hydrogen


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to hydrogen: Hydrogen fuel cell

hy·dro·gen

 (hī′drə-jən)
n. Symbol H
A colorless, highly flammable element, that occurs as a diatomic molecule, H2, the lightest of all gases and the most abundant element in the universe, used in the production of synthetic ammonia and methanol, in petroleum refining, in the hydrogenation of organic materials, as a reducing atmosphere, in oxyhydrogen torches, in cryogenic research, and in rocket fuels. Atomic number 1; atomic weight 1.00794; melting point -259.1°C; boiling point -252.8°C; density at 0°C 0.08988 gram per liter; valence 1. See Periodic Table.

[French hydrogène : Greek hudro-, hydro- + French -gène, -gen.]

hy·drog′e·nous (-drōj′ə-nəs) adj.

hydrogen

(ˈhaɪdrɪdʒən)
n
(Elements & Compounds)
a. a flammable colourless gas that is the lightest and most abundant element in the universe. It occurs mainly in water and in most organic compounds and is used in the production of ammonia and other chemicals, in the hydrogenation of fats and oils, and in welding. Symbol: H; atomic no: 1; atomic wt: 1.00794; valency: 1; density: 0.08988 kg/m3; melting pt: –259.34°C; boiling pt: –252.87°C. See also deuterium, tritium
b. (as modifier): hydrogen bomb.
[C18: from French hydrogène, from hydro- + -gen; so called because its combustion produces water]

hy•dro•gen

(ˈhaɪ drə dʒən)

n.
a colorless, odorless, flammable gas, the lightest of the elements, that combines chemically with oxygen to form water. Symbol: H; at. wt.: 1.00797; at. no.: 1; density: 0.0899 g/l at 0°C and 760 mm pressure.
[< French hydrogène (1787); see hydro-1, -gen]

hy·dro·gen

(hī′drə-jən)
Symbol H A colorless, odorless, highly flammable gaseous element that is the lightest and most abundant element in the universe. It occurs in water in combination with oxygen, in most organic compounds, and in small amounts in the atmosphere as a gaseous mixture of its three isotopes (protium, deuterium, and tritium). In the sun and other stars, the conversion of hydrogen into helium by nuclear fusion produces heat and light. Hydrogen is used to make rocket fuel, synthetic ammonia, and methanol, to hydrogenate fats and oils, and to refine petroleum. Atomic number 1. See Periodic Table. See Note at oxygen.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrogen - a nonmetallic univalent element that is normally a colorless and odorless highly flammable diatomic gashydrogen - a nonmetallic univalent element that is normally a colorless and odorless highly flammable diatomic gas; the simplest and lightest and most abundant element in the universe
tritium - a radioactive isotope of hydrogen; atoms of tritium have three times the mass of ordinary hydrogen atoms
chemical element, element - any of the more than 100 known substances (of which 92 occur naturally) that cannot be separated into simpler substances and that singly or in combination constitute all matter
H2O, water - binary compound that occurs at room temperature as a clear colorless odorless tasteless liquid; freezes into ice below 0 degrees centigrade and boils above 100 degrees centigrade; widely used as a solvent
gas - a fluid in the gaseous state having neither independent shape nor volume and being able to expand indefinitely
Translations
водород
hidrogen
vodík
brinthydrogen
hidrogeno
vesinik
هیدروژن
vety
हाइड्रोजन
hidrogenvodik
hidrogén
hydrogeno
hidrogen
vetni
水素
수소
hydrogenium
vandenilis
ūdeņradisvandenilis
ഹൈഡ്രജന്‍
hidrogen
vodík
vodik
väte
hidrojeni
ก๊าซไฮโดรเจน
водень
آبگر
hiđrôhi-đrôhyđrôhy-đrôkhí hydro

hydrogen

[ˈhaɪdrɪdʒən]
A. Nhidrógeno m
B. CPD hydrogen bomb Nbomba f de hidrógeno
hydrogen chloride Ncloruro m de hidrógeno
hydrogen peroxide Nagua f oxigenada
hydrogen sulphide Nácido m sulfhídrico

hydrogen

[ˈhaɪdrədʒən] nhydrogène mhydrogen bomb nbombe f à hydrogènehydrogen peroxide neau f oxygénée

hydrogen

nWasserstoff m, → Hydrogenium nt (spec)

hydrogen

:
hydrogen bomb
hydrogen bond
nWasserstoffbrücke(nbindung) f
hydrogen sulphide
n (= gas)Schwefelwasserstoff m

hydrogen

[ˈhaɪdrɪdʒn] nidrogeno

hydrogen

(ˈhaidrədʒən) noun
an element, the lightest gas, which burns and which, when combined with oxygen, produces water.
hydrogen bomb (ˈeitʃbom) (also H-bomb )
a very powerful bomb in which the explosion is caused by turning hydrogen into helium at a very high temperature.

hydrogen

هَيْدْرُوجِيـنٌ vodík brint Wasserstoff υδρογόνο hidrógeno vety hydrogène hidrogen idrogeno 水素 수소 waterstof hydrogen wodór hidrogénio, hidrogênio водород väte ก๊าซไฮโดรเจน hidrojen khí hydro

hy·dro·gen

n. hidrógeno;
___ concentrationconcentración de ___.
References in classic literature ?
The immense building and the stage itself were still lit by gas; hydrogen was used to regulate and modify the lighting of a scene; and this was done by means of a special apparatus which, because of the multiplicity of its pipes, was known as the "organ.
And even if I wish to rise more quickly to the surface, I ship the screw, and the pressure of the water causes the Nautilus to rise vertically like a balloon filled with hydrogen.
It had occurred towards midnight of the twelfth; and the spectroscope, to which he had at once resorted, indicated a mass of flaming gas, chiefly hydrogen, moving with an enormous velocity towards this earth.
Others have endeavored to account for these discharges of "mountain artillery" on humbler principles; attributing them to the loud reports made by the disruption and fall of great masses of rock, reverberated and prolonged by the echoes; others, to the disengagement of hydrogen, produced by subterraneous beds of coal in a state of ignition.
It contained about three hundred and twenty cubic feet of gas, which, if pure hydrogen, would support twenty-one pounds upon its first inflation, before the gas has time to deteriorate or escape.
I should say beyond doubt that it contained a considerable proportion of free hydrogen.
Out of the court, and a long way out of it, there is considerable excitement too, for men of science and philosophy come to look, and carriages set down doctors at the corner who arrive with the same intent, and there is more learned talk about inflammable gases and phosphuretted hydrogen than the court has ever imagined.
At the outset, in order not to give the balloon too ponderous dimensions, he had decided to fill it with hydrogen gas, which is fourteen and a half times lighter than common air.
These were all absolutely gas tight and filled with hydrogen, and the entire aerostat was kept at any level by means of a long internal balloonette of oiled and toughened silk canvas, into which air could be forced and from which it could be pumped.
But, to bring this rapid sketch to a close, I will only add that a certain Hans Pfaal, of Rotterdam, launching himself in a balloon filled with a gas extracted from nitrogen, thirty-seven times lighter than hydrogen, reached the moon after a passage of nineteen hours.
So saying, the thoughtless fellow lit a match by striking it on the sole of his boot; and approached the burner fixed to the receptacle, in which the carbonized hydrogen, stored at high pressure, sufficed for the lighting and warming of the projectile for a hundred and forty-four hours, or six days and six nights.
I do not know if all matter will be found to be made of one element, as oxygen or hydrogen, at last, but the world of manners and actions is wrought of one stuff, and begin where we will we are pretty sure in a short space to be mumbling our ten commandments.