humoralist

humoralist

(ˈhjuːmərəlɪst)
n
(Pathology) a person who believes in humoralism
References in periodicals archive ?
Juliet's willful idealization of her lover, the mystification of the moment of mutual attraction, and the sheer excessiveness of the play's language of love accord more closely with psychoanalytic (especially Lacanian) than with humoralist accounts of passion, so that Shakespeare might be seen as getting traction from Galenic thought as he makes contributions to an emergent humanism.
The kind of love toward which Shakespeare gestures in Romeo and Juliet defies the discursive range of language itself, even as it is constituted--not wholly but largely--by words on the page, so perhaps we should not be surprised to see it wiggle so persistently out of the grasp of both psychoanalytic and humoralist interpretations.
Strier not only disputes old and new historicists on their suspicions but also questions what he calls "New Humoralists," a group represented in this book by Michael Schoenfeldt, who cannot help but find a "systematizing impulse" that effectively sees control in freedom, repression in liberation (18-19).