hove


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Related to hove: hove into view

hove

 (hōv)
v.
v.tr.
Past tense and past participle of heave.
v.intr.
Past tense and past participle of heave.

hove

(həʊv)
vb
chiefly nautical a past tense and past participle of heave

Hove

(həʊv)
n
(Placename) a town and coastal resort in S England, in Brighton and Hove unitary authority, East Sussex. Pop: 72 335 (2001)

heave

(hiv)

v. heaved (esp. Naut.) hove; heav•ing; v.t.
1. to raise or lift with effort or force; hoist: to heave a heavy ax.
2. to throw, esp. to lift and throw with effort or force: to heave a stone through a window.
3. Naut. to move into a certain position or situation.
4. to utter laboriously or painfully: to heave a sigh.
5. to cause to rise and fall with a swelling motion: to heave one's chest.
6. to vomit; throw up.
7. to haul or pull on (a rope, cable, line, etc.).
v.i.
8. to rise and fall in rhythmically alternate movements: The ship heaved and rolled.
9. to breathe with effort; pant.
10. to vomit; retch.
11. to rise as if thrust up, as a hill; swell or bulge.
12. to pull or haul on a rope, cable, etc.
13. Naut. to move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation: The ship hove into sight.
14. heave to,
a. to stop the headway of (a vessel), esp. by bringing the head to the wind and trimming the sails.
b. to come to a halt.
n.
15. an act or effort of heaving.
16. a throw, toss, or cast.
17. the horizontal component of the apparent displacement resulting from a geologic fault, measured in a vertical plane perpendicular to the strike.
18. the rise and fall of the waves or swell of a sea.
19. heaves, (used with a sing. v.) Also called broken wind. a disease of horses characterized by difficult breathing.
Idioms:
heave ho! (an exclamation used by sailors, as when heaving the anchor up.)
[before 900; Middle English heven, variant (with -v- from preterit and past participle) of hebben, Old English hebban, c. Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German heffen, Old Norse hefja, Gothic hafjan]
heav′er, n.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
roared the captain, as a Portuguese pirate hove in sight, with a flag black as ink flying from her foremast.
He laid into his work like a nigger, and the way he hove acorns into that hole for about two hours and a half was one of the most exciting and astonishing spectacles I ever struck.
Pap was agoing on so he never noticed where his old limber legs was taking him to, so he went head over heels over the tub of salt pork and barked both shins, and the rest of his speech was all the hottest kind of language -- mostly hove at the nigger and the gov- ment, though he give the tub some, too, all along, here and there.
Ben Rogers hove in sight presently -- the very boy, of all boys, whose ridicule he had been dreading.
Marian had not yet had time to change her page's attire, when the three escorts of the knight hove in sight.
THAT night land was sighted after sundown, and the schooner hove to.
I had mustered all hands and was exercising candles, when you hove in sight; but when the women heard your bells they started an end, as if they were riding the boat swain’s colt; and if-so-be there is that man in the house who can bring up a parcel of women when they have got headway on them, until they’ve run out the end of their rope, his name is not Benjamin Pump.
He had no time to protest, but was hove inboard and treated like "Pennsylvania.
Kim danced with impatience when the slim young Kayeth hove in sight.
He will be rather impatient to get back to his champagne, from which he ran away in such a hurry, when the convict with the gun hove in sight.
At length the vessel hove in sight of the town of Zanzibar, upon the island of the same name, and, on the 15th of April, at 11 o'clock in the morning, she anchored in the port.
After luncheon they went to Hove to see the woman who was to take charge of the baby.