hybridism


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hy·brid

 (hī′brĭd)
n.
1. Genetics The offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock, especially the offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties, species, or races.
2.
a. Something of mixed origin or composition, such as a word whose elements are derived from different languages.
b. Something having two kinds of components that produce the same or similar results, such as a vehicle powered by both an electric motor and an internal combustion engine as sources of power for the drivetrain.

[Latin hibrida, hybrida, mongrel.]

hy′brid·ism n.
hy′brid·ist n.
hy·brid′i·ty (hī-brĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

hybridism

1. a word formed from elements drawn from different languages.
2. the practice of coining such words. — hybrid, n., adj.
See also: Linguistics
1. a word formed from elements drawn from different languages.
2. the practice of coining such words.
See also: Language
the blending of diverse cultures or traditions.
See also: Anthropology
Translations

hybridism

[ˈhaɪbrɪdɪzəm] Nhibridismo m

hybridism

n (lit, fig)Hybridismus m
References in classic literature ?
He represents in little India in transition - the monstrous hybridism of East and West,' the Russian replied.
In the four succeeding chapters, the most apparent and gravest difficulties on the theory will be given: namely, first, the difficulties of transitions, or in understanding how a simple being or a simple organ can be changed and perfected into a highly developed being or elaborately constructed organ; secondly the subject of Instinct, or the mental powers of animals, thirdly, Hybridism, or the infertility of species and the fertility of varieties when intercrossed; and fourthly, the imperfection of the Geological Record.
It is a good bet that this blend of WASP/Latino/ Catholic hybridism would make Jeb Bush a formidable general-election candidate.
In addition to the idea of syncretism and hybridism, Ashcroft et al.
These images construct a discourse on modernity that reflects on the profound hybridism of Latin American culture, from the Caribbean to Tierra del Fuego, that points as much to the region's natural wealth as to its material and spiritual history.
EDUARDO ZACHLA, "Subsistent Parts: Aquinas on the Hybridism of Human Souls.
Lund's artwork incorporates abstractions of space and time and reference of hybridism, urbanism, juxtaposed to concept of natural order.
Unlike subject-oriented '-ly', subject-related '-ly' is a strong case for word-class overlap or word-class hybridism or indeterminacy.
Now, there is a situation of hybridism, the plan and the object intertwined.
Finley examines how that conflict first began to rise, making culture matter, how popular song became involved, how the dynamics of Islamic renewal and fervor became a factor, how gender offered a selected taboo, and how hybridism affected the Arab youth.
Methods like changing loyalties, and thus changing the borders between the two empires, were endemic and reflected the very same hybridism that is embedded in the frontier gray-zone.