hyperbolic paraboloid


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hyperbolic paraboloid

n.
A surface of which all sections parallel to one coordinate plane are hyperbolas and all sections parallel to another coordinate plane are parabolas.

hyperbol′ic parab′oloid


n.
a paraboloid that can be put into a position such that its sections parallel to one coordinate plane are hyperbolas, with its sections parallel to the other two coordinate planes being parabolas.
[1835–45]
References in periodicals archive ?
And what a roof it is--a complex copper clad hyperbolic paraboloid structure that Mace's associate director Jonathan Emmines refers to affectionately as the 'Concrete Pringle' or 'Witch's Hat'.
For the Commonwealth Institute he adopted the then-fashionable form of a hyperbolic paraboloid, a complex, double-curving surface pioneered by the brilliant Spanish-born engineer-architect Felix Candela (1910-97) which had never before been attempted in Britain.
Optimization of concrete hyperbolic paraboloid umbrella shells, Available from: http://www.
A rare example in the history of music when a building was designed for the performance of a specific piece of music, "Poeme Electronique" was performed in a structure designed by Xenakis (who doubled as an architect) based on the complex mathematical surface of the hyperbolic paraboloid.
The library's saw-tooth roof is also a response to built context, amplified here with playful interlocking arrangements of high and low gables that produce hyperbolic paraboloid sections.
Its elaborate roof, known as a hyperbolic paraboloid, is one of the trademarks of architect Sam Scorer, who died last year at the age of 80.
An origami enthusiast, he's tamed the hyperbolic paraboloid.
Hmm, try as I might, I just don't see what's so magnificent about the mushroom-like hyperbolic paraboloid shells that offer only an ill lit, badly ventilated void of dirty concrete, hardly suitable to house an indoor market.
He plays this idea out in full-scale participatory projects such as the installation Above and Below: The Hypar Room, 1999, named for the main design principle at work, a hyperbolic paraboloid (or "hypar" for short) in which a horizontal warped plane is formed by straight vertical lines beneath it.
FUNNY, but whenever I visit the Market Hall, the last thing that occurs to me is to admire the hyperbolic paraboloid shells forming its roof.
The market is unique because it is roofed with 21 freestanding asymmetric hyperbolic paraboloid shells - a feature that has led to it being hailed an architectural wonder.
The roof is more complex, its hyperbolic paraboloid form derived from a Muybridge-like analysis of the movement of an oar.