humour


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hu·mour

 (hyo͞o′mər)
n. & v. Chiefly British
Variant of humor.

humour

(ˈhjuːmə) or

humor

n
1. the quality of being funny
2. Also called: sense of humour the ability to appreciate or express that which is humorous
3. situations, speech, or writings that are thought to be humorous
4.
a. a state of mind; temper; mood
b. (in combination): ill humour; good humour.
5. temperament or disposition
6. a caprice or whim
7. (Physiology) any of various fluids in the body, esp the aqueous humour and vitreous humour
8. (Physiology) archaic Also called: cardinal humour any of the four bodily fluids (blood, phlegm, choler or yellow bile, melancholy or black bile) formerly thought to determine emotional and physical disposition
9. out of humour in a bad mood
vb (tr)
10. to attempt to gratify; indulge: he humoured the boy's whims.
11. to adapt oneself to: to humour someone's fantasies.
[C14: from Latin humor liquid; related to Latin ūmēre to be wet, Old Norse vökr moist, Greek hugros wet]
ˈhumourful, ˈhumorful adj
ˈhumourless, ˈhumorless adj
ˈhumourlessness, ˈhumorlessness n

hu•mor

(ˈhyu mər; often ˈyu-)
n.
1. a comic, absurd, or incongruous quality causing amusement.
2. the faculty of perceiving and expressing or appreciating what is amusing or comical: a writer with humor and zest.
3. an instance of being or attempting to be comical or amusing; something humorous.
4. comical writing or talk in general; comical books, skits, plays, etc.
5. mental disposition or temperament.
6. a temporary mood or frame of mind: in a sulky humor today.
7. a capricious or freakish inclination; whim or caprice; odd trait.
8. any animal or plant fluid, esp. one of the body fluids once regarded as determining a person's constitution: blood, phlegm, black bile, or yellow bile.
v.t.
9. to comply with the humor or mood of in order to soothe, cheer up, etc.: to humor a child.
10. to adapt or accommodate oneself to: I'll humor your whim for now.
Idioms:
out of humor, dissatisfied; cross.
Also, esp. Brit., humour.
[1300–50; Middle English (h)umour < Anglo-French < Latin (h)ūmor moisture, bodily fluid =(h)ūm(ēre) to be wet (compare humid) + -ōr- -or1]
hu′mor•less, adj.
hu′mor•less•ly, adv.
hu′mor•less•ness, n.
syn: humor, wit refer to an ability to perceive and express a sense of the clever or amusing. humor consists principally in the recognition and expression of incongruities or peculiarities present in a situation or character. It is frequently used to illustrate some fundamental absurdity in human nature or conduct, and is generally thought of as a kindly trait: a genial and mellow type of humor. wit is a purely intellectual, often spontaneous, manifestation of cleverness and quickness in discovering analogies between things really unlike, and expressing them in brief, diverting, and often sharp observations: biting wit.

humour


Past participle: humoured
Gerund: humouring

Imperative
humour
humour
Present
I humour
you humour
he/she/it humours
we humour
you humour
they humour
Preterite
I humoured
you humoured
he/she/it humoured
we humoured
you humoured
they humoured
Present Continuous
I am humouring
you are humouring
he/she/it is humouring
we are humouring
you are humouring
they are humouring
Present Perfect
I have humoured
you have humoured
he/she/it has humoured
we have humoured
you have humoured
they have humoured
Past Continuous
I was humouring
you were humouring
he/she/it was humouring
we were humouring
you were humouring
they were humouring
Past Perfect
I had humoured
you had humoured
he/she/it had humoured
we had humoured
you had humoured
they had humoured
Future
I will humour
you will humour
he/she/it will humour
we will humour
you will humour
they will humour
Future Perfect
I will have humoured
you will have humoured
he/she/it will have humoured
we will have humoured
you will have humoured
they will have humoured
Future Continuous
I will be humouring
you will be humouring
he/she/it will be humouring
we will be humouring
you will be humouring
they will be humouring
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been humouring
you have been humouring
he/she/it has been humouring
we have been humouring
you have been humouring
they have been humouring
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been humouring
you will have been humouring
he/she/it will have been humouring
we will have been humouring
you will have been humouring
they will have been humouring
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been humouring
you had been humouring
he/she/it had been humouring
we had been humouring
you had been humouring
they had been humouring
Conditional
I would humour
you would humour
he/she/it would humour
we would humour
you would humour
they would humour
Past Conditional
I would have humoured
you would have humoured
he/she/it would have humoured
we would have humoured
you would have humoured
they would have humoured
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.humour - a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feelinghumour - a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor"
feeling - the experiencing of affective and emotional states; "she had a feeling of euphoria"; "he had terrible feelings of guilt"; "I disliked him and the feeling was mutual"
peeve - an annoyed or irritated mood
sulk, sulkiness - a mood or display of sullen aloofness or withdrawal; "stayed home in a sulk"
amiability, good humor, good humour, good temper - a cheerful and agreeable mood
ill humor, ill humour, distemper - an angry and disagreeable mood
2.humour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughterhumour - a message whose ingenuity or verbal skill or incongruity has the power to evoke laughter
subject matter, content, message, substance - what a communication that is about something is about
jeu d'esprit - a witty comment or writing
bon mot, mot - a clever remark
esprit de l'escalier - a witty remark that occurs to you too late
pungency, bite - wit having a sharp and caustic quality; "he commented with typical pungency"; "the bite of satire"
caustic remark, irony, sarcasm, satire - witty language used to convey insults or scorn; "he used sarcasm to upset his opponent"; "irony is wasted on the stupid"; "Satire is a sort of glass, wherein beholders do generally discover everybody's face but their own"--Jonathan Swift
repartee - adroitness and cleverness in reply
gag, jape, jest, joke, laugh - a humorous anecdote or remark intended to provoke laughter; "he told a very funny joke"; "he knows a million gags"; "thanks for the laugh"; "he laughed unpleasantly at his own jest"; "even a schoolboy's jape is supposed to have some ascertainable point"
caricature, impersonation, imitation - a representation of a person that is exaggerated for comic effect
cartoon, sketch - a humorous or satirical drawing published in a newspaper or magazine
fun, sport, play - verbal wit or mockery (often at another's expense but not to be taken seriously); "he became a figure of fun"; "he said it in sport"
ribaldry - ribald humor
topper - an exceedingly good witticism that surpasses all that have gone before
libation - (facetious) a serving of an alcoholic beverage
roaster - a harsh or humorous critic (sometimes intended as a facetious compliment); "the honoree gave his roasters as good as he got"
3.humour - (Middle Ages) one of the four fluids in the body whose balance was believed to determine your emotional and physical state; "the humors are blood and phlegm and yellow and black bile"
body substance - the substance of the body
physiology - the branch of the biological sciences dealing with the functioning of organisms
antiquity - the historic period preceding the Middle Ages in Europe
Dark Ages, Middle Ages - the period of history between classical antiquity and the Italian Renaissance
4.humour - the liquid parts of the body
body substance - the substance of the body
aqueous humor, aqueous humour - the limpid fluid within the eyeball between the cornea and the lens
vitreous body, vitreous humor, vitreous humour - the clear colorless transparent jelly that fills the posterior chamber of the eyeball
endolymph - the bodily fluid that fills the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear
perilymph - the bodily fluid that fills the space between the bony labyrinth and the membranous labyrinth of the inner ear
ECF, extracellular fluid - liquid containing proteins and electrolytes including the liquid in blood plasma and interstitial fluid; "the body normally has about 15 quarts of extracellular fluid"
intracellular fluid - liquid contained inside the cell membranes (usually containing dissolved solutes)
succus, juice - any of several liquids of the body; "digestive juices"
karyolymph - a clear liquid in the cell nucleus in which the nucleolus and chromatin and other structures are dispersed
milk - produced by mammary glands of female mammals for feeding their young
amnionic fluid, amniotic fluid, waters - the serous fluid in which the embryo is suspended inside the amnion; "before a woman gives birth her waters break"
blood - the fluid (red in vertebrates) that is pumped through the body by the heart and contains plasma, blood cells, and platelets; "blood carries oxygen and nutrients to the tissues and carries away waste products"; "the ancients believed that blood was the seat of the emotions"
blood serum, serum - an amber, watery fluid, rich in proteins, that separates out when blood coagulates
chyle - a milky fluid consisting of lymph and emulsified fats; formed in the small intestine during digestion of ingested fats
lymph - a thin coagulable fluid (similar to plasma but) containing white blood cells (lymphocytes) and chyle; is conveyed to the blood stream by lymphatic vessels
come, cum, ejaculate, semen, seminal fluid, seed - the thick white fluid containing spermatozoa that is ejaculated by the male genital tract
ink - dark protective fluid ejected into the water by cuttlefish and other cephalopods
secretion - a functionally specialized substance (especially one that is not a waste) released from a gland or cell
black bile, melancholy - a humor that was once believed to be secreted by the kidneys or spleen and to cause sadness and melancholy
yellow bile, choler - a humor that was once believed to be secreted by the liver and to cause irritability and anger
lochia - substance discharged from the vagina (cellular debris and mucus and blood) that gradually decreases in amount during the weeks following childbirth
sanies, suppuration, festering, ichor, purulence, pus - a fluid product of inflammation
cerebrospinal fluid, spinal fluid - clear liquid produced in the ventricles of the brain; fills and protects cavities in the brain and spinal cord
5.humour - the quality of being funny; "I fail to see the humor in it"
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
comicality - the quality of being comical
6.humour - the trait of appreciating (and being able to express) the humorous; "she didn't appreciate my humor"; "you can't survive in the army without a sense of humor"
playfulness, fun - a disposition to find (or make) causes for amusement; "her playfulness surprised me"; "he was fun to be with"
Verb1.humour - put into a good mood
pander, gratify, indulge - yield (to); give satisfaction to

humour

noun
1. comedy, funniness, fun, amusement, funny side, jocularity, facetiousness, ludicrousness, drollery, comical aspect She couldn't ignore the humour of the situation.
comedy grief, gravity, sadness, sorrow, seriousness, melancholy, sobriety, solemnity
2. mood, spirits, temper, disposition, frame of mind Could that have been the source of his good humour?
3. joking, jokes, comedy, wit, gags (informal), farce, jesting, jests, wisecracks (informal), witticisms, wittiness The film has lots of adult humour.
verb
1. indulge, accommodate, go along with, spoil, flatter, pamper, gratify, pander to, mollify, cosset, fawn on Most of the time he humoured her for an easy life.
indulge oppose, stand up to, aggravate
Quotations
"Humour is by far the most significant activity of the human brain" [Edward De Bono]
"Humor brings insight and tolerance. Irony brings a deeper and less friendly understanding" [Agnes Repplier In Pursuit of Laughter]
"The secret source of humor itself is not joy but sorrow. There is no humor in heaven" [Mark Twain Following the Equator]
"There are men so philosophical that they can see humor in their own toothaches. But there has never lived a man so philosophical that he could see the toothache in his own humor" [H.L. Mencken A Mencken Chrestomathy]
"There seems to be no lengths to which humorless people will not go to analyze humor. It seems to worry them" [Robert Benchley What Does It Mean?]

Bodily humours

black bile, yellow bile, blood, phlegm
Translations
المُضْحِك في الأمْردُعَابَةٌمِزاج مَرِح، ظَرافهيُلاطِف، يُسايِر
угаждам
humorsměšnostvyhovět
humorføje
huumori
humor
humorkomikumtestnedvvicckedv
fyndniskopskyn, kímnigáfasÿna undanlátssemi
ユーモア
유머
humorashumoristasjuokingumastaikytis
humorsizdabātizpatiktnoskaņojums
humor
humor
อารมณ์ขัน
gülünçlükmizahmizah yeteneğinazını çekmeksuyuna gitmek
sự hài hước

humour

humor (US) [ˈhjuːməʳ]
A. N
1. (= amusingness) (gen) → humor m; [of book, situation] → gracia f
sense of humoursentido m del humor
to have a sense of humourtener sentido del humor
I see no humour in thatno le veo la gracia a eso
2. (= mood) → humor m
to be in a good/bad humourestar de buen/mal humor
they were in no humour for fightingno estaban de humor para pelear
to be out of humourestar de mal humor
3. (Med) → humor m
B. VTcomplacer, consentir

humour

[ˈhjuːmər] humor (US)
n
(= funniness) → humour m
(also sense of humour) → sens m de l'humour
(= mood) → humeur f
good humour → bonne humeur f
vt [+ person] → faire plaisir à

humour

, (US) humor
n
Humor m; a sense of humour (→ Sinn mfür) → Humor m; their own inimitable brand of humourihre eigene unnachahmliche Art von Humor; a story full of humoureine humorvolle Geschichte; I don’t see the humour in thatich finde das gar nicht komisch; there was little room for humoures war nicht die Zeit für Witze
(= mood)Stimmung f, → Laune f; to be in a good humourin guter Stimmung sein, gute Laune haben; with good humourgut gelaunt; to be out of humour, to be in a bad humourschlechte Laune haben, schlecht gelaunt sein
(old Med) → Körpersaft m
vt to humour somebodyjdm seinen Willen lassen or tun; do it just to humour himtus doch, damit er seinen Willen hat

humour

humor (Am) [ˈhjuːməʳ]
1. n
a. (comic sense) → umorismo; (of situation) → lato divertente or umoristico
sense of humour → senso dell'umorismo
b. (mood) → umore m
to be in a good/bad humour → essere di buon/cattivo umore
2. vt (person) → accontentare, compiacere; (sb's whims) → assecondare

humour

(American) humor (ˈhjuːmə) noun
1. the ability to amuse people; quickness to spot a joke. He has a great sense of humour.
2. the quality of being amusing. the humour of the situation.
verb
to please (someone) by agreeing with him or doing as he wishes. There is no point in telling him he is wrong – just humour him instead.
ˈhumorist noun
a person who writes or tells amusing stories, jokes etc.
ˈhumorous adjective
funny; amusing. a humorous situation/remark.
ˈhumorously adverb
ˈhumorousness noun
-humoured
having, or showing, feelings or a personality of a particular sort. a good-humoured person; an ill-humoured remark.

humour, noun, ends in -our.
humorous, adjective, drops the u.

humour

دُعَابَةٌ humor humor Humor χιούμορ humor huumori humour humor umorismo ユーモア 유머 humor humor humor humor юмор humor อารมณ์ขัน mizah sự hài hước 幽默
References in classic literature ?
How well I remember her laugh; it had in it the same sudden recognition that flashed into her eyes, was a burst of humour, short and intelligent.
Externally, the jollity of aged men has much in common with the mirth of children; the intellect, any more than a deep sense of humour, has little to do with the matter; it is, with both, a gleam that plays upon the surface, and imparts a sunny and cheery aspect alike to the green branch and grey, mouldering trunk.
John Knightley was a tall, gentlemanlike, and very clever man; rising in his profession, domestic, and respectable in his private character; but with reserved manners which prevented his being generally pleasing; and capable of being sometimes out of humour.
They were all in high spirits and good humour, eager to be happy, and determined to submit to the greatest inconveniences and hardships rather than be otherwise.
I bowed and returned the pledge; beginning to perceive that it would be foolish to sit sulking for the misbehaviour of a pack of curs; besides, I felt loth to yield the fellow further amusement at my expense; since his humour took that turn.
I have endeavoured in this Ghostly little book, to raise the Ghost of an Idea, which shall not put my readers out of humour with themselves, with each other, with the season, or with me.
However I might have expressed my comprehension of it at that time, if I had been called upon, I nevertheless did clearly comprehend in my own way, that it was another name for tyranny; and for a certain gloomy, arrogant, devil's humour, that was in them both.
They reached their beasts in low spirits and bad humour enough, knight and squire, Sancho particularly, for with him what touched the stock of money touched his heart, and when any was taken from him he felt as if he was robbed of the apples of his eyes.
A resemblance in good humour and good spirits had recommended her and Lydia to each other, and out of their THREE months' acquaintance they had been intimate TWO.
He is less polished, less insinuating than Mainwaring, and is comparatively deficient in the power of saying those delightful things which put one in good humour with oneself and all the world.
Sometimes he would sit silent and abstracted, taking no notice of anyone; and at others, when he was in a good humour, he would talk in his own halting way.
He was very unorthodox, which frightened them; and his freakish humour excited their disapproval.