humanism


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hu·man·ism

 (hyo͞o′mə-nĭz′əm)
n.
1.
a. A system of thought that focuses on humans and their values, capacities, and worth.
b. Humanism A cultural and intellectual movement of the Renaissance that emphasized human potential to attain excellence and promoted direct study of the literature, art, and civilization of classical Greece and Rome.
c. The study of the humanities; learning in the liberal arts.
d. Secular humanism.
2. Concern with the interests, needs, and welfare of humans: "the newest flower on the vine of corporate humanism" (Savvy).

humanism

(ˈhjuːməˌnɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the denial of any power or moral value superior to that of humanity; the rejection of religion in favour of a belief in the advancement of humanity by its own efforts
2. (Philosophy) a philosophical position that stresses the autonomy of human reason in contradistinction to the authority of the Church
3. (Literary & Literary Critical Movements) (often capital) a cultural movement of the Renaissance, based on classical studies
4. interest in the welfare of people
ˈhumanist n
ˌhumanˈistic adj
ˌhumanˈistically adv

hu•man•ism

(ˈhyu məˌnɪz əm; often ˈyu-)

n.
1. (often cap.) any system of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity predominate, esp. an ethical theory that often rejects the importance of a belief in God.
2. devotion to or study of the humanities.
3. (sometimes cap.) the studies, principles, or culture of the Renaissance humanists.
[1805–15]

humanism

1. any system or mode of thought or action in which human interests, values, and dignity are taken to be of primary importance, as in moral judgments.
2. a devotion to or study of the humanities.
3. a theory of the life of man as a responsible being behaving independently of a revelation or deity. Also called naturalistic, scientific, or philosophical humanism. — humanist, n. — humanistic, adj.
See also: Mankind

humanism

A view originating in the Renaissance that reason must be autonomous from authorities such as the Church.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humanism - the doctrine that people's duty is to promote human welfare
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
2.humanism - the doctrine emphasizing a person's capacity for self-realization through reason; rejects religion and the supernatural
doctrine, ism, philosophical system, philosophy, school of thought - a belief (or system of beliefs) accepted as authoritative by some group or school
3.humanism - the cultural movement of the Renaissance; based on classical studies
cultural movement - a group of people working together to advance certain cultural goals
Translations
humanismushumanizmus
humanizam
humanisme

humanism

[ˈhjuːmənɪzəm] Nhumanismo m

humanism

[ˈhjuːmənɪzəm] nhumanisme m

humanism

nHumanismus m

humanism

[ˈhjuːməˌnɪzm] numanesimo
References in classic literature ?
A member of the Oxford group in its second generation, a close friend of Erasmus, his house a center of humanism, he became even more conspicuous in public life.
Secular humanists plead guilty as charged to these and many other claims that show the genuine and radical differences between humanism and revealed religion.
While I appreciated Lyle Simpson's article celebrating a century of humanism ("What's in a Name?
The author examines the relationship between humanism and race, religion, and popular culture in the US.
King provides a general introduction to Renaissance humanism.
The Ohrid Academy of Humanism presented its World Humanism Award 2013 to Nobel Prize Winner Herta Muller on 18 January.
Ihe narrative is unified through de Gruchy's commitment to Christian humanism throughout this embodied resistance.
With this question Doyle launches into a tightly argued thesis that a renewed contemporary Christian humanism can respond to this question, and that a theological foundation for this humanism is found in Aquinas's understanding of the theological virtue of hope.
The informal, friendly discussion will go into details of what Humanism is all about.
Modernist humanism and the men of 1914; Joyce, Lewis, Pound, and Eliot.
In hopes to stimulate discussion about humanism in healthcare, the WVU Chapter of the Gold Humanism Honor Society hosted the nation's first ever Gold Humanism Week, February 1418, 2011.
The editors, Antonio Maria Martin Rodriguez and German Santana Henriquez, offer a meticulous and thorough presentation of the topic of humanism that encompasses a wide geopolitical territory, ranging from Spain and the Canary Islands to the Americas.