husky

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husk·y 1

 (hŭs′kē)
adj. husk·i·er, husk·i·est
1. Hoarse or rough in quality: a voice husky with emotion.
2.
a. Resembling a husk.
b. Containing husks.

[From husk.]

husk′i·ly adv.

husk·y 2

 (hŭs′kē)
adj. husk·i·er, husk·i·est
1. Strongly built; burly.
2. Heavily built: clothing sizes for husky boys.
n. pl. husk·ies
A husky person.

[Perhaps from husk.]

hus·ky 3

also hus·kie  (hŭs′kē)
n. pl. hus·kies
A dog of any of various compact, thick-coated Arctic breeds developed as sled dogs, especially the Siberian husky.

[Probably from shortening and alteration of Eskimo.]

husky

(ˈhʌskɪ)
adj, huskier or huskiest
1. (of a voice, an utterance, etc) slightly hoarse or rasping
2. of, like, or containing husks
3. informal big, strong, and well-built
[C19: probably from husk, from the toughness of a corn husk]
ˈhuskily adv
ˈhuskiness n

husky

(ˈhʌskɪ)
n, pl huskies
1. (Breeds) a breed of Arctic sled dog with a thick dense coat, pricked ears, and a curled tail
2. (Peoples) slang
a. a member of the Inuit people
b. the Inuit language
[C19: probably based on Eskimo]

husk•y1

(ˈhʌs ki)

adj. husk•i•er, husk•i•est. adj.
1. big and strong; burly; brawny.
2. (of the voice) somewhat hoarse, as when affected with a cold.
3. like, covered with, or full of husks.
n.
4. a size of garments for boys who are heavier than average.
5. a garment in this size.
[1545–55; husk + -y1]
husk′i•ly, adv.
husk′i•ness, n.

husk•y2

(ˈhʌs ki)

n., pl. husk•ies.
a big, brawny person.

husk•y3

(ˈhʌs ki)

n., pl. husk•ies. (sometimes cap.)
[1870–75; by ellipsis from husky dog, husky breed; compare Newfoundland and Labrador dial. Husky a Labrador Inuit, earlier Huskemaw, Uskemaw, ultimately < the same Algonquian source as Eskimo]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.husky - breed of heavy-coated Arctic sled doghusky - breed of heavy-coated Arctic sled dog
working dog - any of several breeds of usually large powerful dogs bred to work as draft animals and guard and guide dogs
Adj.1.husky - muscular and heavily builthusky - muscular and heavily built; "a beefy wrestler"; "had a tall burly frame"; "clothing sizes for husky boys"; "a strapping boy of eighteen"; "`buirdly' is a Scottish term"
Scotland - one of the four countries that make up the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland; located on the northern part of the island of Great Britain; famous for bagpipes and plaids and kilts
robust - sturdy and strong in form, constitution, or construction; "a robust body"; "a robust perennial"
2.husky - deep and harsh sounding as if from shouting or illness or emotion; "gruff voices"; "the dog's gruff barking"; "hoarse cries"; "makes all the instruments sound powerful but husky"- Virgil Thomson
cacophonic, cacophonous - having an unpleasant sound; "as cacophonous as a henyard"- John McCarten

husky

adjective
1. hoarse, rough, harsh, raucous, rasping, croaking, gruff, throaty, guttural, croaky His voice was husky with grief.
2. (Informal) muscular, powerful, strapping, rugged, hefty, burly, stocky, beefy (informal), brawny, thickset a very husky young man, built like a football player

husky 1

adjective
Low and grating in sound:

husky 2

adjective
1. Characterized by marked muscular development; powerfully built:
2. Having a large body, especially in girth:
Translations
أجَش، أبَحكَلْب الأسكيمو
chraplavýeskymácký pes
hæsslædehund
eskimóahundur, sleîahundurrámur
aizsmaciseskimosu suns
eskimácky pes
boğukEskimo köpeğikısık

husky

1 [ˈhʌskɪ] ADJ (huskier (compar) (huskiest (superl)))
1. [voice, person] → ronco
2. (= tough) [person] → fornido, fuerte

husky

2 [ˈhʌskɪ] Nperro m esquimal

husky

[ˈhʌski]
adj
[voice] → rauque
(= burly) → costaud(e)
nhusky m

husky

1
adj (+er)
rau, belegt; singer’s voicerauh, rauchig; (= hoarse)heiser; his voice was husky with emotionseine Stimme war heiser vor Erregung
(= sturdy) personstämmig

husky

2
n (= dog)Schlittenhund m

husky

1 [ˈhʌskɪ] adj (-ier (comp) (-iest (superl))) (voice) → roco/a; (tough, person) → ben piantato/a

husky

2 [ˈhʌskɪ] n (-ies (pl)) → husky m inv, cane m eschimese

husky1

(ˈhaski) adjective
(of a voice) rough in sound and difficult to hear. You sound husky – have you a cold?
ˈhuskiness noun
ˈhuskily adverb

husky2

(ˈhaski) plural ˈhuskies noun
a North American dog used for pulling sledges.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stunning songstress behind such '80s hits as 'Almost Over You,' 'Telefone' and 'For Your Eyes Only' is already 58 years old, but the huskier quality of her 'maturing' voice lends texture and depth to her prodigious performing ability.
Many of the birds around his home were resident Canadas, big birds with deeper, huskier voices.
Huskier men look best in solid colors; the gingham shirt doesn't work at all.
His voice is deeper, huskier, sometimes cracked now (it does his songs no harm at all) and on a luminous People Get Ready, it also fills out, resonates.
Taking in tracks from right across her long career, the singer was in fine voice, huskier than she used to be but still capable of hitting the high notes as and when required.
Initially, upon the release of her 2004 debut LP Milk Eyed Mender, a mix of Kate Bush and a little girl gone mad ingesting helium balloons at her sixth birthday party - her vocals have since deepened, become huskier and richer.
There were covers of numbers like Maybe This Time from Cabaret, the Gershwins' They All Laughed and the world weary Sinatra classic One More for the Road, Tony's huskier tones imbuing them with his own heartfelt emotion.
Her voice is huskier now, but like the great artist she is, she knows where to breathe, how to hold back, when to let go.
The piercing scream of the old V8 engine has gone and in its place we now have a huskier tone, complete with whistles and whirrs from the 1.
Mercedes's e1/4416,500 ($569,600) SLS AMG Coupe Electric Drive has huskier tones to reflect its power.
But even the distinctive voice has changed, huskier than the higher pitch of the early years that added to his ambiguity and the confusion over the gender of the pretty Culture Club singer with long dreads, make up and flowing clothes.