hurdle


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hur·dle

 (hûr′dl)
n.
1. Sports
a. A light portable barrier over which competitors must leap in certain races.
b. hurdles A race in which a series of such barriers must be jumped without the competitors' breaking their stride.
c. A leaping step made off one foot as means of maximizing spring at the end of an approach, as to a dive.
2. An obstacle or difficulty to be overcome: the last hurdle before graduation.
3. Chiefly British A portable framework made of intertwined branches or wattle and used for temporary fencing.
4. Chiefly British A frame or sledge on which condemned persons were dragged to execution.
v. hur·dled, hur·dling, hur·dles
v.tr.
1. To leap over (a barrier) in or as if in a race.
2. To overcome or deal with successfully; surmount: hurdle a problem.
v.intr.
To leap over a barrier or other obstacle.

[Middle English hurdel, portable panel for temporary fences, from Old English hyrdel.]

hur′dler n.

hurdle

(ˈhɜːdəl)
n
1. (Athletics (Track & Field)) athletics one of a number of light barriers over which runners leap in certain events
2. (Horse Racing) a low barrier used in certain horse races
3. an obstacle to be overcome
4. (Agriculture) a light framework of interlaced osiers, wattle, etc, used as a temporary fence
5. (Historical Terms) Brit a sledge on which criminals were dragged to their executions
vb
6. (Athletics (Track & Field)) to jump (a hurdle, etc), as in racing
7. (tr) to surround with hurdles
8. (tr) to overcome
[Old English hyrdel; related to Gothic haurds door, Old Norse hurth door, Old High German hurd, Latin crātis, Greek kurtos basket]
ˈhurdler n

hur•dle

(ˈhɜr dl)

n., v. -dled, -dling. n.
1. a portable fencelike barrier over which contestants must leap in certain running races.
2. hurdles, (used with a sing. v.) a track race in which contestants leap over a series of such barriers.
3. any of various upright barriers over which horses must jump in certain turf races, as steeplechases, esp. an artificial barrier.
4. a difficulty to be overcome; obstacle.
5. Chiefly Brit. a movable rectangular frame of interlaced twigs, crossed bars, or the like, as for a temporary fence.
6. a frame or sled on which criminals, esp. traitors, were formerly drawn to the place of execution.
v.t.
7. to leap over (a barrier), as in a race.
8. to master (a difficulty, problem, etc.); overcome.
[before 900; Middle English hirdel, hurdel, Old English hyrdel=hyrd- (c. Old Saxon hurth, Old High German hurt hurdle, Old Norse hurth, Gothic haurds door) + -el n. suffix; akin to Latin crātis wickerwork (compare grate1)]
hur′dler, n.

hurdle


Past participle: hurdled
Gerund: hurdling

Imperative
hurdle
hurdle
Present
I hurdle
you hurdle
he/she/it hurdles
we hurdle
you hurdle
they hurdle
Preterite
I hurdled
you hurdled
he/she/it hurdled
we hurdled
you hurdled
they hurdled
Present Continuous
I am hurdling
you are hurdling
he/she/it is hurdling
we are hurdling
you are hurdling
they are hurdling
Present Perfect
I have hurdled
you have hurdled
he/she/it has hurdled
we have hurdled
you have hurdled
they have hurdled
Past Continuous
I was hurdling
you were hurdling
he/she/it was hurdling
we were hurdling
you were hurdling
they were hurdling
Past Perfect
I had hurdled
you had hurdled
he/she/it had hurdled
we had hurdled
you had hurdled
they had hurdled
Future
I will hurdle
you will hurdle
he/she/it will hurdle
we will hurdle
you will hurdle
they will hurdle
Future Perfect
I will have hurdled
you will have hurdled
he/she/it will have hurdled
we will have hurdled
you will have hurdled
they will have hurdled
Future Continuous
I will be hurdling
you will be hurdling
he/she/it will be hurdling
we will be hurdling
you will be hurdling
they will be hurdling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hurdling
you have been hurdling
he/she/it has been hurdling
we have been hurdling
you have been hurdling
they have been hurdling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hurdling
you will have been hurdling
he/she/it will have been hurdling
we will have been hurdling
you will have been hurdling
they will have been hurdling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hurdling
you had been hurdling
he/she/it had been hurdling
we had been hurdling
you had been hurdling
they had been hurdling
Conditional
I would hurdle
you would hurdle
he/she/it would hurdle
we would hurdle
you would hurdle
they would hurdle
Past Conditional
I would have hurdled
you would have hurdled
he/she/it would have hurdled
we would have hurdled
you would have hurdled
they would have hurdled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hurdle - a light movable barrier that competitors must leap over in certain raceshurdle - a light movable barrier that competitors must leap over in certain races
barrier - a structure or object that impedes free movement
2.hurdle - an obstacle that you are expected to overcome; "the last hurdle before graduation"
obstacle, obstruction - something immaterial that stands in the way and must be circumvented or surmounted; "lack of imagination is an obstacle to one's advancement"; "the poverty of a district is an obstacle to good education"; "the filibuster was a major obstruction to the success of their plan"
3.hurdle - the act of jumping over an obstaclehurdle - the act of jumping over an obstacle
jumping, jump - the act of jumping; propelling yourself off the ground; "he advanced in a series of jumps"; "the jumping was unexpected"
Verb1.hurdle - jump a hurdle
athletics, sport - an active diversion requiring physical exertion and competition
vault, overleap - jump across or leap over (an obstacle)

hurdle

noun
1. obstacle, block, difficulty, barrier, handicap, hazard, complication, snag, uphill (S. African), obstruction, stumbling block, impediment, hindrance The weather will be the biggest hurdle.
2. fence, wall, hedge, block, barrier, barricade The horse dived at the hurdle and clipped the top.
verb
1. overcome, beat, master, conquer, surmount He earns a living helping others hurdle tough challenges.

hurdle

noun
Something that impedes or prevents entry or passage:
verb
1. To pass by or over safely or successfully:
2. To move off the ground by a muscular effort of the legs and feet:
Translations
حاجِزعَرْقَلَةٌعَقَبَهيَشْتَرِك في سِباق حَواجِز
překážkaběžet v překážkovém běhu
forhindringløbe hækkeløbvanskelighed
este
prepreka
akadályátviszgátgátfutásban vesz résztkarám
grind; hindrunhindrun, erfiîleikarhlaupa grindahlaup
ハードル障害物
장애물
bėgimas per kliūtisdalyvauti kliūtinėse lenktynėselenktynių su kliūtimis dalyvis
barjerakavēklispiedalīties barjerskrējienāšķērslis
bežať prekážkový beh
häck
อุปสรรค
engelengelli yarışta koşmakmaniasorun
rào cản

hurdle

[ˈhɜːdl]
A. N (Sport) → valla f (fig) → obstáculo m, barrera f
the 100m hurdles (= race) → los 100 metros vallas
the high hurdleslas vallas altas
to fall at the first hurdlefracasar a las primeras de cambio, no superar el primer escollo
B. CPD hurdle race Ncarrera f de vallas

hurdle

[ˈhɜːrdəl] n
(= hindrance) → obstacle m
(SPORT)haie f
(for fences)claie f

hurdle

n (Sport, fig) → Hürde f; hurdles sing (= race)Hürdenlauf m; (Horse Racing) → Hürdenrennen nt; the 100m hurdles(die) 100 m Hürden, (der) 100-m-Hürdenlauf; to fall at the first hurdle (fig)(schon) über die erste or bei der ersten Hürde stolpern
vt fencenehmen
viHürdenlauf machen; hurdlingder Hürdenlauf

hurdle

[ˈhɜːdl] n (for fence) → graticcio (fig) (Sport) → ostacolo
the 100 metre hurdles (race) → i cento metri a ostacoli

hurdle

(ˈhəːdl) noun
1. a frame to be jumped in a race.
2. a problem or difficulty. There are several hurdles to be got over in this project.
verb
to run in a race in which hurdles are used. He has hurdled since he was twelve.
ˈhurdler noun
ˈhurdling noun

hurdle

عَرْقَلَةٌ překážka forhindring Hürde εμπόδιο obstáculo este obstacle prepreka ostacolo ハードル 장애물 horde hekk przeszkoda barreira препятствие häck อุปสรรค engel rào cản 障碍

hurdle

n. obstáculo.
References in classic literature ?
and on she went, and cleared the last hurdle solitary and alone, the army letting loose the grand yell, and she skipped from the horse the same as if he had been standing still, and made her bow, and everybody crowded around to congratulate, and they gave her the bugle, and she put it to her lips and blew 'boots and saddles' to see how it would go, and BB was as proud as you can't think
returned the man, with a relish; "he'll be drawn on a hurdle to be half hanged, and then he'll be taken down and sliced before his own face, and then his inside will be taken out and burnt while he looks on, and then his head will be chopped off, and he'll be cut into quarters.
As he got there the day began to dawn, and he leaned over a hurdle and beheld the shadows flee away.
He flashed a glance at the door, saw that the open window was nearer, went out of it with a flying leap, as if over a hurdle, and went racing across the turf, in the track of the disappearing policeman.
At this occupation they could shelter themselves by a thatched hurdle if it rained; but if it was frosty even their thick leather gloves could not prevent the frozen masses they handled from biting their fingers.
The Prince, riding a little apart, simply ignored the hurdle, and the mare took it in her stride.
Her training warned her of peril and of wrong, subtle, mysterious, luring; while her instincts rang clarion-voiced through her being, impelling her to hurdle caste and place and gain to this traveller from another world, to this uncouth young fellow with lacerated hands and a line of raw red caused by the unaccustomed linen at his throat, who, all too evidently, was soiled and tainted by ungracious existence.
She will not even remind you that he was once your model of manly beauty, too--that you waved your handkerchief till you could wave it no longer, when he took his seat, with the others, in the boat--that your heart was like to jump out of your bosom, on that later occasion when he leaped the last hurdle at the foot-race, and won it by a head.
They tried to get him along, but couldn't; so they chartered a hurdle and two men to carry him.
In the meantime, under the surgeon's directions, some men brought a hurdle, on which others made a thick bed of spare clothes covered with loose straw, while he himself contrived some bandages and slings from shawls and handkerchiefs.
He fenced the raft all round with wicker hurdles as a protection against the waves, and then he threw on a quantity of wood.
I did the hurdles over two or three garden-walls, but so did the flyer who was on my tracks, and he drove me back into the straight and down to High Street like any lamplighter.