hunger march

(redirected from hunger marches)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.

hunger march

n
(Sociology) a procession of protest or demonstration by the unemployed
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hunger march - a march of protest or demonstration by the unemployedhunger march - a march of protest or demonstration by the unemployed
march - a procession of people walking together; "the march went up Fifth Avenue"
hunger marcher - an unemployed person who participates in a hunger march
Translations

hunger march

nHungermarsch m
References in periodicals archive ?
He formed a bond with South Wales miners, joining them on a number of hunger marches, and is thought to have been included on the list because of his outspoken opposition to fascist views.
He joined them on hunger marches in 1927 and 1928, and in 1940 starred in the Ealing Studios movie Proud Valley, which told the tale of a black miner who moves to the valleys.
In fact, hunger marches were not uncommon at the time, as workers and families across the country were suddenly hit by the hardship and misery of unemployment as Britain's first industrial boom came to a shuddering halt in the wake of the worldwide Depression.
Similarly, the July 1935 Regina (police) Riot that marked the brutal end of the On-to-Ottawa Trek is familiar to many, but this volume tells the important stories of the Communist-inspired hunger marches in Edmonton and Calgary in 1932.
SINCE the end of the Second World War many people have seen the inter-war period as an age of unmitigated economic failure, marked by mass unemployment, hunger marches, including the famous Jarrow March of 1936, and lengthening dole queues.
Some might have expected the pages of the Stockton and Teesside Herald to be full of hunger marches, unemployment, social deprivation and queues for soup kitchens with the threat from Hitler looming in the background.
Matt said the 26-mile march was inspired by the Hunger Marches of the 1930s and the Spanish miners' march to Madrid last year.
In the 1920s and 1930s his organisation within the Seamen's Vigilance Committees, unemployed demonstrations, and hunger marches from Liverpool became part of a wider cultural force.