housewife


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Related to housewife: househusband

house·wife

 (hous′wīf′)
n. pl. house·wives (-wīvz′)
1. A married woman who manages the household as her main occupation and whose spouse usually earns the family income.
2. (hŭz′ĭf) A small container for needles, thread, and other sewing equipment.

[Middle English houswif : hous, house; see house + wif, wife; see wife.]

housewife

(ˈhaʊsˌwaɪf)
n, pl -wives
1. (Sociology) a woman, typically a married woman, who keeps house, usually without having paid employment
2. (Military) chiefly Also called: hussy, huswife or hussif Brit a small sewing kit issued to soldiers
housewifery n

house•wife

(ˈhaʊsˌwaɪf or, usu., ˈhʌz ɪf for 2 )

n., pl. -wives (-ˌwaɪvz or, usu., -ɪfs or -ɪvz for 2 )
1. a married woman who manages her own household, esp. as her principal occupation.
2. Brit. a small case for sewing articles.
[1175–1225]
house′wif`ey, adj.
usage: housewife is regarded by some as offensive, perhaps because it implies a lowly status or perhaps because it defines a woman's occupation in relation to a man. Homemaker is a common substitute.

housewife

homemaker
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.housewife - a wife who manages a household while her husband earns the family incomehousewife - a wife who manages a household while her husband earns the family income
married woman, wife - a married woman; a man's partner in marriage
Translations
رَبَّةُ الـمَنْزِلُربَّة مَنْزِل
paní domužena v domácnosti
hjemmegående husmorhusmor
kotirouva
domaćica
húsmóîir
主婦
주부
dona de casadona-de-casa
pani domu
gospodinja
hemmafru
แม่บ้าน
ev kadını/hanımıevkadını
bà nội trợ

housewife

[ˈhaʊswaɪf] N (housewives (pl)) → ama f de casa

housewife

[ˈhaʊswaɪf] n
(= woman who does housework) → ménagère f
(= woman who does not work outside the home) → femme f au foyer
She's a housewife → Elle est femme au foyer.house wine ncuvée f du patron

housewife

[ˈhaʊsˌwaɪf] n (-wives (pl)) → massaia, casalinga

house

(haus) plural houses (ˈhauziz) noun
1. a building in which people, especially a single family, live. Houses have been built on the outskirts of the town for the workers in the new industrial estate.
2. a place or building used for a particular purpose. a hen-house; a public house.
3. a theatre, or the audience in a theatre. There was a full house for the first night of the play.
4. a family, usually important or noble, including its ancestors and descendants. the house of David.
(hauz) verb
1. to provide with a house, accommodation or shelter. All these people will have to be housed; The animals are housed in the barn.
2. to store or keep somewhere. The electric generator is housed in the garage.
ˈhousing (-ziŋ) noun
1. houses. These flats will provide housing for the immigrants.
2. the hard cover round a machine etc.
ˈhousing benefit noun
a payment given by a government to people who are entitled to it according to certain criteria (eg poverty) when they buy or rent a house, an apartment etc.
house agent (American ˈreal-estate agent)
a person who arranges the sale or letting of houses.
house arrest
a type of arrest in which a person is not allowed to leave his own house. He was kept under house arrest.
ˈhouseboat noun
a type of boat, usually with a flat bottom, which is built to be lived in.
ˈhousebreaker noun
a person who breaks into a house in order to steal.
ˈhousebreaking noun
ˈhouse-fly noun
the common fly, found throughout the world.
ˈhousehold noun
the people who live together in a house, including their servants. How many people are there in this household?
ˈhouseholder noun
the person who owns a house or pays the rent for it.
household word
something which is well-known to everyone. His name is a household word throughout the country.
ˈhousekeeper noun
a person, usually a woman, who is paid to look after the management of a house.
ˈhousekeeping noun
the management of a house.
ˈhouseman noun
a recently qualified doctor who is living in a hospital while working there to complete his training.
ˈhousetrain verb
to train (a dog, cat etc) to be clean inside the house.
ˈhouse-warming noun
a party given after moving into a new house.
adjective
a house-warming party.
ˈhousewife nounplural ˈhousewives
a woman who looks after her house, her husband and her family, and who usually does not have a job outside the home.
ˈhousework noun
the work of keeping a house clean and tidy. My mother has a woman to help her with the housework.
like a house on fire
1. very well. The two children got on with each other like a house on fire.
2. very quickly. I'm getting through this job like a house on fire.

housewife

رَبَّةُ الـمَنْزِلُ žena v domácnosti hjemmegående husmor Hausfrau νοικοκυρά ama de casa kotirouva femme au foyer domaćica casalinga 主婦 주부 huisvrouw husmor gospodyni domowa dona de casa домохозяйка hemmafru แม่บ้าน evkadını bà nội trợ 家庭主妇

housewife

n. ama de casa, madre de familia.

housewife

n (pl -wives) ama de casa
References in classic literature ?
With her pretty hair tucked into a little cap, arms bared to the elbow, and a checked apron which had a coquettish look in spite of the bib, the young housewife fell to work, feeling no doubts about her success, for hadn't she seen Hannah do it hundreds of times?
Shimerda was a good housewife in her own country, but she managed poorly under new conditions: the conditions were bad enough, certainly!
A round, bustling, fire-ruddy housewife of the neighborhood burst breathless into the shop, fiercely demanding yeast; and when the poor gentlewoman, with her cold shyness of manner, gave her hot customer to understand that she did not keep the article, this very capable housewife took upon herself to administer a regular rebuke.
Possibly I had conjured up impossible dangers, like some nervous old housewife, and when I should catch up with Powell would get a good laugh for my pains.
Coquenard distributed this dish to the young men with the moderation of a good housewife.
The mirror still continued the great object of desire, particularly in the eyes of the old housewife, who produced a pot of parched flour and a string of biscuit roots.
The elder inhabitants pished and pshawed a little at the folly of the new shopkeeper in venturing on such an outlay in goods that would not keep; to be sure, Christmas was coming, but what housewife in Grimworth would not think shame to furnish forth her table with articles that were not home-cooked?
No sooner had this little plan shaped itself in his mind than he began to be busy with exact calculations about the wood to be bought and the particular article of furniture that should be undertaken first--a kitchen cupboard of his own contrivance, with such an ingenious arrangement of sliding-doors and bolts, such convenient nooks for stowing household provender, and such a symmetrical result to the eye, that every good housewife would be in raptures with it, and fall through all the gradations of melancholy longing till her husband promised to buy it for her.
The mother of the latter was the mistress of the family, and a notable housewife, and a most industrious old lady she was.
Now, little housewife," said my guardian, looking at his watch, "I was strictly timed before I came upstairs, for you must not be tired too soon; and my time has waned away to the last minute.
It was in vain urged by the housewife that God made yeast, as well as dough, and loves fermentation just as dearly as he loves vegetation; that fermentation develops the saccharine element in the grain, and makes it more palatable and more digestible.
But when Stroeve spoke of Chardin it was not without reason, and she reminded me curiously of that pleasant housewife in her mob-cap and apron whom the great painter has immortalised.