humid


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hu·mid

 (hyo͞o′mĭd)
adj.
Containing or characterized by a high amount of water or water vapor: humid air; a humid evening.

[Middle English, from Latin hūmidus, from hūmēre, to be moist.]

hu′mid·ly adv.

humid

(ˈhjuːmɪd)
adj
moist; damp: a humid day.
[C16: from Latin ūmidus, from ūmēre to be wet; see humectant, humour]
ˈhumidly adv
ˈhumidness n

hu•mid

(ˈhyu mɪd; often ˈyu-)

adj.
containing a high amount of water or water vapor: humid air.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Latin (h)ūmidus=(h)ūm(ēre) to be moist]
hu′mid•ly, adv.
hu′mid•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.humid - containing or characterized by a great deal of water vapor; "humid air"; "humid weather"
wet - covered or soaked with a liquid such as water; "a wet bathing suit"; "wet sidewalks"; "wet weather"

humid

adjective damp, sticky, moist, wet, steamy, sultry, dank, clammy, muggy Visitors can expect hot and humid conditions.
dry, sunny, arid, torrid

humid

adjective
Damp and warm:
Translations
رَطْبرَطْبٌ
влаженвлажнавлажно
vlhký
fugtig
kostea
vlažan
rakur
湿気のある
습기 찬
mitrs
vochtigvochtige
fuktig
ชื้น
nemlirutubetli
ẩm ướt

humid

[ˈhjuːmɪd] ADJhúmedo

humid

[ˈhjuːmɪd] adjhumide
humid weather → un temps humide et chaud

humid

adjfeucht; it’s (hot and) humid todayes ist schwül heute

humid

[ˈhjuːmɪd] adjumido/a

humid

(ˈhjuːmid) adjective
damp. a humid climate.
huˈmidity noun

humid

رَطْبٌ vlhký fugtig schwül υγρός húmedo kostea humide vlažan umido 湿気のある 습기 찬 vochtig fuktig wilgotny húmido, úmido влажный fuktig ชื้น nemli ẩm ướt 潮湿的

humid

a. húmedo-a, que contiene humedad.

humid

adj húmedo
References in classic literature ?
Cora bestowed an approving smile on the pious efforts of the namesake of the Jewish prince, and Heyward soon turned his steady, stern look from the outlet of the cavern, to fasten it, with a milder character, on the face of David, or to meet the wandering beams which at moments strayed from the humid eyes of Alice.
The ceaseless care was growing less now, and the family breathed more freely, for the mother's sigh of pain no longer came from the stifling bedroom, where, during a hot and humid August, Aurelia had lain, suffering with every breath she drew.
Perfect beauty is a strong expression; but I do not retrace or qualify it: as sweet features as ever the temperate clime of Albion moulded; as pure hues of rose and lily as ever her humid gales and vapoury skies generated and screened, justified, in this instance, the term.
And higher then that Wall a circling row Of goodliest Trees loaden with fairest Fruit, Blossoms and Fruits at once of golden hue Appeerd, with gay enameld colours mixt: On which the Sun more glad impress'd his beams Then in fair Evening Cloud, or humid Bow, When God hath showrd the earth; so lovely seemd That Lantskip: And of pure now purer aire Meets his approach, and to the heart inspires Vernal delight and joy, able to drive All sadness but despair: now gentle gales Fanning thir odoriferous wings dispense Native perfumes, and whisper whence they stole Those balmie spoiles.
The morning drum had just been beaten; everyone shook off the drowsiness of night, and to dispel the humid morning air, came to take a drop at the inn.
Two soldiers were accordingly sent for, and the inspector descended a stairway, so foul, so humid, so dark, as to be loathsome to sight, smell, and respiration.
Ah, d n it," thought Tom, "I should have said HUMID light'--how the deuce did I come to forget that word--it would have rounded the sentence beautifully.
But this was not all; the antipathy which had sprung up between myself and my employer striking deeper root and spreading denser shade daily, excluded me from every glimpse of the sunshine of life; and I began to feel like a plant growing in humid darkness out of the slimy walls of a well.
She saw the humid eyes of the king, his pale brow, his convulsed lips, and cried, with an accent that cannot be described, --
There is scarcely any rain throughout this time, yet the face of the country is kept fresh and verdant by nightly dews, and occasionally by humid fogs in the mornings.
Honore, and his small apartments lay between the court of the house and an old garden which spread itself behind it--one of those large, sunless humid gardens into which you look unexpectingly in Paris from back windows, wondering how among the grudging habitations they find their space.
It was now fully night-fall, and a thick humid fog hung over the city, soon ending in a settled and heavy rain.