hurricane


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hurricane
cutaway depiction of a hurricane

hur·ri·cane

 (hûr′ĭ-kān′)
n.
1. A severe tropical cyclone having winds greater than 64 knots (74 miles per hour; 119 kilometers per hour), originating in the equatorial regions of the Atlantic Ocean or Caribbean Sea or eastern regions of the Pacific Ocean, traveling north, northwest, or northeast from its point of origin, and usually involving heavy rains.
2. A wind with a speed greater than 64 knots (74 miles per hour; 119 kilometers per hour per hour), according to the Beaufort scale.
3. Something resembling a hurricane in force or speed.

[Spanish huracán, from Taíno hurákan; akin to Arawak kulakani, thunder.]

hurricane

(ˈhʌrɪkən; -keɪn)
n
1. (Physical Geography) a severe, often destructive storm, esp a tropical cyclone
2. (Physical Geography)
a. a wind of force 12 or above on the Beaufort scale
b. (as modifier): a wind of hurricane force.
3. anything acting like such a wind
[C16: from Spanish huracán, from Taino hurakán, from hura wind]

hur•ri•cane

(ˈhɜr ɪˌkeɪn, ˈhʌr-; esp. Brit. -kən)

n.
1. a violent, tropical, cyclonic storm, esp. of the W North Atlantic, having wind speeds of or in excess of 74 mph (33 m/sec).
2. anything suggesting a violent storm.
[1545–55; < Sp huracán < Taino hurakán]
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hurricane
A hurricane forms when clusters of thunderstorms converge over warm water. Warm, moist air is drawn up into the clouds, creating tunnels as the air rises. The strongest winds and heaviest rains center around the eye of the storm, while the eye itself remains calm.

hur·ri·cane

(hûr′ĭ-kān′)
A severe, rotating tropical storm with heavy rains and cyclonic winds exceeding 74 miles (119 kilometers) per hour. Hurricanes originate in the tropical parts of the Atlantic Ocean or the Caribbean Sea and move generally northward. They lose force when they move over land or colder ocean waters. See Note at cyclone.

hurricane

a extremely strong wind, usually accompanied by foul weather, more than 65 knots on the Beaufort scale.
See also: Wind

hurricane

A severe tropical storm rated 12 on the Beaufort scale.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hurricane - a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)hurricane - a severe tropical cyclone usually with heavy rains and winds moving a 73-136 knots (12 on the Beaufort scale)
cyclone - a violent rotating windstorm
Beaufort scale, wind scale - an international scale of wind force from 0 (calm air) to 12 (hurricane)

hurricane

noun storm, gale, tornado, cyclone, typhoon, tempest, twister (U.S. informal), windstorm, willy-willy (Austral.) People have been killed in the hurricane's destructive path.
Translations
hurikánuragán
orkan
uragano
hirmumyrskyhurrikaani
uragan
hurrikán
fellibylur; fárviîri
ハリケーン大暴風暴風暴風雨
허리케인
uraganas
orkānsviesuļvētra
uragán
orkan
orkan
พายุเฮอร์ริเคน
cuồng phong

hurricane

[ˈhʌrɪkən]
A. N (Met) → huracán m
B. CPD hurricane lamp Nlámpara f a prueba de viento

hurricane

[ˈhʌrɪkeɪn ˈhʌrɪkən] nouragan m
hurricane Charley → l'ouragan Charleyhurricane-force wind nvent m de force 12hurricane lamp nlampe-tempête fhurricane season nsaison f des cycloneshurricane warning nalerte f cyclonique

hurricane

nOrkan m; (tropical) → Hurrikan m; hurricane forceOrkanstärke f

hurricane

[ˈhʌrɪkən] nuragano

hurricane

(ˈharikən) , ((American) ˈhə:rikein) noun
a violent storm with winds blowing at over 120 kilometres per hour.

hurricane

إِعْصَّارٌ hurikán orkan Orkan τυφώνας huracán hirmumyrsky ouragan uragan uragano ハリケーン 허리케인 orkaan orkan huragan furacão ураган orkan พายุเฮอร์ริเคน kasırga cuồng phong 飓风

hurricane

n huracán m
References in classic literature ?
It really was a violent storm, approaching a hurricane in force, and at one time it seemed as though the craft, having been heeled far over under a staggering wave that swept her decks, would not come back to an even keel.
For example, sir, in a dark, low, cross-beamed, panelled room of an old house, let us suppose a dead man, sitting in an arm-chair, with a blood-stain on his shirt-bosom, --and let us add to our hypothesis another man, issuing from the house, which he feels to be over-filled with the dead man's presence,--and let us lastly imagine him fleeing, Heaven knows whither, at the speed of a hurricane, by railroad
As in the hurricane that sweeps the plain, men fly the neighborhood of some lone, gigantic elm, whose very height and strength but render it so much the more unsafe, because so much the more a mark for thunderbolts; so at those last words of ahab's many of the mariners did run from him in a terror of dismay.
Though her mode of doing everything was peculiarly meandering and circuitous, and without any sort of calculation as to time and place,--though her kitchen generally looked as if it had been arranged by a hurricane blowing through it, and she had about as many places for each cooking utensil as there were days in the year,--yet, if one would have patience to wait her own good time, up would come her dinner in perfect order, and in a style of preparation with which an epicure could find no fault.
The shining Bull's Eye of the Court was gone, or it would have been the mark for a hurricane of national bullets.
I took ship at a distant seaport, and for some time all went well, but at last, being caught in a violent hurricane, our vessel became a total wreck in spite of all our worthy captain could do to save her, and many of our company perished in the waves.
He sat astride on the goat, struck his heels into its side, and went rattling down the high-road like a hurricane.
This hurricane of human beings, the flux and reflux of living bodies, had the effect of leaving for a few short moments the whole bank of the Beresina deserted.
The Astrolabe and the Zelee, incessantly tossed about by the hurricane, could not be worth the Nautilus, quiet repository of labour that she is, truly motionless in the midst of the waters.
She howled as the hurricane howled; and her voice was lost in the great voice of nature, which also seemed to groan with despair.
This child of the desert was in his element, and with his black face and sparkling eyes appeared, in the cloud of dust he raised, like the genius of the simoom and the god of the hurricane.
He let go the helm, and the force of the hurricane was so great that it broke the mast half way up, and both sail and yard went over into the sea.