housewifey

housewifey

(ˈhaʊsˌwaɪfɪ)
adj
suitable for or typical of a housewife
References in periodicals archive ?
She said: "I've been doing housewifey things and looking after the children, who are being very protective of their mum
BRAD PITT (right) And while we're thinking housewifey wecouldn't do better than Brad Pitt as our man to bring home the bacon.
For viewers who never tuned in to the MTV show - and there will be many among the midday KTLA audience - it was clear this was not another quaint, housewifey show.
By noon we had a pile of what we'd salvaged, among the rubble an old crock-pot, one of my mother's fond housewifey implements.
When Cline arrived on the country music scene in the late 1950s -- when it was still called "hillbilly" -- there was only one other woman: Kitty Wells, who had something of a housewifey image.
She wasn't a flapper or a hussy, she wasn't a meek little housewifey blob, she wasn't a schoolmarm or a virgin battle-ax--but somehow a bit of all of them, which meant that you could never quite pin her down or predict what person she was going to be next.
It sounds trite and housewifey, but if we can teach Americans how to feed their kids right, 30 years from now those kids will be able to avoid heart disease and the other conditions that are plaguing us now.
JERRY HALL: "I quite like the idea of getting married, but I certainly don't want to be housewifey and cook and do all that stuff.
According to Blackwell, the music star should quit wearing underwear as outerwear, forget the housewifey look and make the ``Evita'' look her own.