huntsman


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hunts·man

 (hŭnts′mən)
n.
1. A man who hunts.
2. A man who manages the hounds in the hunting field.

huntsman

(ˈhʌntsmən)
n, pl -men
1. (Hunting) a person who hunts
2. (Hunting) a person who looks after and trains hounds, and manages them during a hunt

hunts•man

(ˈhʌnts mən)

n., pl. -men.
1. the member of a hunt staff who manages the hounds during the hunt.
2. a hunter.
[1560–70]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.huntsman - someone who hunts gamehuntsman - someone who hunts game    
bounty hunter - a hunter who kills predatory wild animals in order to collect a bounty
courser - a huntsman who hunts small animals with fast dogs that use sight rather than scent to follow their prey
deer hunter - hunter of deer
duck hunter - hunter of ducks
falconer, hawker - a person who breeds and trains hawks and who follows the sport of falconry
fowler - someone who hunts wild birds for food
huntress - a woman hunter
lion-hunter - someone who hunts lions
pothunter - someone who hunts for food (not for sport)
skilled worker, skilled workman, trained worker - a worker who has acquired special skills
snarer - someone who sets snares for birds or small animals
stalker - someone who stalks game
tracker - someone who tracks down game
trapper - someone who sets traps for animals (usually to obtain their furs)
Translations
صَيّاد، قَنّاص
lovec
jæger
veiîimaîur

huntsman

[ˈhʌntsmən] N (huntsmen (pl)) (= hunter) → cazador m

huntsman

[ˈhʌntsmən] nchasseur m

huntsman

n pl <-men> → Jagdreiter m

huntsman

[ˈhʌntsmən] n (-men (pl)) → cacciatore m

hunt

(hant) verb
1. to chase (animals etc) for food or for sport. He spent the whole day hunting (deer).
2. to pursue or drive out. The murderer was hunted from town to town.
noun
1. the act of hunting animals etc. a tiger hunt.
2. a search. I'll have a hunt for that lost necklace.
ˈhunterfeminine ˈhuntress noun
a person who hunts.
ˈhunting noun
the activity of chasing animals etc for food or for sport.
ˈhuntsman (ˈhants-) noun
a hunter.
hunt down
to search for (someone or something) until found. The police hunted down the escaped prisoner.
hunt for
to search for. I've been hunting for that shoe all morning.
hunt high and low
to search everywhere.
hunt out
to search for (something that has been put away) until it is found. I'll hunt out that old photograph for you.
References in classic literature ?
A beautiful air ran through the music, without ceasing, sometimes loud and strong, sometimes so soft that it could hardly be distinguished--but it was always there; it swung grandly along through the shrill whistling of the storm-wind, the rattling patter of the rain, and the boom and crash of the thunder; it wound soft and low through the lesser sounds, the distant ones, such as the throbbing of the convent bell, the melodious winding of the hunter's horn, the distressed bayings of his dogs, and the solemn chanting of the monks; it rose again, with a jubilant ring, and mingled itself with the country songs and dances of the peasants assembled in the convent hall to cheer up the rescued huntsman while he ate his supper.
The hind led her fawn from the covert of high fern to the more open walks of the greenwood, and no huntsman was there to watch or intercept the stately hart, as he paced at the head of the antler'd herd.
One day the huntsman roused a stag, and the prince, thinking that the vizir was behind, gave chase, and rode so hard that he found himself alone.
But what is the right of a huntsman to the forest of a thousand miles over which he has accidentally ranged in quest of prey?
These words were said by a huntsman peacefully seated at the edge of the forest of Ile-Adam, who was finishing an Havana cigar while waiting for his companion, who had lost his way in the tangled underbrush of the wood.
he knows how to crunch fowls, to dodge the huntsman and to find his way home by day or by night, that's all.
Here comes a huntsman out of the woods, dragging a bear which he has shot, and shouting to the neighbors to lend him a hand.
The squires of Idomeneus spoiled him of his armour, while Menelaus, son of Atreus, killed Scamandrius the son of Strophius, a mighty huntsman and keen lover of the chase.
For one reason; Farag, the kennel huntsman, in khaki and puttees, would obey nothing under the rank of an Excellency, and the hounds would obey no one but Farag; for another, the best way of estimating crop returns and revenue was by riding straight to hounds; for a third, though Judges down the river issued signed and sealed land-titles to all lawful owners, yet public opinion along the river never held any such title valid till it had been confirmed, according to precedent, by the Governor's hunting crop in the hunting field, above the wilfully neglected earth.
When these men heard the tailor speaking thus, they were overcome by a great dread, and ran as if the wild huntsman were behind them, and none of them would venture anything further against him.
He told her of horses which he had bought for a trifle and sold for incredible sums; of racing matches, in which his judgment had infallibly foretold the winner; of shooting parties, in which he had killed more birds (though without having one good shot) than all his companions together; and described to her some famous day's sport, with the fox-hounds, in which his foresight and skill in directing the dogs had repaired the mistakes of the most experienced huntsman, and in which the boldness of his riding, though it had never endangered his own life for a moment, had been constantly leading others into difficulties, which he calmly concluded had broken the necks of many.
Besides, we take provision for two months with us, after all; and there is nothing to prevent our skilful huntsman here from furnishing game in abundance when we come to alight.