hustle


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Related to hustle: hustle and bustle

hus·tle

 (hŭs′əl)
v. hus·tled, hus·tling, hus·tles
v.intr.
1. To move or act energetically and rapidly: We hustled to get dinner ready on time.
2. To push or force one's way.
3. To act aggressively, especially in business dealings.
4. Slang
a. To obtain something by deceitful or illicit means; practice theft or swindling.
b. To solicit customers. Used of a pimp or prostitute.
c. To misrepresent one's ability in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling.
v.tr.
1. To push or convey in a hurried or rough manner: hustled the prisoner into a van.
2. To cause or urge to proceed quickly; hurry: hustled the board into a quick decision.
3. Slang
a. To sell or get by questionable or aggressive means: hustled stolen watches; hustling spare change.
b. To pressure into buying or doing something: a barfly hustling the other customers for drinks.
c. To misrepresent one's skill in (a game or activity) in order to deceive someone, especially in gambling: hustle pool.
n.
1. The act or an instance of jostling or shoving.
2. Energetic activity; drive.
3. Slang An illicit or unethical way of doing business or obtaining money; a fraud or deceit: "the most dangerous and wide-open drug hustle of them all" (Newsweek).

[Dutch husselen, to shake, from Middle Dutch hustelen, frequentative of hutsen.]

hus′tler n.

hustle

(ˈhʌsəl)
vb
1. to shove or crowd (someone) roughly
2. to move or cause to move hurriedly or furtively: he hustled her out of sight.
3. (tr) to deal with or cause to proceed hurriedly: to hustle legislation through.
4. slang to earn or obtain (something) forcefully
5. slang US and Canadian (of procurers and prostitutes) to solicit
n
6. an instance of hustling
7. undue activity
8. (Dancing) a disco dance of the 1970s
[C17: from Dutch husselen to shake, from Middle Dutch hutsen]
ˈhustler n

hus•tle

(ˈhʌs əl)

v. -tled, -tling,
n. v.i.
1. to proceed or work rapidly or energetically.
2. to push or force one's way; jostle or shove.
3. to be aggressive, esp. in business or other financial dealings.
4. Slang. to earn one's living by illicit or unethical means.
5. Slang. (of a prostitute) to solicit clients.
v.t.
6. to convey or cause to move, esp. to leave, roughly or hurriedly.
7. to pressure or coerce (a person) to buy or do something, esp. something illicit or ultimately unprofitable.
8. to urge, prod, or speed up: Hustle your work along.
9. to obtain by aggressive and often illicit means: to hustle money from unsuspecting tourists.
10. to sell, promote, or publicize aggressively or vigorously.
11. to jostle, push, or shove roughly.
n.
12. energetic activity, as in work.
13. discourteous shoving, pushing, or jostling.
14. Slang.
a. an inducing by pressure or deception to buy something, participate in a dishonest scheme, or the like.
b. such a scheme, game, or trick.
[1675–85; < Dutch husselen, variant of hutselen to shake =hutsen to shake + -el- -le]
hus′tler, n.

hustle


Past participle: hustled
Gerund: hustling

Imperative
hustle
hustle
Present
I hustle
you hustle
he/she/it hustles
we hustle
you hustle
they hustle
Preterite
I hustled
you hustled
he/she/it hustled
we hustled
you hustled
they hustled
Present Continuous
I am hustling
you are hustling
he/she/it is hustling
we are hustling
you are hustling
they are hustling
Present Perfect
I have hustled
you have hustled
he/she/it has hustled
we have hustled
you have hustled
they have hustled
Past Continuous
I was hustling
you were hustling
he/she/it was hustling
we were hustling
you were hustling
they were hustling
Past Perfect
I had hustled
you had hustled
he/she/it had hustled
we had hustled
you had hustled
they had hustled
Future
I will hustle
you will hustle
he/she/it will hustle
we will hustle
you will hustle
they will hustle
Future Perfect
I will have hustled
you will have hustled
he/she/it will have hustled
we will have hustled
you will have hustled
they will have hustled
Future Continuous
I will be hustling
you will be hustling
he/she/it will be hustling
we will be hustling
you will be hustling
they will be hustling
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been hustling
you have been hustling
he/she/it has been hustling
we have been hustling
you have been hustling
they have been hustling
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been hustling
you will have been hustling
he/she/it will have been hustling
we will have been hustling
you will have been hustling
they will have been hustling
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been hustling
you had been hustling
he/she/it had been hustling
we had been hustling
you had been hustling
they had been hustling
Conditional
I would hustle
you would hustle
he/she/it would hustle
we would hustle
you would hustle
they would hustle
Past Conditional
I would have hustled
you would have hustled
he/she/it would have hustled
we would have hustled
you would have hustled
they would have hustled
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hustle - a swindle in which you cheat at gambling or persuade a person to buy worthless property
sting operation - a complicated confidence game planned and executed with great care (especially an operation implemented by undercover agents to apprehend criminals)
swindle, cheat, rig - the act of swindling by some fraudulent scheme; "that book is a fraud"
2.hustle - a rapid active commotionhustle - a rapid active commotion    
ruckus, ruction, rumpus, commotion, din, tumult - the act of making a noisy disturbance
Verb1.hustle - cause to move furtively and hurriedly; "The secret service agents hustled the speaker out of the amphitheater"
move, displace - cause to move or shift into a new position or place, both in a concrete and in an abstract sense; "Move those boxes into the corner, please"; "I'm moving my money to another bank"; "The director moved more responsibilities onto his new assistant"
2.hustle - move or cause to move energetically or busily; "The cheerleaders bustled about excitingly before their performance"
move - move so as to change position, perform a nontranslational motion; "He moved his hand slightly to the right"
3.hustle - sell something to or obtain something from by energetic and especially underhanded activity
steal - take without the owner's consent; "Someone stole my wallet on the train"; "This author stole entire paragraphs from my dissertation"
4.hustle - get by trying hard; "she hustled a free lunch from the waiter"
receive, have - get something; come into possession of; "receive payment"; "receive a gift"; "receive letters from the front"
5.hustle - pressure or urge someone into an action
persuade - cause somebody to adopt a certain position, belief, or course of action; twist somebody's arm; "You can't persuade me to buy this ugly vase!"

hustle

verb
1. jostle, force, push, crowd, rush, hurry, thrust, elbow, shove, jog, bustle, impel The guards hustled Harry out of the car.
2. hurry, hasten, get a move on (informal) You'll have to hustle if you're to get home for supper.
noun
1. commotion, bustle, activity, excitement, hubbub, hurly-burly, liveliness the perfect retreat from the hustle and bustle of London

hustle

verb
1. To increase the speed of:
noun
1. An aggressive readiness along with energy to undertake taxing efforts:
Translations
إخْتِلاس، يَعْتاش بوسائِل غير قانونيَّهتَزاحُم، تَدافُع، نَشاطتَعْمَل كزانيَه، تَسْتَجْدي الزَّبائِنيَدْفَع ، يُسَرِّعيَدْفَع بِخُشونَه
horečná činnostkšeftovatnutitobratoškubat
fuppeliv og rørepressepuffeskubbe
árulja magátfeketén dolgozikkituszkolutca: az utcán "dolgozik"üzletel
asihrekja; hrindaòröngva
apsukrus verslininkaspardavinėtiprostitutėšurmulysverstis neteisėta prekyba
apkraptgrūstītgrūstītiesizgrūstiziet uz panela , maukot
horúčkovitá činnosťrobiť čierne obchodyšľapať
aceleacele et mekhileli yollardan kazanç sağlamakkandırmakorospuluk etmek/yapmak

hustle

[ˈhʌsl]
A. N
1. (= activity) → bullicio m
hustle and bustleajetreo m, vaivén m
2. (US) (= trick) → timo m, chanchullo m
B. VT
1. (= jostle) → empujar, codear; (= hurry up) [+ person] → dar prisa a
they hustled him in/outle hicieron entrar/salir a empujones or sin ceremonia
he was hustled into a carlo metieron en un coche a empujones or sin ceremonia
2. (fig) to hustle things alongllevar las cosas a buen paso
to hustle sb into making a decisionmeter prisa a algn para que tome una decisión
I won't be hustled into anythingno voy a dejar que me empujen a nada
3. (US) they were paid to hustle drinks out of the customersles pagaban para sacarles bebidas a los clientes
they were hustling him for payment of the debtle apretaban las clavijas para que saldara la deuda
C. VI
1. (= hurry) → darse prisa, apresurarse, apurarse (LAm)
2. (= work hard) → trabajar duro, currar (Sp)
3. [prostitute] → hacer la calle

hustle

[ˈhʌsəl]
nbousculade f
hustle and bustle → tourbillon m d'activité

hustle

n (= jostling)Gedränge nt; (= hurry)Hetze f, → Eile f; the hustle (and bustle) of the city centredas geschäftige Treiben or das Gewühl (inf)in der Innenstadt
vt
(= hurry) to hustle somebody into a room/out of a buildingjdn schnell in einen Raum/aus einem Gebäude bringen or befördern (inf); she hustled her way through the crowdsie drängelte sich durch die Menge
(fig inf)drängen; I won’t be hustled into a decisionich lasse mich nicht zu einer Entscheidung drängen; I won’t be hustled into selling my sharesich lasse mich nicht dazu drängen, meine Aktien zu verkaufen; to hustle things (on or along)die Dinge vorantreiben or beschleunigen
vi
hasten, eilen; (through crowd etc) → sich (durch)drängeln
(= solicit)auf den Strich gehen (inf); to hustle for business (entrepreneur etc) → Aufträgen nachjagen
(US inf: = work quickly) → sich ins Zeug legen (inf)

hustle

[ˈhʌsl]
1. n hustle and bustletrambusto, via vai m inv
2. vt (push, person) → spingere, incalzare
to hustle in/out → spintonare dentro/fuori
we'll have to hustle things along → dobbiamo fare più in fretta
3. vi to hustle in/outentrare/uscire in fretta

hustle

(ˈhasl) verb
1. to push quickly and roughly. The man was hustled out of the office.
2. to make (someone) act quickly. Don't try to hustle me into making a sudden decision.
3. (American) to swindle; to obtain something dishonestly or illegally. to hustle money from old ladies; the car dealer tried to hustle us.
4. (American) to sell or earn one's living by illegal means. hustling on the streets; hustle drugs.
5. (American) (slang) to work as a prostitute; to solicit clients.
noun
quick and busy activity.
hustler noun
(American) (slang).
1. someone who tries to obtain money dishonestly; a swindler.
2. a prostitute.
3. (informal) someone (especially in business) who is determined to succeed.
References in classic literature ?
It seemed monstrous to him that policemen and judges should esteem his word as nothing in comparison with the bartender's--poor Jurgis could not know that the owner of the saloon paid five dollars each week to the policeman alone for Sunday privileges and general favors-- nor that the pugilist bartender was one of the most trusted henchmen of the Democratic leader of the district, and had helped only a few months before to hustle out a record-breaking vote as a testimonial to the magistrate, who had been made the target of odious kid-gloved reformers.
When, after weeks and weeks of cautious driving of scattered elephants across the hills, the forty or fifty wild monsters were driven into the last stockade, and the big drop gate, made of tree trunks lashed together, jarred down behind them, Kala Nag, at the word of command, would go into that flaring, trumpeting pandemonium (generally at night, when the flicker of the torches made it difficult to judge distances), and, picking out the biggest and wildest tusker of the mob, would hammer him and hustle him into quiet while the men on the backs of the other elephants roped and tied the smaller ones.
Bad flute-players twist and twirl, if they have to represent 'the quoit-throw,' or hustle the coryphaeus when they perform the 'Scylla.
They took the whipping-chains and rattled them in their trunks as they sidled up to Moti Guj, meaning to hustle him between them.
Darkness was deepening under the mountain walls, and it was not easy to discern much of the progress of the struggle, save that tall men were pushing their horses' muzzles through a clinging crowd of brigands, who seemed more inclined to harass and hustle the invaders than to kill them.
When she ceased the auricular impressions from their previous endearments seemed to hustle away into the corner of their brains, repeating themselves as echoes from a time of supremely purblind foolishness.
We hurry and push and hustle, for the good of humanity
Surely we are agreed that the more sober and restrained pleasures of the present are deeper as well as wiser than the noisy, foolish hustle which passed so often for enjoyment in the days of old--days so recent and yet already so inconceivable.
What d'ye say, son, to-morrow night you an' me hustle around an' see how much coin we can gather?
Josie Pye says she is just going to college for education's sake, because she won't have to earn her own living; she says of course it is different with orphans who are living on charity--THEY have to hustle.
The first thing she did was to make him hustle round and put up a tombstone to the first Mrs.
Mr Pluck was about to return some evasive reply, when the hustle caused by a party entering the next box seemed to attract the attention of all four gentlemen, who exchanged glances of much meaning.