hydrologic cycle


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hydrologic cycle

hydrologic cycle

n
(Physical Geography) another name for water cycle

hy′drolog′ic cy′cle


n.
the natural sequence through which water passes into the atmosphere as water vapor, precipitates to earth, and returns to the atmosphere through evaporation.
[1955–60]

hy·dro·log·ic cycle

(hī′drə-lŏj′ĭk)
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References in periodicals archive ?
As the city of Portland is developed, impervious surfaces create increased amounts of stormwater runoff during rainfall events, disrupting the natural hydrologic cycle.
Impacts of changes in temperature and in precipitation, changes affecting the hydrologic cycle, are among the most worrying for the water resources manager.
The current abounding in water hydrologic cycle allows to sell some amount of electricity for the Central Asian region at the beginning of 2011.
Global warming and extreme climate events are changing the dynamics of hydrologic cycle, rainfall patterns and its distribution with impending consequences on human populations, enhancing vulnerabilities of communities living in mountainous and drought prone dryland areas.
People have become educated about the whole hydrologic cycle in the basin," Scott agrees.
Climate change is not about global warming but about changes in the hydrologic cycle.
The driving forces behind atmospheric and ocean circulation and the hydrologic cycle are then covered.
The combination of water level manipulation and channelization has drastically altered the historic hydrologic cycle, creating chaotic flood conditions that shorten or eliminate the summer growing season for floodplain plants.
Then he adds each year, "I just think it's amazing that a poet could capture the hydrologic cycle so well.
It is the lumped conceptual model capable of simulating various components of catchment hydrology, which consist of three storage components of the hydrologic cycle.
Through the workings of an internal hydrologic cycle, trapped water vapor condenses in diaphanous veils on the interior surfaces of the sheeting before dripping downward and the haziness of this moisture further separates the viewer from the mysterious worlds within.
Parikh said that climate change has completely changed the hydrologic cycle.