hypercapnia


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hy·per·cap·ni·a

 (hī′pər-kăp′nē-ə)
n.
1. An abnormally high concentration of carbon dioxide in the blood, usually caused by acute respiratory failure from conditions such as asthma and obstructive pulmonary disease. It can lead to seizures and death if acute and untreated.
2. Carbon dioxide poisoning due to abnormally high concentrations of carbon dioxide in an organism's environment.

[hyper- + Greek kapnos, smoke + -ia.]

hypercapnia

(ˌhaɪpəˈkæpnɪə)
n
(Medicine) an excess of carbon dioxide in the blood. Also: hypercarbia
[from hyper- + Greek kapnos smoke]
ˌhyperˈcapnic adj

hy•per•cap•ni•a

(ˌhaɪ pərˈkæp ni ə)
n.
the presence of an excessive amount of carbon dioxide in the blood.
[1905–10; hyper- + Greek kapn(ós) smoke + -ia]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hypercapnia - the physical condition of having the presence of an abnormally high level of carbon dioxide in the circulating blood
physical condition, physiological condition, physiological state - the condition or state of the body or bodily functions
asphyxia - a condition in which insufficient or no oxygen and carbon dioxide are exchanged on a ventilatory basis; caused by choking or drowning or electric shock or poison gas
acapnia, hypocapnia - a state in which the level of carbon dioxide in the blood is lower than normal; can result from deep or rapid breathing
Translations

hy·per·cap·ni·a

n. hipercapnia, cantidad excesiva de dióxido de carbono en la sangre.
References in periodicals archive ?
17,18) Administration of DIDS (4,4-diisothiocyanostilbene 2,2-disulfonic acid, anion exchanger inhibitor), a potent and relatively specific inhibitor of anion exchanger or acetazolamide, a carbonic anhydrase inhibitor or induction the Na-free medium decrease pulmonary vascular tone during hypercapnia in the isolated pulmonary artery.
Mathematical models easily demonstrated the critical importance of minute ventilation in driving dynamic hyperinflation, and gave a potent rationale for pursuing a strategy of permissive hypercapnia in the ventilatory support of severe airflow obstruction--long before its use in ARDS.
Portner and colleagues have investigated the effects of hypercapnia and reduced extracellular pH on the marine invertebrate Sipunculus nudus and on Antarctic fishes (Langenbuch and Portner, 2003; Langenbuch et al.
2003) it is possible that the adaptation to hypercapnia could be the result of RBF training.
On the other hand, short-term exposure to hypercapnia elicits acidosis of body fluids that remains almost uncompensated in the deep-sea crab Chionoecetus tanneri, but is fully recovered by bicarbonate accumulation in the shallow-water crab Cancer magister (Pane & Barry 2007).
However, outcomes were significantly better with surgery than with watchful waiting on measures of obstructive apneahypopnea, oxygen desaturation index, hypercapnia, sleep arousal index, and percentage of sleep time in fight sleep.
This relaxation increases the upper airway resistance during inspiration, leads to paralaryngeal collapse and hypoventilation, which end up with hypoxia and hypercapnia (3, 4).
The authors note that there is little evidence that hypercapnia is harmful to critically ill patients; indeed, there is much evidence that hypercapnia can aid lung-repair mechanisms in certain circumstances (7).
In addition the hypercapnia (pCO2) that develops with periods of apnoea will result in acidosis, which in turn compromises myocardial contractility as hydrogen ions bind to calcium receptors on the actin-myosin mechanism within cardiac muscle fibres (Devlin 2011).
At the most recent presentation, the patient exhibited marked respiratory distress, and she was in an acute state of confusion secondary to hypercapnia and hypoxemia.
Patients with post-hyperventilation central apnoea are typically free of neuromuscular or pulmonary disorder and have a normal or exaggerated response to hypercapnia (14).
These include nocturnal hypoxemia, hypercapnia, a tremendous increase in sympathetic nerve activity, hypertensive surges, endothelial dysfunction, vascular oxidative stress, inflammation, hypercoagulability, and markedly elevated left ventricular wall stress.