human nature


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human nature

n.
The sum of qualities and traits shared by all humans.

human nature

n
1. the qualities common to humanity
2. ordinary human behaviour, esp considered as less than perfect
3. (Sociology) sociol the unique elements that form a basic part of human life and distinguish it from other animal life

hu′man na′ture


n.
1. the psychological and social qualities that characterize humankind.
2. the character of human conduct, generally regarded as produced by living in primary groups.
[1735–45]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.human nature - the shared psychological attributes of humankind that are assumed to be shared by all human beings; "a great observer of human nature"
attribute - an abstraction belonging to or characteristic of an entity
Translations

human nature

ndie menschliche Natur; it’s human nature to do thates liegt (nun einmal) in der Natur des Menschen, das zu tun

human nature

nla natura umana
it's human nature → è nella natura umana, è umano
References in classic literature ?
The tortoise--as the alderman of Bristol, well learned in eating, knows by much experience--besides the delicious calipash and calipee, contains many different kinds of food; nor can the learned reader be ignorant, that in human nature, though here collected under one general name, is such prodigious variety, that a cook will have sooner gone through all the several species of animal and vegetable food in the world, than an author will be able to exhaust so extensive a subject.
But of recent years my understanding of human nature has become such that I realize that no normal healthy human would tolerate such performances did he or she know the terrible cruelty that lies behind them and makes them possible.
Tourguenief was of that great race which has more than any other fully and freely uttered human nature, without either false pride or false shame in its nakedness.
but happiest, beyond all comparison, are those excellent STRULDBRUGS, who, being born exempt from that universal calamity of human nature, have their minds free and disengaged, without the weight and depression of spirits caused by the continual apprehensions of death
It may be a reflection on human nature, that such devices should be necessary to control the abuses of government.
Whether from diffidence or shame, or a touch of anger, or mere procrastination, or because (as we have seen) he had no skill in literary arts, or because (as I am sometimes tempted to suppose) there is a law in human nature that prevents young men - not otherwise beasts - from the performance of this simple act of piety - months and years had gone by, and John had never written.
Such varieties of human nature as they are in the habit of witnessing
It is to the credit of human nature that, except where its selfishness is brought into play, it loves more readily than it hates.
And although fashion in dress and modes of living may change, human nature does not change.
But it is really too hard upon human nature that it should be held a criminal offence to imagine the death even of the king when he is turned eighty-three.
The reader will here find no regions cursed with irremediable barrenness, or blessed with spontaneous fecundity, no perpetual gloom or unceasing sunshine; nor are the nations here described either devoid of all sense of humanity, or consummate in all private and social virtues; here are no Hottentots without religion, polity, or articulate language, no Chinese perfectly polite, and completely skilled in all sciences: he will discover, what will always be discovered by a diligent and impartial inquirer, that wherever human nature is to be found there is a mixture of vice and virtue, a contest of passion and reason, and that the Creator doth not appear partial in his distributions, but has balanced in most countries their particular inconveniences by particular favours.
But howsoever these things are thus in men's depraved judgments, and affections, yet truth, which only doth judge itself, teacheth that the inquiry of truth, which is the love-making, or wooing of it, the knowledge of truth, which is the presence of it, and the belief of truth, which is the enjoying of it, is the sovereign good of human nature.

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