hyperbaton


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hy·per·ba·ton

 (hī-pûr′bə-tŏn′)
n.
A figure of speech that uses deviation from normal or logical word order for rhetorical effect, as in anastrophe or hysteron proteron.

[Greek huperbaton, from neuter of huperbatos, transposed, from huperbainein, to step over : huper-, over, across; see hyper- + bainein, to step; see gwā- in Indo-European roots.]

hyperbaton

(haɪˈpɜːbəˌtɒn)
n
(Rhetoric) rhetoric a figure of speech in which the normal order of words is reversed, as in cheese I love
[C16: via Latin from Greek, literally: an overstepping, from hyper- + bainein to step]

hyperbaton

a rhetorical device in which the usual or expected word order is inverted.
See also: Rhetoric and Rhetorical Devices

hyperbaton

The transposition of the usual order of words, as in came the Spring.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyperbaton - reversal of normal word order (as in `cheese I love')
rhetorical device - a use of language that creates a literary effect (but often without regard for literal significance)
References in periodicals archive ?
Mann moves next to the proem to The Faerie Queene, which carefully renegotiates a famous hyperbaton in the first lines of Vergil's Aeneid, and she proceeds to Book VI, in which the same trope mediates the breaches in decorum met by, and brought on by, Calidore as the knight of Courtesy.
2) The Fosters have spoken of how the use of hyperbaton in the sonnet presents its own fair number of exegetical problems.
Contrast the elevated language here--the invocation to not one but multiple gods, the superlative clarissima mundi (line 5), the anaphora of co-ordinating conjunctions to garner a sense of immense scale, the hyperbaton of the main clause verb, cano (line 12), right to the end of the sentence to leave the poet breathless--with the opening of the Ars poetica:
2) Gongora's detractors universally condemned the use of violent hyperbaton and wordy, metaphoric overlay, as such techniques created too much textual and interpretive difficulty, and thus too strongly contested poetry's traditional role in clearly communicating aesthetic, social, and moral objectives to readers and listeners.
Undoubtedly, the writing deploys challenging and complex figures of thought and devices of patterning (metalepsis, hyperbaton, and anacoluthon, among others), and we do not have far to look in order to confirm the standard estimation of him as a poet of torturous style, a poet of congeretic webs of description and limitless qualification.
This darkness troubles the poet, whose arguments reveal incongruence and potential chaos due to the irrational panic, as can be appreciated in the ongoing hyperbaton.
2] 19-29 Figures of Feeling 19 Asyndeton (omission of conjunction) 20-21 Anaphora (repetitions) and diatyposis (vivid descriptions) 22 Hyperbaton (inversions) 23 Polypota (accumulations, variations, climaxes) 24 Plural to Singular 25 Past to Present 26 Transposition of Persons 27 Change in Narrative Point of View * 28-29 Periphrasis (circumlocution) * Fourth Source: Choice of Words (30-38) 30 Introduction to Diction [missing text after 30.
Also, we should study his rhetorical devices, such as anadiplosis, diacope, hyperbaton and other persuasive-writing techniques I really don't have the I.
is strikingly discontinuous, not only frequently switching (speculative) narrators, narrated times, and times of narration, but, in an utterly implausible way given the ostensibly dialogic nature of most of the book, in consistent hyperbaton, parenthesis, and other very writerly forms of interruption.
For example, in chapter three we are told that the trope of hyperbaton is present in the Candelaio as a means to underscore the process of rectilinearity by "inverting and diverting order.
His prose efforts are unanimously criticized by ancient authors: he was too fond of hyperbaton, neologisms, poetic embellishment, and intentional ambiguity.
Unidirectionality is highlighted by Bruno's employment of the contrasting, non-rectilinear strategy of hyperbaton, which deviates from unidirectional thought by "inverting and diverting order" (86).