housewife

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house·wife

 (hous′wīf′)
n. pl. house·wives (-wīvz′)
1. A married woman who manages the household as her main occupation and whose spouse usually earns the family income.
2. (hŭz′ĭf) A small container for needles, thread, and other sewing equipment.

[Middle English houswif : hous, house; see house + wif, wife; see wife.]

housewife

(ˈhaʊsˌwaɪf)
n, pl -wives
1. (Sociology) a woman, typically a married woman, who keeps house, usually without having paid employment
2. (Military) chiefly Also called: hussy, huswife or hussif Brit a small sewing kit issued to soldiers
housewifery n

house•wife

(ˈhaʊsˌwaɪf or, usu., ˈhʌz ɪf for 2 )

n., pl. -wives (-ˌwaɪvz or, usu., -ɪfs or -ɪvz for 2 )
1. a married woman who manages her own household, esp. as her principal occupation.
2. Brit. a small case for sewing articles.
[1175–1225]
house′wif`ey, adj.
usage: housewife is regarded by some as offensive, perhaps because it implies a lowly status or perhaps because it defines a woman's occupation in relation to a man. Homemaker is a common substitute.

housewife

homemaker
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.housewife - a wife who manages a household while her husband earns the family incomehousewife - a wife who manages a household while her husband earns the family income
married woman, wife - a married woman; a man's partner in marriage
Translations
رَبَّةُ الـمَنْزِلُربَّة مَنْزِل
paní domužena v domácnosti
hjemmegående husmorhusmor
kotirouva
domaćica
húsmóîir
主婦
주부
dona de casadona-de-casa
pani domu
gospodinja
hemmafru
แม่บ้าน
ev kadını/hanımıevkadını
bà nội trợ

housewife

[ˈhaʊswaɪf] N (housewives (pl)) → ama f de casa

housewife

[ˈhaʊswaɪf] n
(= woman who does housework) → ménagère f
(= woman who does not work outside the home) → femme f au foyer
She's a housewife → Elle est femme au foyer.house wine ncuvée f du patron

housewife

[ˈhaʊsˌwaɪf] n (-wives (pl)) → massaia, casalinga

house

(haus) plural houses (ˈhauziz) noun
1. a building in which people, especially a single family, live. Houses have been built on the outskirts of the town for the workers in the new industrial estate.
2. a place or building used for a particular purpose. a hen-house; a public house.
3. a theatre, or the audience in a theatre. There was a full house for the first night of the play.
4. a family, usually important or noble, including its ancestors and descendants. the house of David.
(hauz) verb
1. to provide with a house, accommodation or shelter. All these people will have to be housed; The animals are housed in the barn.
2. to store or keep somewhere. The electric generator is housed in the garage.
ˈhousing (-ziŋ) noun
1. houses. These flats will provide housing for the immigrants.
2. the hard cover round a machine etc.
ˈhousing benefit noun
a payment given by a government to people who are entitled to it according to certain criteria (eg poverty) when they buy or rent a house, an apartment etc.
house agent (American ˈreal-estate agent)
a person who arranges the sale or letting of houses.
house arrest
a type of arrest in which a person is not allowed to leave his own house. He was kept under house arrest.
ˈhouseboat noun
a type of boat, usually with a flat bottom, which is built to be lived in.
ˈhousebreaker noun
a person who breaks into a house in order to steal.
ˈhousebreaking noun
ˈhouse-fly noun
the common fly, found throughout the world.
ˈhousehold noun
the people who live together in a house, including their servants. How many people are there in this household?
ˈhouseholder noun
the person who owns a house or pays the rent for it.
household word
something which is well-known to everyone. His name is a household word throughout the country.
ˈhousekeeper noun
a person, usually a woman, who is paid to look after the management of a house.
ˈhousekeeping noun
the management of a house.
ˈhouseman noun
a recently qualified doctor who is living in a hospital while working there to complete his training.
ˈhousetrain verb
to train (a dog, cat etc) to be clean inside the house.
ˈhouse-warming noun
a party given after moving into a new house.
adjective
a house-warming party.
ˈhousewife nounplural ˈhousewives
a woman who looks after her house, her husband and her family, and who usually does not have a job outside the home.
ˈhousework noun
the work of keeping a house clean and tidy. My mother has a woman to help her with the housework.
like a house on fire
1. very well. The two children got on with each other like a house on fire.
2. very quickly. I'm getting through this job like a house on fire.

housewife

رَبَّةُ الـمَنْزِلُ žena v domácnosti hjemmegående husmor Hausfrau νοικοκυρά ama de casa kotirouva femme au foyer domaćica casalinga 主婦 주부 huisvrouw husmor gospodyni domowa dona de casa домохозяйка hemmafru แม่บ้าน evkadını bà nội trợ 家庭主妇

housewife

n. ama de casa, madre de familia.

housewife

n (pl -wives) ama de casa
References in classic literature ?
The Aged Man was about to speak further, but the meeting informally adjourned in order to sweep the floor of the temple - for the men of Gakwak are the tidiest housewives in all that province.
Indeed, if by virtue these writers mean the exercise of those cardinal virtues, which like good housewives stay at home, and mind only the business of their own family, I shall very readily concede the point; for so surely do all these contribute and lead to happiness, that I could almost wish, in violation of all the antient and modern sages, to call them rather by the name of wisdom, than by that of virtue; for, with regard to this life, no system, I conceive, was ever wiser than that of the antient Epicureans, who held this wisdom to constitute the chief good; nor foolisher than that of their opposites, those modern epicures, who place all felicity in the abundant gratification of every sensual appetite.
For half a century the housewives of Pont-l'Eveque had envied Madame Aubain her servant Felicite.
They were not exactly popular favorites, but they did receive certain undesirable morsels from the more charitable housewives.
I commend then peculiar mode of proceeding to the consideration of all butchers, cooks, and housewives.
This name was given, we are told, in former days, by the good housewives of the adjacent country, from the inveterate propensity of their husbands to linger about the village tavern on market days.
When school hours were over, he was even the companion and playmate of the larger boys; and on holiday afternoons would convoy some of the smaller ones home, who happened to have pretty sisters, or good housewives for mothers, noted for the comforts of the cupboard.
A stately squadron of snowy geese were riding in an adjoining pond, convoying whole fleets of ducks; regiments of turkeys were gobbling through the farmyard, and Guinea fowls fretting about it, like ill-tempered housewives, with their peevish, discontented cry.
She described a typical night in the Bush household: 'Nine o'clock and Mr Excitement here is in bed and I am watching Desperate Housewives.
All that pales next to his current success as creator and executive producer of ABC's Sunday night phenomenon Desperate Housewives.
Objective: To compare awareness of osteoporosis and its associated risks among working women and housewives.
Summary: The role of housewives is particularly important and their level of their safety consciousness needs to be raised