hove


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Related to hove: hove into view

hove

 (hōv)
v.
v.tr.
Past tense and past participle of heave.
v.intr.
Past tense and past participle of heave.

hove

(həʊv)
vb
chiefly nautical a past tense and past participle of heave

Hove

(həʊv)
n
(Placename) a town and coastal resort in S England, in Brighton and Hove unitary authority, East Sussex. Pop: 72 335 (2001)

heave

(hiv)

v. heaved (esp. Naut.) hove; heav•ing; v.t.
1. to raise or lift with effort or force; hoist: to heave a heavy ax.
2. to throw, esp. to lift and throw with effort or force: to heave a stone through a window.
3. Naut. to move into a certain position or situation.
4. to utter laboriously or painfully: to heave a sigh.
5. to cause to rise and fall with a swelling motion: to heave one's chest.
6. to vomit; throw up.
7. to haul or pull on (a rope, cable, line, etc.).
v.i.
8. to rise and fall in rhythmically alternate movements: The ship heaved and rolled.
9. to breathe with effort; pant.
10. to vomit; retch.
11. to rise as if thrust up, as a hill; swell or bulge.
12. to pull or haul on a rope, cable, etc.
13. Naut. to move in a certain direction or into a certain position or situation: The ship hove into sight.
14. heave to,
a. to stop the headway of (a vessel), esp. by bringing the head to the wind and trimming the sails.
b. to come to a halt.
n.
15. an act or effort of heaving.
16. a throw, toss, or cast.
17. the horizontal component of the apparent displacement resulting from a geologic fault, measured in a vertical plane perpendicular to the strike.
18. the rise and fall of the waves or swell of a sea.
19. heaves, (used with a sing. v.) Also called broken wind. a disease of horses characterized by difficult breathing.
Idioms:
heave ho! (an exclamation used by sailors, as when heaving the anchor up.)
[before 900; Middle English heven, variant (with -v- from preterit and past participle) of hebben, Old English hebban, c. Old Saxon hebbian, Old High German heffen, Old Norse hefja, Gothic hafjan]
heav′er, n.
Translations
References in classic literature ?
Las' time I did, he jest took an' hove a boot at me.
No sooner were the tubs furnished than Tom Platt and Long Jack, who had been exploring the inside of a dory with a lantern, snatched them away, loaded up the tubs and some small, painted trawl-buoys, and hove the boat overboard into what Harvey regarded as an exceedingly rough sea.
Unluckily, however, she "broached to," and was struck by a heavy sea, that hove her on her beam-ends.
Despite the fact that by his manoeuvre the Arangi had been hove to, he knew that windage and sea-driftage would quickly send her away from the swimming puppy.
He laid into his work like a nigger, and the way he hove acorns into that hole for about two hours and a half was one of the most exciting and astonishing spectacles I ever struck.
Obviously there are certain pressures on our kennel strength at the moment [following the departure of Jim Reynolds]," said O'Dowd, "while Peter Miller at Hove said he has greyhounds struggling for runs just now.
However, the average house price in the most popular postal district of BN3 is BPS33,972 lower than in Hove.
Bowie and Walsh first approached him in the spring of 2014 when they decided thev wanted a director who was, as van Hove puts it, "a little more adventurous.
Hove, a multi-talented writer, started off as a poet.
During the later raids in October 2012 police searched a house in Topaz Close, Fartown, which was linked to Hove, and recovered "a bag of cheques", printers and a computer containing cheque security details.
Brighton and Hove Police posted: "Localised flooding in Hove and Portslade, some roads not passable.
It caused delays to journeys between Worthing and Hove and Brighton.