hurrying


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hur·ry

 (hûr′ē, hŭr′-)
v. hur·ried, hur·ry·ing, hur·ries
v.intr.
To move or act with speed or haste. See Synonyms at speed.
v.tr.
1. To cause to move or act with speed or haste: hurried the children to school.
2. To cause to move or act with undue haste; rush: was hurried into marriage.
3. To speed the progress or completion of; expedite: hurried the delivery of the product.
n. pl. hur·ries
1. Activity or motion that is often unduly hurried; haste: I forgot my gloves in my hurry to catch the bus. See Synonyms at haste.
2. The need or wish to hurry; a condition of urgency: in no hurry to leave.

[Possibly Middle English horien, perhaps variant of harien, to harass; see harry.]

hur′ri·er n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hurrying - changing location rapidlyhurrying - changing location rapidly    
movement, move, motion - the act of changing location from one place to another; "police controlled the motion of the crowd"; "the movement of people from the farms to the cities"; "his move put him directly in my path"
speedup, acceleration, quickening - the act of accelerating; increasing the speed
deceleration - the act of decelerating; decreasing the speed; "he initiated deceleration by braking"
scud, scudding - the act of moving along swiftly (as before a gale)
Adj.1.hurrying - moving with great haste; "affection for this hurrying driving...little man"; "lashed the scurrying horses"
fast - acting or moving or capable of acting or moving quickly; "fast film"; "on the fast track in school"; "set a fast pace"; "a fast car"
References in classic literature ?
cried the boy, hurrying from the next room whither he had withdrawn, feeling that their first sorrow was too sacred for even his friendly eyes to see.
I'll see them," he muttered, hurrying along the street, and bowing politely to the right and left at the people walking past.
Few people were abroad, and each one of them was hurrying toward a fire.
Early upon the morning following those hours passed in Arobin's society, Edna set about securing her new abode and hurrying her arrangements for occupying it.
The words were still ringing in her ears, when he suddenly passed away, with the hurrying crowd.
Start up, then, and, hurrying through the streets, burst in upon the company, that they may begin before the fish is spoiled
The moment that he did so, there came what seemed a tumultuous rush of new life, other life than his own pouring like a torrent into his heart, and hurrying through all his veins, as if the mother and the child were communicating their vital warmth to his half-torpid system.
It is said by some to be the ghost of a Hessian trooper, whose head had been carried away by a cannon-ball, in some nameless battle during the Revolutionary War, and who is ever and anon seen by the country folk hurrying along in the gloom of night, as if on the wings of the wind.
It was only a question of hurrying again, for a few preparations, to the house which the attendance at church of so many of the servants would practically have left unoccupied.
not only were the old sails being mended, but new sails were coming on board, and bolts of canvas, and coils of rigging; in short, everything betokened that the ship's preparations were hurrying to a close.
As marching armies approaching an unfriendly defile in the mountains, accelerate their march, all eagerness to place that perilous passage in their rear, and once more expand in comparative security upon the plain; even so did this vast fleet of whales now seem hurrying forward through the straits; gradually contracting the wings of their semicircle, and swimming on, in one solid, but still crescentic centre.
The farmer was hurrying out into the road, and his wife was standing at the gate, looking very frightened.