humanity


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hu·man·i·ty

 (hyo͞o-măn′ĭ-tē)
n. pl. hu·man·i·ties
1. Humans considered as a group; the human race.
2. The condition or quality of being human.
3. The quality of being humane; benevolence.
4. A humane characteristic, attribute, or act.
5. humanities
a. The languages and literatures of ancient Greece and Rome; the classics.
b. Those branches of knowledge, such as philosophy, literature, and art, that are concerned with human thought and culture.

[Middle English humanite, from Old French, from Latin hūmānitās, from hūmānus, human; see human.]

humanity

(hjuːˈmænɪtɪ)
n, pl -ties
1. the human race
2. the quality of being human
3. kindness or mercy
4. (Philosophy) the humanities (plural) the study of literature, philosophy, and the arts
5. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) the study of Ancient Greek and Roman language, literature, etc

hu•man•i•ty

(hyuˈmæn ɪ ti; often yu-)

n., pl. -ties.
1. all human beings collectively; the human race; humankind.
2. the quality or condition of being human; human nature.
3. the quality of being humane; kindness; benevolence; goodwill.
4. the humanities,
a. literature, languages, philosophy, art, etc., or their study: distinguished from the sciences.
b. classical languages and classical literature, esp. as a field of study.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin hūmānitās. See human, -ity]

Humanity

 human beings collectively, 1579.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humanity - the quality of being humane
humaneness - the quality of compassion or consideration for others (people or animals)
2.humanity - the quality of being human; "he feared the speedy decline of all manhood"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
3.humanity - all of the living human inhabitants of the earthhumanity - all of the living human inhabitants of the earth; "all the world loves a lover"; "she always used `humankind' because `mankind' seemed to slight the women"
group, grouping - any number of entities (members) considered as a unit
human, human being, homo, man - any living or extinct member of the family Hominidae characterized by superior intelligence, articulate speech, and erect carriage
people - (plural) any group of human beings (men or women or children) collectively; "old people"; "there were at least 200 people in the audience"

humanity

noun
1. the human race, man, mankind, people, men, mortals, humankind, Homo sapiens They face charges of committing crimes against humanity.
2. human nature, mortality, humanness It made him feel deprived of his humanity.
plural noun
1. arts, liberal arts, classics, classical studies, literae humaniores The number of students majoring in the humanities has declined.
Quotations
"Out of the crooked timber of humanity no straight thing can ever be made" [Immanuel Kant Idee zu einer allgemeinen Geschichte in welt bürgerlicher Absicht]
"We're all of us guinea pigs in the laboratory of God. Humanity is just a work in progress" [Tennessee Williams Camino Real]

humanity

noun
Translations
إنسانِيَّه، لَطافَه، شَفَقَهالبَشَرِيَّه
lidstvohumanita
menneskehedmenneskelighedvenlighed
humanitéscience humaine
emberségesség
mannkynmannúî
žmonijažmoniškumas
cilvēcecilvēcīgumshumānums
benevolenţăbunătateumanitate
humanita
človeštvo

humanity

[hjuːˈmænɪtɪ] N
1. (gen) → humanidad f
crimes against humanitycrímenes mpl contra la humanidad or de lesa humanidad
2. (Literat, Art) the humanitieslas humanidades
3. (Scol) humanitiesletras fpl, humanidades fpl

humanity

[hjuːˈmænɪti]
nhumanité f humanities
npl (history, philosophy, literature)humanités fpl

humanity

n
(= mankind)die Menschheit
(= human nature)Menschlichkeit f, → Menschenhaftigkeit f
(= humaneness)Humanität f, → Menschlichkeit f; to treat somebody with humanityjdn human behandeln
humanities plGeisteswissenschaften pl; (= Latin and Greek)Altphilologie f

humanity

[hjuːˈmænɪtɪ] numanità
the humanities → gli studi letterari or umanistici, le lettere

humanity

(hjuˈmӕnəti) noun
1. kindness. a man of great humanity.
2. people in general. all humanity.

see also humane.

humanity

n. humanidad.
References in classic literature ?
But someone did come and help her, though Jo did not recognize her good angels at once because they wore familiar shapes and used the simple spells best fitted to poor humanity.
Sometimes she stayed in the room with him all day, walking about and occasionally creeping close to touch him tenderly with her hands, and then other days came when she did not want to see or be near the tiny bit of humanity that had come into the house.
There were days when she was unhappy, she did not know why,--when it did not seem worth while to be glad or sorry, to be alive or dead; when life appeared to her like a grotesque pandemonium and humanity like worms struggling blindly toward inevitable annihilation.
The life lies low in a Mingo, and humanity teaches us to make a quick end to the sarpents.
On the tenth day of March following, I, and ten of my men, were conducted by forty Indians to Detroit, where we arrived the thirtieth day, and were treated by Governor Hamilton, the British commander at that post, with great humanity.
A party of leaden dragoons were galloping along one of the shelves, in equipments and uniform of modern cut; and there were some sugar figures, with no strong resemblance to the humanity of any epoch, but less unsatisfactorily representing our own fashions than those of a hundred years ago.
I used to watch and study this patriarchal personage with, I think, livelier curiosity than any other form of humanity there presented to my notice.
If, then, to meanest mariners, and renegades and castaways, I shall hereafter ascribe high qualities, though dark; weave round them tragic graces; if even the most mournful, perchance the most abased, among them all, shall at times lift himself to the exalted mounts; if I shall touch that workman's arm with some ethereal light; if I shall spread a rainbow over his disastrous set of sun; then against all mortal critics bear me out in it, thou just spirit of equality, which hast spread one royal mantle of humanity over all my kind
They could tell the whole hateful story of it, set forth the inner soul of a city in which justice and honor, women's bodies and men's souls, were for sale in the marketplace, and human beings writhed and fought and fell upon each other like wolves in a pit; in which lusts were raging fires, and men were fuel, and humanity was festering and stewing and wallowing in its own corruption.
And I lays it all to my management, sir; and humanity, sir, I may say, is the great pillar of my management.
Visit the Navy Yard, and behold a marine, such a man as an American government can make, or such as it can make a man with its black arts--a mere shadow and reminiscence of humanity, a man laid out alive and standing, and already, as one may say, buried under arms with funeral accompaniment, though it may be,
He said his heart was broken, he would give the remnant of his life to high deeds in the cause of humanity, and so find a worthy death and a blessed reunion with the brave true heart whose love had more honored him than all his victories in war.

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