hyponymy


Also found in: Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to hyponymy: meronymy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.hyponymy - the semantic relation of being subordinate or belonging to a lower rank or class
semantic relation - a relation between meanings
Translations
Hyponymie

hyponymy

[haɪˈpɒnɪmɪ] Nhiponimia f
References in periodicals archive ?
cn}, and it is the set that belongs to all categories in the classification system, ci is the i category; R = R = {<ci, cj> [member of] r|1 < i < j < n}, which means hyponymy among the classifications in C and|<ci, cj> [member of] r means ci is the classification of cj.
Of paradigmatic relations, the words under discussion mostly display antonymy and hyponymy.
Word meaning has four aspects: denotation, or reference to something in the "real world" (15); connotation, or "often emotive" positive and negative associations (16); sense or semantic relations, such as synonymy, antonymy, hyponymy, and meronymy (17); and collocation, or the "likelihood that two words will co-occur" (18).
Hyponymy and Collaterality in Brunei Malay Kinship Terminology.
Haastrup and Henriksen (2000) argued that lexical competence has three dimensions: (a) partial-precise, which they define as referring to diverse levels of comprehension of the same lexical item; (b) receptive-productive, which as the name suggests, relates to whether one's knowledge of a given word is receptive or productive; and (c) depth of knowledge, which is a word's paradigmatic (antonymy, synonymy, hyponymy, etc.
Axioms automatically generated by the relationships of EWN: for example, synonymy, hyperonymy, hyponymy, etc.
Coverage includes an overview of the essential structure of language and the relationship between language and culture; French and English word structure as they affect translation issues; lexical structure in French, particularly hyponymy and synonymy; translation problems caused by syntactic differences between French and English; translation types and procedures; and a range of miscellaneous issues, such as translating humor, metaphor, punctuation.
I am particularly concerned with the relationships of synonymy, antonymy, and hyponymy between the source and target domain uses of each group, because, as I will show, these indicate the degree of coherence with which source-domain relationships are metaphorically mapped onto the target domain.