hurries


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hur·ry

 (hûr′ē, hŭr′-)
v. hur·ried, hur·ry·ing, hur·ries
v.intr.
To move or act with speed or haste. See Synonyms at speed.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move or act with speed or haste: hurried the children to school.
2. To cause to move or act with undue haste; rush: was hurried into marriage.
3. To speed the progress or completion of; expedite: hurried the delivery of the product.
n. pl. hur·ries
1. Activity or motion that is often unduly hurried; haste: I forgot my gloves in my hurry to catch the bus. See Synonyms at haste.
2. The need or wish to hurry; a condition of urgency: in no hurry to leave.

[Possibly Middle English horien, perhaps variant of harien, to harass; see harry.]

hur′ri·er n.
References in classic literature ?
Shelby hastily drew the bills of sale towards him, and signed them, like a man that hurries over some disagreeable business, and then pushed them over with the money.
She hurries to him, and they go on together, walking up and down, walking up and down, until he is composed.
Thou and I are but the blind instruments of some irresistible fatality, that hurries us along, like goodly vessels driving before the storm, which are dashed against each other, and so perish.
She dips her rim, She sinks, she founders in the mist; and still The stream flows on, and to the insatiate sea Hurries her white-wave flocks innumerable In never-ending tale.
Little dreaming of the doom to which his first backward step devotes him, he hurries away, breathless with agitation hitherto unfelt, and hardly dares turn his head at the distant corner.
Up the valleys of Bushahr - the far-beholding eagles of the Himalayas swerve at his new blue-and-white gored umbrella - hurries a Bengali, once fat and well-looking, now lean and weather-worn.