hunter-gatherer


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Related to hunter-gatherer: Hunter-gatherer diet

hunt·er-gath·er·er

(hŭn′tər-găth′ər-ər)
n.
A member of a people subsisting in the wild on food obtained by hunting and foraging.

hunter-gatherer

adj
(Anthropology & Ethnology) (of a society, lifestyle, etc) surviving by hunting animals and gathering plants for subsistence
n
(Anthropology & Ethnology) a member of such a society

hunt′er-gath′erer



n.
a member of a group of people who subsist by hunting, fishing, or foraging in the wild.
[1965–70]

hunter-gatherer

A human being depending on the hunting of animals, fishing, and gathering of wild fruits and seeds for survival. Hunter-gatherer societies represent at least 90% of human history.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hunter-gatherer - a member of a hunting and gathering societyhunter-gatherer - a member of a hunting and gathering society
hunting and gathering society, hunting and gathering tribe - group that supports itself by hunting and fishing and by gathering wild fruits and vegetables; usually nomadic
barbarian, savage - a member of an uncivilized people
Translations

hunter-gatherer

nJäger und Sammler m; they were hunters-gathererssie waren Jäger und Sammler
References in periodicals archive ?
Researchers studying two communities living in tropical rainforests have found that while a hunter-gatherer group could easily describe different odours, their plant-growing neighbours floundered - suggesting different ways of finding food could be behind humans' proficiency, or lack of it, when it comes to putting a name to a scent.
Color was a very significant part of hunter-gatherer life and ochre gives you a very vibrant red color," lead study author Andy Needham said in a statement from the (https://www.
In hunter-gatherer villages in the eastern Mediterranean region, house mice were common more than 3,000 years before the earliest known evidence for agriculture, said the findings.
Much is known about the social environment of children living in Western societies, but much less is known about how children are socialized in hunter-gatherer societies.
The site forms a coherent, extensive and high-quality record of ritual practices relating to hunter-gatherer communities in this part of southern Africa over at least 2,000 years, and eloquently illustrates the links between the ritual and economic practices of hunter-gatherers.
Editors Kornfeld and Huckell present readers with a collection of academic articles and scholarly essays covering various aspects of contemporary archaeological research into hunter-gatherer groups covering North America.
Prof Siegel studied hunter-gatherer tribes in South American and Africa, who sleep outside or in crude huts, usually stay awake three to four hours past sunset, by the light of a small fire, most days waking up about an hour before sunrise.
The remains of 27 people from a Stone Age hunter-gatherer culture were unearthed at a site called Nataruk roughly 30 km west of Lake Turkana in northern Kenya.
Not only did stock farmers shift frontiers rapidly and occupy the best land, they also commandeered resources critical to the survival of hunter-gatherer communities.
We left the hunter-gatherer lifestyle behind a very long time ago.
Among their topics are human impacts on oyster resources in Denmark at the transition from Mesolithic to Neolithic, historical ecology and changes in Joman hunter-gatherer lifeways, a historical ecological perspective on early agriculture in the North American southwest and northwest Mexico, flexible core values and subsistence hunting among reservation-era Blackfeet, forging collaborations between ecology and historical ecology, and contingency in the environments of foraging societies.
It concluded that their counterparts in 1800 would have had lifespans that were closer to those of the earliest hunter-gatherer humans than they would to adult men in both countries today.