huckster


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Financial, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

huck·ster

 (hŭk′stər)
n.
1. One who sells wares or provisions in the street; a peddler or hawker.
2. One who uses aggressive, showy, and sometimes devious methods to promote or sell a product.
3. Informal One who writes advertising copy, especially for radio or television.
v. huck·stered, huck·ster·ing, huck·sters
v.tr.
1. To sell; peddle.
2. To promote or attempt to sell (a commercial product, for example) in an overaggressive or showy manner.
3. To haggle over; deal in.
v.intr.
To sell or promote something.

[Middle English, probably of Low German origin; akin to Middle Dutch hokester.]

huck′ster·ism n.

huckster

(ˈhʌkstə)
n
1. (Commerce) a person who uses aggressive or questionable methods of selling
2. (Commerce) rare a person who sells small articles or fruit in the street
3. (Broadcasting) US a person who writes for radio or television advertisements
vb
4. (tr) to peddle
5. (Commerce) (tr) to sell or advertise aggressively or questionably
6. to haggle (over)
[C12: perhaps from Middle Dutch hoekster, from hoeken to carry on the back]
ˈhucksterism n

huck•ster

(ˈhʌk stər)
n.
1. an aggressive seller or promoter, esp. one who uses showy or dubious methods.
2. a person whose business is advertising, esp. radio and television advertising.
3. a peddler of small items, esp. fruits and vegetables; hawker.
v.i.
4. to make petty bargains; haggle.
5. to deal in small items; peddle.
v.t.
6. to sell or promote, esp. in an aggressive and flashy manner.
[1150–1200; Middle English huccstere=hucc- haggle (c. dial. German hucken to huckster) + -stere -ster]
huck′ster•ism, n.

huckster


Past participle: huckstered
Gerund: huckstering

Imperative
huckster
huckster
Present
I huckster
you huckster
he/she/it hucksters
we huckster
you huckster
they huckster
Preterite
I huckstered
you huckstered
he/she/it huckstered
we huckstered
you huckstered
they huckstered
Present Continuous
I am huckstering
you are huckstering
he/she/it is huckstering
we are huckstering
you are huckstering
they are huckstering
Present Perfect
I have huckstered
you have huckstered
he/she/it has huckstered
we have huckstered
you have huckstered
they have huckstered
Past Continuous
I was huckstering
you were huckstering
he/she/it was huckstering
we were huckstering
you were huckstering
they were huckstering
Past Perfect
I had huckstered
you had huckstered
he/she/it had huckstered
we had huckstered
you had huckstered
they had huckstered
Future
I will huckster
you will huckster
he/she/it will huckster
we will huckster
you will huckster
they will huckster
Future Perfect
I will have huckstered
you will have huckstered
he/she/it will have huckstered
we will have huckstered
you will have huckstered
they will have huckstered
Future Continuous
I will be huckstering
you will be huckstering
he/she/it will be huckstering
we will be huckstering
you will be huckstering
they will be huckstering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been huckstering
you have been huckstering
he/she/it has been huckstering
we have been huckstering
you have been huckstering
they have been huckstering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been huckstering
you will have been huckstering
he/she/it will have been huckstering
we will have been huckstering
you will have been huckstering
they will have been huckstering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been huckstering
you had been huckstering
he/she/it had been huckstering
we had been huckstering
you had been huckstering
they had been huckstering
Conditional
I would huckster
you would huckster
he/she/it would huckster
we would huckster
you would huckster
they would huckster
Past Conditional
I would have huckstered
you would have huckstered
he/she/it would have huckstered
we would have huckstered
you would have huckstered
they would have huckstered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.huckster - a seller of shoddy goods
marketer, seller, trafficker, vender, vendor - someone who promotes or exchanges goods or services for money
2.huckster - a person who writes radio or tv advertisements
adman, advertiser, advertizer - someone whose business is advertising
Verb1.huckster - sell or offer for sale from place to placehuckster - sell or offer for sale from place to place
sell, trade, deal - do business; offer for sale as for one's livelihood; "She deals in gold"; "The brothers sell shoes"
2.huckster - wrangle (over a price, terms of an agreement, etc.); "Let's not haggle over a few dollars"
bargain down, beat down - persuade the seller to accept a lower price; "She beat the merchant down $100"
bargain, dicker - negotiate the terms of an exchange; "We bargained for a beautiful rug in the bazaar"

huckster

verb
1. To travel about selling goods:
2. To argue about the terms, as of a sale:
Translations

huckster

[ˈhʌkstəʳ] N (US) → vendedor m ambulante, buhonero m

huckster

[ˈhʌkstər] n (US)mercanti m

huckster

n
(= hawker)Straßenhändler(in) m(f)
(US inf) → Reklamefritze m (inf)
References in classic literature ?
Beyond all question, he had the blood of a petty huckster in his veins, through whatever channel it may have found its way there.
The old man was overjoyed, and pulled out his money en masse; whereupon the huckster loaded him with our common library.
And the woman I love knows that I began my career with an act of low dishonesty, that I built up my life upon sands of shame - that I sold, like a common huckster, the secret that had been intrusted to me as a man of honour.
said Kim, mechanically following the huckster instinct of the East.
The village had formerly contained, side by side with the argicultural labourers, an interesting and better-informed class, ranking distinctly above the former--the class to which Tess's father and mother had belonged--and including the carpenter, the smith, the shoemaker, the huckster, together with nondescript workers other than farm-labourers; a set of people who owed a certain stability of aim and conduct to the fact of their being lifeholders like Tess's father, or copyholders, or occasionally, small freeholders.
At the corner of an alley a huckster and his wife had two tables set out with tapes, thread, cotton handkerchiefs, etc.
Erskine," added Trefusis, lowering his voice, and turning to the poet, "you are wrong to take part with hucksters and money-hunters against your own nature, even though the attack upon them is led by a man who prefers photography to etching.
Sancho spent the afternoon in drawing up certain ordinances relating to the good government of what he fancied the island; and he ordained that there were to be no provision hucksters in the State, and that men might import wine into it from any place they pleased, provided they declared the quarter it came from, so that a price might be put upon it according to its quality, reputation, and the estimation it was held in; and he that watered his wine, or changed the name, was to forfeit his life for it.
So this is as much as to say, perverse and thieving knave that you are, that you permit yourself to be lacking in respect towards the Auditor of the Châtelet, to the magistrate committed to the popular police of Paris, charged with searching out crimes, delinquencies, and evil conduct; with controlling all trades, and interdicting monopoly; with maintaining the pavements; with debarring the hucksters of chickens, poultry, and water-fowl; of superintending the measuring of fagots and other sorts of wood; of purging the city of mud, and the air of contagious maladies; in a word, with attending continually to public affairs, without wages or hope of salary
We shall go in to the prince anon; but in truth he hath much upon his hands, for what with Pedro, and the King of Majorca, and the King of Navarre, who is no two days of the same mind, and the Gascon barons who are all chaffering for terms like so many hucksters, he hath an uneasy part to play.
They were jumbled together in a most unsightly fashion, in the middle of the road; to the great obstruction of the thoroughfare and the annoyance of passengers, who were fain to make their way, as they best could, among carts, baskets, barrows, trucks, casks, bulks, and benches, and to jostle with porters, hucksters, waggoners, and a motley crowd of buyers, sellers, pick- pockets, vagrants, and idlers.
They walked back through the miserable muddy streets, and among the poor, mean shops, and were jostled by the crowds of dirty hucksters usual to a poor neighbourhood.