hulk


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hulk

 (hŭlk)
n.
1. Nautical
a. A heavy, unwieldy ship.
b. The hull of an old, unseaworthy, or wrecked ship.
c. often hulks An old or unseaworthy ship used as a prison or warehouse.
2. One, such as a person or object, that is bulky, clumsy, or unwieldy.
3. A wrecked or abandoned shell of a usually large object, such as a building or vehicle.
intr.v. hulked, hulk·ing, hulks
1. To appear as a massive or towering form; loom: The big truck hulked out of the fog.
2. To move clumsily.

[Middle English, from Old English hulc, from Medieval Latin hulcus, probably from Greek holkas, ship that is towed, merchant ship, from holkos, machine for hauling ships, from helkein, to pull.]

hulk

(hʌlk)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) the body of an abandoned vessel
2. (Nautical Terms) derogatory a large or unwieldy vessel
3. derogatory a large ungainly person or thing
4. (Nautical Terms) (often plural) the frame or hull of a ship, used as a storehouse, etc, or (esp in 19th-century Britain) as a prison
vb
5. (intr) informal Brit to move clumsily
6. (often foll by: up) to rise massively
[Old English hulc, from Medieval Latin hulca, from Greek holkas barge, from helkein to tow]

hulk

(hʌlk)

n.
1. the body of an old or dismantled ship.
2. a ship specially built to serve as a storehouse, prison, etc., and not for sea service.
3. an unwieldy ship or boat.
4. a bulky or unwieldy person, object, or mass.
5. the shell of something wrecked, burned-out, or abandoned.
v.i.
6. to appear as a large, massive bulk; loom (often fol. by up).
[before 1000; Old English hulc; perhaps < Medieval Latin hulcus < Greek holkás trading vessel, orig., towed ship]

hulk


Past participle: hulked
Gerund: hulking

Imperative
hulk
hulk
Present
I hulk
you hulk
he/she/it hulks
we hulk
you hulk
they hulk
Preterite
I hulked
you hulked
he/she/it hulked
we hulked
you hulked
they hulked
Present Continuous
I am hulking
you are hulking
he/she/it is hulking
we are hulking
you are hulking
they are hulking
Present Perfect
I have hulked
you have hulked
he/she/it has hulked
we have hulked
you have hulked
they have hulked
Past Continuous
I was hulking
you were hulking
he/she/it was hulking
we were hulking
you were hulking
they were hulking
Past Perfect
I had hulked
you had hulked
he/she/it had hulked
we had hulked
you had hulked
they had hulked
Future
I will hulk
you will hulk
he/she/it will hulk
we will hulk
you will hulk
they will hulk
Future Perfect
I will have hulked
you will have hulked
he/she/it will have hulked
we will have hulked
you will have hulked
they will have hulked
Future Continuous
I will be hulking
you will be hulking
he/she/it will be hulking
we will be hulking
you will be hulking
they will be hulking
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hulking
you have been hulking
he/she/it has been hulking
we have been hulking
you have been hulking
they have been hulking
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hulking
you will have been hulking
he/she/it will have been hulking
we will have been hulking
you will have been hulking
they will have been hulking
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hulking
you had been hulking
he/she/it had been hulking
we had been hulking
you had been hulking
they had been hulking
Conditional
I would hulk
you would hulk
he/she/it would hulk
we would hulk
you would hulk
they would hulk
Past Conditional
I would have hulked
you would have hulked
he/she/it would have hulked
we would have hulked
you would have hulked
they would have hulked
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hulk - a very large personhulk - a very large person; impressive in size or qualities
large person - a person of greater than average size
2.hulk - a ship that has been wrecked and abandoned
ship - a vessel that carries passengers or freight
Verb1.hulk - appear very large or occupy a commanding positionhulk - appear very large or occupy a commanding position; "The huge sculpture predominates over the fountain"; "Large shadows loomed on the canyon wall"
rear, rise, lift - rise up; "The building rose before them"

hulk

noun wreck, shell, hull, shipwreck, frame I could make out the gutted hulk of the tanker.

hulk

noun
A large, ungainly, and dull-witted person:
Informal: lummox.
verb
To move heavily:
Translations
شَخصٌ أو شيءٌ ضَخْم أو هائِلهَيْكَل سَفينَه مَهْجورَه
kolohnátkolosvyřazená loď
skrogskrummelvrag
csupasz hajótestdarab: nagy darab
aflóga skipsskrokkurbeljaki; tröllaukinn hlutur
gremėzdaslaivo griaučiai
lempisveca/nederīga kuģa korpuss
hromotĺkvyradená loď
hurda gemiiri yarı ve hantalizbandut

hulk

[hʌlk] N
1. (Naut) (= abandoned ship) → casco m (pej) (= clumsy ship) → carraca f
2. (= large, ungainly building) → armatoste m
a great hulk of a manun gigantón

hulk

[ˈhʌlk] n
(= remains) [ship] → épave f; [car, building] → carcasse f
(= person) → mastodonte m, malabar m

hulk

n
(Naut: = body of ship) → (Schiffs)rumpf m
(inf: = person) → Hüne m (inf); I followed his big hulk into the roomich folgte seiner hünenhaften Gestalt ins Zimmer
(= wrecked vehicle)Wrack nt; (= wrecked building etc)Ruine f

hulk

[hʌlk] n (abandoned ship) → nave f in disarmo; (building) → costruzione f mastodontica
a great hulk of a man (fam) → un colosso

hulk

(halk) noun
1. the body of an old ship from which everything has been taken away.
2. something or someone enormous and clumsy.
References in classic literature ?
A hulk came along- side, took our cargo, and then we went into dry dock to get our copper stripped.
Rat after rat ap- peared on our rail, took a last look over his shoulder, and leaped with a hollow thud into the empty hulk.
The railings, fittings, the greater part of the deck, and top sides disappeared on the 20th, and the Henrietta was now only a flat hulk.
Here in thy loneliness the eglantine Weaves her sweet tapestries above thy head, While blow across thy bed, Moist with the dew of heaven, the breezes chill: Fire-fly, will-o'-the-wisp, and wandering star Glow in thy gloom, and naught is heard but the far Chanting of woodman and shepherd from the hill, Naught but the startled bird is seen Soaring away in the moonland sheen, Or the hulk of the scampering beast that fears Their plaintive lays as, to and fro, The pallid singers go.
Her Majesty, God bless her, has too many young men to need an old hulk like me.
It's been meat and drink, and man and wife, to me; and if I'm not to have my rum now I'm a poor old hulk on a lee shore, my blood'll be on you, Jim, and that doctor swab"; and he ran on again for a while with curses.
And for a good quarter of a mile, from the dockyard gate to the farthest corner, where the old housed-in hulk, the President (drill-ship, then, of the Naval Reserve), used to lie with her frigate side rubbing against the stone of the quay, above all these hulls, ready and unready, a hundred and fifty lofty masts, more or less, held out the web of their rigging like an immense net, in whose close mesh, black against the sky, the heavy yards seemed to be entangled and suspended.
The wreck then righted, but was a mere hulk, full of water, with a heavy sea washing over it, and all the hatches off.
People are put in the Hulks because they murder, and because they rob, and forge, and do all sorts of bad; and they always begin by asking questions.
I can visualize the entire scene--the apelike Grimaldi men huddled in their filthy caves; the huge pterodactyls soaring through the heavy air upon their bat-like wings; the mighty dinosaurs moving their clumsy hulks beneath the dark shadows of preglacial forests--the dragons which we considered myths until science taught us that they were the true recollections of the first man, handed down through countless ages by word of mouth from father to son out of the unrecorded dawn of humanity.
The miserable companion of thieves and ruffians, the fallen outcast of low haunts, the associate of the scourings of the jails and hulks, living within the shadow of the gallows itself,--even this degraded being felt too proud to betray a feeble gleam of the womanly feeling which she thought a weakness, but which alone connected her with that humanity, of which her wasting life had obliterated so many, many traces when a very child.
It was there Wilmore had first met him and fought against him; and in that war Zaccone had been taken prisoner, sent to England, and consigned to the hulks, whence he had escaped by swimming.