humid


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hu·mid

 (hyo͞o′mĭd)
adj.
Containing or characterized by a high amount of water or water vapor: humid air; a humid evening.

[Middle English, from Latin hūmidus, from hūmēre, to be moist.]

hu′mid·ly adv.

humid

(ˈhjuːmɪd)
adj
moist; damp: a humid day.
[C16: from Latin ūmidus, from ūmēre to be wet; see humectant, humour]
ˈhumidly adv
ˈhumidness n

hu•mid

(ˈhyu mɪd; often ˈyu-)

adj.
containing a high amount of water or water vapor: humid air.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin (h)ūmidus=(h)ūm(ēre) to be moist]
hu′mid•ly, adv.
hu′mid•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.humid - containing or characterized by a great deal of water vapor; "humid air"; "humid weather"
wet - covered or soaked with a liquid such as water; "a wet bathing suit"; "wet sidewalks"; "wet weather"

humid

adjective damp, sticky, moist, wet, steamy, sultry, dank, clammy, muggy Visitors can expect hot and humid conditions.
dry, sunny, arid, torrid

humid

adjective
Damp and warm:
Translations
رَطْبرَطْبٌ
влаженвлажнавлажно
vlhký
fugtig
kostea
vlažan
rakur
湿気のある
습기 찬
mitrs
vochtigvochtige
fuktig
ชื้น
nemlirutubetli
ẩm ướt

humid

[ˈhjuːmɪd] ADJhúmedo

humid

[ˈhjuːmɪd] adjhumide
humid weather → un temps humide et chaud

humid

adjfeucht; it’s (hot and) humid todayes ist schwül heute

humid

[ˈhjuːmɪd] adjumido/a

humid

(ˈhjuːmid) adjective
damp. a humid climate.
huˈmidity noun

humid

رَطْبٌ vlhký fugtig schwül υγρός húmedo kostea humide vlažan umido 湿気のある 습기 찬 vochtig fuktig wilgotny húmido, úmido влажный fuktig ชื้น nemli ẩm ướt 潮湿的

humid

a. húmedo-a, que contiene humedad.

humid

adj húmedo
References in classic literature ?
Ah, d n it," thought Tom, "I should have said HUMID light'--how the deuce did I come to forget that word--it would have rounded the sentence beautifully.
But there was no rustle, no movement; nothing but the humid oppressive silence.
By the time that Tess was dressed Clare was downstairs and out in the humid air.
There is scarcely any rain throughout this time, yet the face of the country is kept fresh and verdant by nightly dews, and occasionally by humid fogs in the mornings.
He examined many things minutely--strange tools and weapons, books, paper, clothing-- what little had withstood the ravages of time in the humid atmosphere of the jungle coast.
In the society in which Prince Andrew lived he had never seen anyone who together with awkward and clumsy gestures possessed such calmness and self-assurance; he had never seen so resolute yet gentle an expression as that in those half-closed, rather humid eyes, or so firm a smile that expressed nothing; nor had he heard such a refined, smooth, soft voice; above all he had never seen such delicate whiteness of face or hands- hands which were broad, but very plump, soft, and white.
Confining our view to South America, we should certainly be tempted to believe that trees flourished only under a very humid climate; for the limit of the forest-land follows, in a most remarkable manner, that of the damp winds.
The ceaseless care was growing less now, and the family breathed more freely, for the mother's sigh of pain no longer came from the stifling bedroom, where, during a hot and humid August, Aurelia had lain, suffering with every breath she drew.
The morning drum had just been beaten; everyone shook off the drowsiness of night, and to dispel the humid morning air, came to take a drop at the inn.
She saw the humid eyes of the king, his pale brow, his convulsed lips, and cried, with an accent that cannot be described, --
When, still a little fellow, he had dragged himself tortuously and by jerks beneath the shadows of its vaults, he seemed, with his human face and his bestial limbs, the natural reptile of that humid and sombre pavement, upon which the shadow of the Romanesque capitals cast so many strange forms.
She flung wild glances, like those of an entrapped animal, up and down the big whitewashed room that panted with heat and that was thickly humid with the steam that sizzled from the damp cloth under the irons of the many ironers.