hyperostosis


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Related to hyperostosis: hyperostosis frontalis interna, diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis

hy·per·os·to·sis

 (hī′pər-ŏ-stō′sĭs)
n. pl. hy·per·os·to·ses (-sēz)
Excessive or abnormal thickening or growth of bone tissue.


hy′per·os·tot′ic (-ŏ-stŏt′ĭk) adj.

hyperostosis

(ˌhaɪpərɒˈstəʊsɪs)
n, pl -ses (-siːz)
1. (Pathology) an abnormal enlargement of the outer layer of a bone
2. (Pathology) a bony growth arising from the root of a tooth or from the surface of a bone
hyperostotic adj

hy•per•os•to•sis

(ˌhaɪ pər ɒˈstoʊ sɪs)

n.
excessive growth of bony tissue.
[1825–35; hyper- + Greek ost(éon) bone + -osis]
hy`per•os•tot′ic (-ɒˈstɒt ɪk) adj.
Translations

hy·per·os·to·sis

n. hiperostosis, desarrollo excesivo del tejido óseo.
References in periodicals archive ?
Synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis (SAPHO) syndrome is a rare group of sterile, inflammatory osteoarticular disorders classically associated with skin manifestations.
While hyperestrogenism due to ovarian tumors may lead to medullary bone development and polyostotic hyperostosis, these signs were not seen in this case.
I have been diagnosed with Diffuse Idiopathic Skeletal Hyperostosis (DISH), a skeletal problem caused by build-up of excess bone in the spinal canal.
These changes can also be seen in fibrous dysplasia, hyperparathyroidism, giant-cell tumor, and infantile cortical hyperostosis.
1) Such ectopic bone formation occurring following injury has been known by various names such as heterotopic ossification, (2) hyperostosis, (3) para-articular ossification, (4) and myositis ossificans traumatica.
Diffuse idiopathic skeletal hyperostosis (DISH) (also called ankylosing hyperostosis, Forestier's disease, or spondylitis ossificans ligamentosa) is an age-related chronic condition whose principal manifestation is new bone formation without degenerative, traumatic, or postinfection changes (1).
Bony changes secondary to pseudotumor may be reflected as hyperostosis or bone destruction.
Fluorosis results in osteosclerosis followed later by osteoporosis, periosteal changes including pathognomonic tumor-like zones of periosteal hyperostosis, and osteophytes at tendon, fascial, and muscle insertions (12).
HS also has been reported as a comorbid condition in patients with several rare syndromes, including SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis) and PAPA (pyogenic arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne) syndromes.
9 per cent of the sample (3 individuals of 105 with parietal bones available for assessment) demonstrated lesions characteristic of porotic hyperostosis (porosity of the cranial bones), another condition linked with nutritional deficiency.
Examinations of Adult Human Cadavers for the Incidence of Hyperostosis Frontalis Interna.
Proteus syndrome is a rare, complex, and variable disorder characterized by the overgrowth of multiple tissues including the connective tissue nevi, the epidermal nevi, and the craniofacial hyperostosis (1).
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