hurtle


Also found in: Thesaurus, Idioms.

hur·tle

 (hûr′tl)
v. hur·tled, hur·tling, hur·tles
v.intr.
To move with or as if with great speed: an express train that hurtled past.
v.tr.
To fling with great force; hurl.

[Middle English hurtlen, to collide, frequentative of hurten, to knock against, damage; see hurt.]

hurtle

(ˈhɜːtəl)
vb
1. to project or be projected very quickly, noisily, or violently
2. (intr) rare to collide or crash
[C13 hurtlen, from hurten to strike; see hurt1]

hur•tle

(ˈhɜr tl)

v. -tled, -tling,
n. v.i.
1. to move with great speed.
2. Archaic. to strike together; collide.
v.t.
3. to drive violently; fling; dash.
n.
4. Archaic. clash; collision; clatter.
[1175–1225; Middle English hurtle=hurt(en) (see hurt) + -le -le]

Hurtle

 a flock of sheep.

hurtle


Past participle: hurtled
Gerund: hurtling

Imperative
hurtle
hurtle
Present
I hurtle
you hurtle
he/she/it hurtles
we hurtle
you hurtle
they hurtle
Preterite
I hurtled
you hurtled
he/she/it hurtled
we hurtled
you hurtled
they hurtled
Present Continuous
I am hurtling
you are hurtling
he/she/it is hurtling
we are hurtling
you are hurtling
they are hurtling
Present Perfect
I have hurtled
you have hurtled
he/she/it has hurtled
we have hurtled
you have hurtled
they have hurtled
Past Continuous
I was hurtling
you were hurtling
he/she/it was hurtling
we were hurtling
you were hurtling
they were hurtling
Past Perfect
I had hurtled
you had hurtled
he/she/it had hurtled
we had hurtled
you had hurtled
they had hurtled
Future
I will hurtle
you will hurtle
he/she/it will hurtle
we will hurtle
you will hurtle
they will hurtle
Future Perfect
I will have hurtled
you will have hurtled
he/she/it will have hurtled
we will have hurtled
you will have hurtled
they will have hurtled
Future Continuous
I will be hurtling
you will be hurtling
he/she/it will be hurtling
we will be hurtling
you will be hurtling
they will be hurtling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hurtling
you have been hurtling
he/she/it has been hurtling
we have been hurtling
you have been hurtling
they have been hurtling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hurtling
you will have been hurtling
he/she/it will have been hurtling
we will have been hurtling
you will have been hurtling
they will have been hurtling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hurtling
you had been hurtling
he/she/it had been hurtling
we had been hurtling
you had been hurtling
they had been hurtling
Conditional
I would hurtle
you would hurtle
he/she/it would hurtle
we would hurtle
you would hurtle
they would hurtle
Past Conditional
I would have hurtled
you would have hurtled
he/she/it would have hurtled
we would have hurtled
you would have hurtled
they would have hurtled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.hurtle - move with or as if with a rushing sound; "The cars hurtled by"
go, locomote, move, travel - change location; move, travel, or proceed, also metaphorically; "How fast does your new car go?"; "We travelled from Rome to Naples by bus"; "The policemen went from door to door looking for the suspect"; "The soldiers moved towards the city in an attempt to take it before night fell"; "news travelled fast"
2.hurtle - make a thrusting forward movement
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
dart - move with sudden speed; "His forefinger darted in all directions as he spoke"
riposte - make a return thrust; "his opponent riposted"
3.hurtle - throw forcefully
dash, crash - hurl or thrust violently; "He dashed the plate against the wall"; "Waves were dashing against the rock"
precipitate - hurl or throw violently; "The bridge broke and precipitated the train into the river below"
throw - propel through the air; "throw a frisbee"
sling, catapult - hurl as if with a sling
bowl - hurl a cricket ball from one end of the pitch towards the batsman at the other end

hurtle

verb rush, charge, race, shoot, fly, speed, tear, crash, plunge, barrel (along) (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), scramble, spurt, stampede, scoot, burn rubber (informal), rush headlong, go hell for leather (informal) A pretty young girl came hurtling down the stairs.

hurtle

verb
1. To send through the air with a motion of the hand or arm:
Informal: fire.
2. To launch with great force:
Idiom: let fly.
Translations
يَهْوي، يَرْتَطِم
řítit se
farestyrte
òeytast, hendast
lėkti
brāztiesdrāzties
hızla fırlamak/gitmek

hurtle

[ˈhɜːtl]
A. VIprecipitarse
to hurtle alongir como un rayo or a toda velocidad
the car hurtled pastel coche pasó como un rayo or a toda velocidad
the rock hurtled over the cliffla roca cayó estrepitosamente por el precipicio
B. VTarrojar (violentamente)

hurtle

[ˈhɜːrtəl] vi
to hurtle past → passer en trombe
to hurtle down → dégringoler
hurtle along
vt fuspasser à toute allure

hurtle

virasen; the car was hurtling alongdas Auto sauste or brauste dahin; it hurtled into the walles sauste gegen die Mauer; he came hurtling round the cornerer kam um die Ecke gerast

hurtle

[ˈhɜːtl]
1. visfrecciare
to hurtle past/down → passare/scendere a razzo
she hurtled down the stairs → si è precipitata giù per le scale
2. vtscagliare

hurtle

(ˈhəːtl) verb
to move very quickly and violently. The car hurtled down the hill at top speed.
References in classic literature ?
There was a quick leap, and the Belgian felt a heavy body hurtle onto the rump of his terror-stricken mount.
She saw a heavy hunting spear hurtle through the air to meet the lion in midleap.
It was one of the nights when the storm-wind hurtles over the frozen meadows and black hollows, and moans around the eaves like a lost creature, and drives the snow sharply against the shaking panes.
Consequently the craft will simply hurtle past, gathering data and taking pictures of Pluto and its moons Charon, Styx, Nix, Kerberos and Hydra.
Summary: The Premier League continued to hurtle towards its closest three-way finish for years on Wednesday as Chelsea thumped Portsmouth 5-0 away.
The spacecraft will hurtle 80 miles into space, rising vertically and reaching Mach 1 (600 mph) in less than 10 seconds, ultimately traveling at three times the speed of sound.
Built specifically for the high-adrenaline sport of downhill (DH to those in the know), mountain bike racing, in which riders hurtle down snowless black diamond-level ski slopes at ridiculous speeds, the bike features an honest-to-goodness transmission in place of the usual gears and derailleur setup.
Central Park is a place where "softballs shuttle, Frisbees wobble and epithets hurtle.
I am quite prepared to put up with young children - say under 10 - cycling on the pavements for safety reasons, but more often than not it is teenagers and adults who hurtle towards you at 20mph without so much as a ring of a bell to let you know they're there.
Why, then, was I never able to hurtle my eyeballs through the bylined columns Greenfield wrote for Newsweek and The Washington Post?
From the deck of the bar at Montana Snow-bowl, 12 miles west of Missoula, you can eat homemade pizza and watch 30 ski jumpers hurtle themselves as far as 200 feet.
Hurtle Parrot owes pounds 150,000 after cancelling a show at the Duke of Hamilton's Lennoxlove House estate in August.