hung


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hung

 (hŭng)
v.
Past tense and a past participle of hang. See Usage Note at hang.
adj.
1. Vulgar Slang Having large genitals. Used of a male.
2. Slang
a. Anxious; nervous.
b. Overly involved or preoccupied; hung up.

hung

(hʌŋ)
vb
(Phonetics & Phonology) the usual past tense and past participle of hang
adj
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy)
a. (of a legislative assembly) not having a party with a working majority: a hung parliament.
b. unable to reach a decision: a hung jury.
c. (of a situation) unable to be resolved
2. hung over hungover informal suffering from the effects of a hangover
3. hung up slang
a. impeded by some difficulty or delay
b. in a state of confusion; emotionally disturbed
4. hung up on slang obsessively or exclusively interested in: he's hung up on modern art these days.
Usage: For most senses of hang the past tense and past participle is hung: I hung the curtains; he had hung the new painting on the wall. However, when the meaning is 'to suspend or be suspended by the neck until dead', the past tense and past participle is hanged: the traitors were hanged; they had hanged him at dawn. This form is also used in the idiom I'll be hanged

hung

(hʌŋ)

v.
1. pt. and past part. of hang.
adj.
2. Slang: Usu. Vulgar. (of a male) having large genitals.
Idioms:
1. hung over, suffering from a hangover.
2. hung up, Slang.
a. detained unavoidably.
b. stymied or baffled by a problem.
c. Also, hung-up. beset by psychological problems.
3. hung up on, Slang.
a. obsessed by: a clerk hung up on petty details.
b. infatuated with.
usage: See hang.

Hung.

1. Also, Hung Hungarian.
2. Hungary.
Translations
colgadovergón
gantung
behengtopphengtvelutstyrt
pulos

hung

pret, ptp of hang
adj (inf: sexually) the way he’s hungwie er ausgestattet ist (inf); to be hung like a muleein Riesengehänge haben (inf)

hung

[hʌŋ]
1. pt, pp of hang
2. adj a hung juryuna giuria divisa (sul verdetto)

hang

(hӕŋ) past tense, past participle hung (haŋ) verb
1. to put or fix, or to be put or fixed, above the ground eg by a hook. We'll hang the picture on that wall; The picture is hanging on the wall.
2. to fasten (something), or to be fastened, at the top or side so that it can move freely but cannot fall. A door hangs by its hinges.
3. (past tense, past participle hanged) to kill, or to be killed, by having a rope put round the neck and being allowed to drop. Murderers used to be hanged in the United Kingdom, but no-one hangs for murder now.
4. (often with down or out) to be bending, drooping or falling downwards. The dog's tongue was hanging out; Her hair was hanging down.
5. to bow (one's head). He hung his head in shame.
ˈhanger noun
(usually ˈcoat-hanger) a shaped metal, wooden or plastic frame with a hook on which jackets, dresses etc are hung up.
ˈhanging noun
the (act of) killing a criminal by hanging.
ˈhangings noun plural
curtains or material hung on walls for decoration.
ˈhangman noun
a man whose job it is to hang criminals.
ˈhangover noun
the unpleasant after effects of having had too much alcohol. He woke up with a hangover.
get the hang of
to learn or begin to understand how to do (something). It may seem difficult at first, but you'll get the hang of it after a few weeks.
hang about/around
1. to stand around, doing nothing. I don't like to see all these youths hanging about (street-corners).
2. to be close to (a person) frequently. I don't want you hanging around my daughter.
hang back
to hesitate or be unwilling. The soldiers all hung back when the sergeant asked for volunteers.
hang in the balance
to be in doubt. The success of this project is hanging in the balance.
hang on
1. to wait. Will you hang on a minute – I'm not quite ready.
2. (often with to) to hold. Hang on to that rope.
3. to keep; to retain. He likes to hang on to his money.
hang together
to agree or be consistent. His statements just do not hang together.
hang up
1. to hang (something) on something. Hang up your coat in the cupboard.
2. (often with on) to put the receiver back after a telephone conversation. I tried to talk to her, but she hung up (on me).

She hung the picture up.
The murderer was hanged.

hung

pret & pp de hang
References in classic literature ?
Throwing the rope over the high limb of a giant oak tree, they pulled till the poor Marionette hung far up in space.
He closed his eyes, opened his mouth, stretched out his legs, and hung there, as if he were dead.
Then he clad himself in a friar's gown, and underneath the robe he hung a good broadsword in such a place that he could easily lay hands upon it.
And then was Sir Gawaine ware how there hung a white shield on that tree, and ever as the damsels came by it they spit upon it, and some threw mire upon the shield --"
Ah, said Sir Gawaine, damsels, methinketh ye are to blame, for it is to suppose he that hung that shield there will not be long therefrom, and then may those knights match him on horseback, and that is more your worship than thus; for I will abide no longer to see a knight's shield dishonored.
comrade, is that any reason, because you bored us to death this morning, that you should not be hung this evening?
His coat was hung on a peg, and his boots was under the bed.
Let us leave this armour hung up on some tree, instead of some one that has been hanged; and then with me on Dapple's back and my feet off the ground we will arrange the stages as your worship pleases to measure them out; but to suppose that I am going to travel on foot, and make long ones, is to suppose nonsense.
The mob had insulted him on account of the ostentatious luxury of his wife, whose house was hung with red velvet edged with gold fringe.
The whole passage was hung with portraits of knights in armor, and ladies in silken gowns; and the armor rattled, and the silken gowns rustled
E'en let them do as they are permitted,'' said Wamba; ``I trust no disparagement to your birth that the son of Witless may hang in a chain with as much gravity as the chain hung upon his ancestor the alderman.
All about them the huge-rooted trees blocked their footing, while coiled and knotted climbers, of the girth of a man's arm, were thrown from lofty branch to lofty branch, or hung in tangled masses like so many monstrous snakes.