed to perform domestic task in a household
domestic, domestic help, house servant - a servant who is paid to perform menial tasks around the household
Translations
مُدَبِّرَة شؤون البيْت
domovník-ice
husholderske
házvezetõ
ráîskona
hišnicahišnik

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊsˌkiːpəʳ] Nama f de llaves; (in hotel) → gobernanta f

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊskiːpər] ngouvernante f

housekeeper

[ˈhaʊsˌkiːpəʳ] ngovernante f

house

(haus) plural houses (ˈhauziz) noun
1. a building in which people, especially a single family, live. Houses have been built on the outskirts of the town for the workers in the new industrial estate.
2. a place or building used for a particular purpose. a hen-house; a public house.
3. a theatre, or the audience in a theatre. There was a full house for the first night of the play.
4. a family, usually important or noble, including its ancestors and descendants. the house of David.
(hauz) verb
1. to provide with a house, accommodation or shelter. All these people will have to be housed; The animals are housed in the barn.
2. to store or keep somewhere. The electric generator is housed in the garage.
ˈhousing (-ziŋ) noun
1. houses. These flats will provide housing for the immigrants.
2. the hard cover round a machine etc.
ˈhousing benefit noun
a payment given by a government to people who are entitled to it according to certain criteria (eg poverty) when they buy or rent a house, an apartment etc.
house agent (American ˈreal-estate agent)
a person who arranges the sale or letting of houses.
house arrest
a type of arrest in which a person is not allowed to leave his own house. He was kept under house arrest.
ˈhouseboat noun
a type of boat, usually with a flat bottom, which is built to be lived in.
ˈhousebreaker noun
a person who breaks into a house in order to steal.
ˈhousebreaking noun
ˈhouse-fly noun
the common fly, found throughout the world.
ˈhousehold noun
the people who live together in a house, including their servants. How many people are there in this household?
ˈhouseholder noun
the person who owns a house or pays the rent for it.
household word
something which is well-known to everyone. His name is a household word throughout the country.
ˈhousekeeper noun
a person, usually a woman, who is paid to look after the management of a house.
ˈhousekeeping noun
the management of a house.
ˈhouseman noun
a recently qualified doctor who is living in a hospital while working there to complete his training.
ˈhousetrain verb
to train (a dog, cat etc) to be clean inside the house.
ˈhouse-warming noun
a party given after moving into a new house.
adjective
a house-warming party.
ˈhousewife nounplural ˈhousewives
a woman who looks after her house, her husband and her family, and who usually does not have a job outside the home.
ˈhousework noun
the work of keeping a house clean and tidy. My mother has a woman to help her with the housework.
like a house on fire
1. very well. The two children got on with each other like a house on fire.
2. very quickly. I'm getting through this job like a house on fire.
References in classic literature ?
Miss Meg is going to make a proper good housekeeper.
Mary Dusak had been housekeeper for a bachelor rancher from Boston, and after several years in his service she was forced to retire from the world for a short time.
She is a perfect and enthusiastic housekeeper, and hopes for no better profession.
She was now housekeeper and was also acting for the time as superintendent to the little girl, of whom, without children of her own, she was, by good luck, extremely fond.
and when I go to the houses one wants a leg of mutton for an early dinner and I must be back with it in a quarter of an hour; another cook has forgotten to order the beef; I must go and fetch it and be back in no time, or the mistress will scold; and the housekeeper says they have company coming unexpectedly and must have some chops sent up directly; and the lady at No.
You don't know, and you can't, the daily, hourly trials that beset a housekeeper from them, everywhere and every way.
I saw that she was a good housekeeper, for while she talked she kept a corner of her eye on the servants to see that they made no balks in handling the body and getting it out; when they came with fresh clean towels, she sent back for the other kind; and when they had finished wiping the floor and were going, she indicated a crimson fleck the size of a tear which their duller eyes had overlooked.
Elton, I must beg leave to stop at your house, and ask your housekeeper for a bit of ribband or string, or any thing just to keep my boot on.
The late owner of this estate was a single man, who lived to a very advanced age, and who for many years of his life, had a constant companion and housekeeper in his sister.
It was the fifteenth of January, about nine o'clock in the morning: Bessie was gone down to breakfast; my cousins had not yet been summoned to their mama; Eliza was putting on her bonnet and warm garden-coat to go and feed her poultry, an occupation of which she was fond: and not less so of selling the eggs to the housekeeper and hoarding up the money she thus obtained.
I dine between twelve and one o'clock; the housekeeper, a matronly lady, taken as a fixture along with the house, could not, or would not, comprehend my request that I might be served at five) - on mounting the stairs with this lazy intention, and stepping into the room, I saw a servant-girl on her knees surrounded by brushes and coal-scuttles, and raising an infernal dust as she extinguished the flames with heaps of cinders.
Lecount's name; she is evidently sharp enough to distrust the housekeeper already.