hydrolysis

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Related to hydrolytic cleavage: Hydrolytic enzyme, Hydrolysis reaction

hy·drol·y·sis

 (hī-drŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
n.
The reaction of water with another chemical compound to form two or more products, involving ionization of the water molecule and usually splitting the other compound. Examples include the catalytic conversion of starch to glucose, saponification, and the formation of acids or bases from dissolved ions.

hy′dro·lyte′ (-līt′) n.
hy′dro·lyt′ic (-drə-lĭt′ĭk) adj.

hydrolysis

(haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs)
n
(Chemistry) a chemical reaction in which a compound reacts with water to produce other compounds

hy•drol•y•sis

(haɪˈdrɒl ə sɪs)

n., pl. -ses (-ˌsiz)
chemical decomposition in which a compound is split into other compounds by reacting with water.
[1875–80]

hy·drol·y·sis

(hī-drŏl′ĭ-sĭs)
The splitting of a chemical compound into two or more new compounds by reacting with water. Hydrolysis plays a role in the breakdown of food in the body, as in the conversion of starch to glucose.

hydrolysis

The process by which a chemical compound decomposes through reaction with water.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hydrolysis - a chemical reaction in which water reacts with a compound to produce other compounds; involves the splitting of a bond and the addition of the hydrogen cation and the hydroxide anion from the water
chemical reaction, reaction - (chemistry) a process in which one or more substances are changed into others; "there was a chemical reaction of the lime with the ground water"
Translations

hydrolysis

[haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs] Nhidrólisis f

hydrolysis

nHydrolyse f

hydrolysis

[haɪˈdrɒlɪsɪs] nidrolisi f

hy·drol·y·sis

n. hidrólisis, disolución química de un compuesto por acción del agua.
References in periodicals archive ?
In the simplest summary, this "extra" hydroxyl group relative to DNA makes RNA much less chemically stable than DNA by virtue of its being prone to hydrolytic cleavage events along the sugar-phosphate backbone.
In the body, chemical hydrolysis of nanoparticles begins with water uptake, followed by hydrolytic cleavage of the bonds, under the influence of different factors such as chemical structure, crystallinity and hydrophobicity, molecular weight, purity, morphology, processing method, etc.