hybridity


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hy·brid

 (hī′brĭd)
n.
1. Genetics The offspring of genetically dissimilar parents or stock, especially the offspring produced by breeding plants or animals of different varieties, species, or races.
2.
a. Something of mixed origin or composition, such as a word whose elements are derived from different languages.
b. Something having two kinds of components that produce the same or similar results, such as a vehicle powered by both an electric motor and an internal combustion engine as sources of power for the drivetrain.

[Latin hibrida, hybrida, mongrel.]

hy′brid·ism n.
hy′brid·ist n.
hy·brid′i·ty (hī-brĭd′ĭ-tē) n.

hybridism, hybridity

the blending of diverse cultures or traditions.
See also: Anthropology
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References in periodicals archive ?
As he and other Metis scholars have explained, the constant obsession with Metis hybridity waters down Metis aboriginality, making them appear "not as indigenous" as other Aboriginal groups, or not even a people.
The Rise of Black Artists, the second of two books on the twentieth century and the final volume in The Image of the Black in Western Art, takes on important topics ranging from urban migration within the United States to globalization, to Negritude and cultural hybridity, to the modern Black artist's relationship with European aesthetic traditions and experimentation with new technologies and media.
In this sense, the authors analyze the hybridity of topics and characters as well as the use of cliches or typical scenarios, as ways both to interrogate the genres and to address broader contemporary societal issues: for instance, immigration and the horror of the border in Planet Terror (2007), Vampires (1998) and From Dusk Till Dawn (1996); race and colonialism in Bubba Ho-Tep (2002) and Ravenous (1999); nationalism and consumerism in Land of the Dead (2005) and The Walking Dead; and sexualities and queerness in Vampires and Curse of the Undead (1959).
Hybridity is the new term for multidimensional, modular, and multiactor peace operations.
Drawing selectively on postcolonial theory, we suggest that a historical hybridity perspective serves as a crucial heuristic device to understand the nature of Indian management and its globalization related transition.
These selections all work to dispel any easy ideas about Tijuana as the sign of postmodern hybridity, seeing it rather as Janus-faced, prismatic, often fictional.
The post-colonial concept of hybridity is a useful tool for gay Asian men to decolonize gay theologies with respect to Asian American issues on the one hand and to decolonize Asian American theologies with respect to gay issues on the other hand.
They serve as the basis for her experimentation with hybridity: Only a hybrid visual language, she believes, has the power to mediate the natural hybridity of the world's entities and creatures.
Christians must acknowledge the interconnectedness of human life, for an awareness of hybridity can promote empathy, what Saracino describes as an affective openness to others.
Hybridity is typically used by this author to denote a process of Christian domination of Judaism: "I see hybridity as an instrument that can be deployed as an object of either resistance or control depending on context" (192n164).
The combination of democracy with the multicultural space, whether real or fictional, should not hide the deep hegemonic structures of this hybridity and the historical conditions that created it, namely, the Zionist occupation of Palestine.
So it was refreshing to sneak past the bouncers posted in front of AUB's Assembly Hall Wednesday evening and find another, completely unexpected species of hybridity.