hyperalgesia


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Related to hyperalgesia: Hyperpathia, Neuropathic pain

hyperalgesia

(ˌhaɪpərælˈdʒiːzɪə)
n
(Medicine) med an extreme sensitivity to pain

hyperalgesia

an unusually high sensitivity to pain. — hyperalgesic, adj.
See also: Pain
Translations
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cytokine-mediated inflammatory hyperalgesia limited by interleukin-1 receptor antagonist.
PAs have been marketed for diagnostic purposes in clinical practice since neuromuscular conditions are often associated with mechanical hyperalgesia.
7,244,709, titled "Compositions and Methods for Enhanced Mucosal Delivery of Parathyroid Hormone," and PYY Nasal Spray for treatment of obesity, United States Patent 7,244,412, titled "Methods for Manipulating Upper Gastrointestinal Transit, Blood Flow, and Satiety, and for Treating Visceral Hyperalgesia.
Three characteristics distinguished patients suffering chronic postoperative pain from those who reported no pain at 6 months: higher pain scores 24 hours after surgery; a greater likelihood of reporting wound hyperalgesia at 24 and 48 hours; and a previous history of a genitourinary infection.
Explanations are given for terms that are used throughout the rest of the videotape: allodynia, hyperalgesia, paresthesia, numbness, and summation.
Effects of C fiber dysfunction include spontaneous pain (which is often described as a burning sensation), allodynia (interpretation of nonpainful stimuli as painful), and hyperalgesia (interpretation of minimally painful stimuli as being excruciatingly painful).
Results: The intraperitoneal administration of OMT (160, 80 mg/kg) could prevent the development of mechanical allodynia, thermal hyperalgesia induced by CCI.
Symptoms may also include spontaneous deep aching pain and/or shooting pain, thermal hyperalgesia, and tactile allodynia.
They investigated the difference between persistent pain, such as toothache, and pain that results from the increased sensitivity of nerves in injured or diseased tissue (for example when we touch inflamed skin), known as hyperalgesia and discovered that these two types of pain are generated by the same nerves, but result from different underlying mechanisms.
Secondary hyperalgesia is thought to be a basis for chronic post surgical pain.
CRPS I patients with hyperalgesia and allodynia have significantly higher plasma levels of TNF-[alpha] than CRPS patients without hyperalgesia and allodynia (14,15).
One month later low back pain, aching and stiffness developed in the joints of both ankles and feet and was accompanied by dorsal hyperalgesia and allodynia of the left foot.