hypocoristic


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Related to hypocoristic: hypocorism

hy·poc·o·rism

 (hī-pŏk′ə-rĭz′əm, hī′pə-kôr′ĭz′əm)
n.
1. A name of endearment; a pet name.
2. The use of such names.

[Late Latin hypocorisma, from Greek hupokorisma, from hupokorizesthai, to call by endearing names : hupo-, beneath, secretly; see hypo- + korizesthai, to caress (from koros, boy or korē, girl; see ker- in Indo-European roots).]

hy′po·co·ris′tic (hī′pə-kə-rĭs′tĭk) adj. & n.
hy′po·co·ris′ti·cal·ly adv.

hy•po•co•ris•tic

(ˌhaɪ pə kəˈrɪs tɪk)

adj.
1. endearing, as a pet name or diminutive.
n.
2. a hypocoristic term; pet name or diminutive.
[1600–10; < Greek hypokoristikós, derivative of hypokorízesthai to call by endearing names =hypo- hypo- + kór(ē) girl, or kór(os) boy + -izesthai -ize; see -istic]
hy`po•co•ris′ti•cal•ly, adv.
References in periodicals archive ?
From morphophonology to sociolinguistics: The case of Akan hypocoristic day names.
Evidence has been gathered from data of language acquisition, children's early written production, abbreviation procedures, hypocoristic formation and other modalities of truncation.
As regards-ie (and its variant-y), prototypically, it creates diminutive nouns or adjectives and hypocoristic names: Bessy (< Elizabeth) or Annie (< Anne).
This German suffix (like the roughly homophonous English suffix spelled <-ie> or <-y>) is classified by some scholars as a diminutive suffix, and by others as a hypocoristic suffix.
A personal name ksk is unattested in Sogdian but could be understood as a hypocoristic in -akk from a compound containing Old Iranian *kasu- 'little'; cf.
It is pointless to blame conformist African professors for rehashing hypocoristic anthropological notions about African as an irrational society with no history and no philosophy, needing to borrow Western rationality if it si to advance into the future.
Interestingly, this is in sharp contrast with the fact that, to this day, the most important figure in the last Jacobite rebellion, in 1745, is popularly known as "Bonnie Prince Charlie", a label in which the hypocoristic form of the name rhymes internally with the familiar Scots qualifier bonnie, and well-known Jacobite tunes have titles like 'Charlie's my darling' and 'Wha'll be king but Charlie?
It is pointless to blame conformist African professors for rehashing hypocoristic anthropological notions about Africa as an irrational society with no history and no philosophy, needing to borrow Western rationality if it is to advance into the future.
Celtic saints were often known by hypocoristic forms with 'my' or 'your', including Kentigern 'hound-like lord' himself.
126 provide evidence for the finding that monkey is a vernacular diminutive formation made up of the root monk and the hypocoristic suffix EModE -ie ~ -(e)y, for which see Koziol (1972: [section] 489), Marchand (1969: 298-299), and OED3 s.
They argue that the diminutive may have arisen in adult systems out of a reanalysis of language addressed to babies as language about small things: "the relatively more frequent use of reduplication in early child language and motherese may have been reinterpreted as implying a hypocoristic pragmatic use, and this implicature may have been reinterpreted as primary hypocoristic meaning" (p.
Some atypically 'neutral' uses of insect names are the English (little) mite, and the French moucheron, 'gnat', to designate a baby or very young child, which are presumably hypocoristic in nature, or exaggerate the minute size of the children.