icicle

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i·ci·cle

 (ī′sĭ-kəl)
n.
1. A tapering spike of ice formed by the freezing of dripping or falling water.
2. Informal An aloof or emotionally unresponsive person.

[Middle English isikel : is, ice; see ice + ikel, icicle (from Old English gicel; see yeg- in Indo-European roots).]

icicle

(ˈaɪsɪkəl)
n
a hanging spike of ice formed by the freezing of dripping water
[C14: from ice + ickel, from Old English gicel icicle, related to Old Norse jökull large piece of ice, glacier]
ˈicicled adj

i•ci•cle

(ˈaɪ sɪ kəl)

n.
1. a pendent, tapering mass of ice formed by the freezing of dripping water.
2. something resembling this, as a thin strip of silver foil used as a Christmas tree decoration.
3. a cold, unemotional person.
[before 1000; Middle English isikel, Old English īsgicel]
i′ci•cled, adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.icicle - ice resembling a pendent spear, formed by the freezing of dripping watericicle - ice resembling a pendent spear, formed by the freezing of dripping water
ice, water ice - water frozen in the solid state; "Americans like ice in their drinks"
Translations
تَجَمُّد الماء أثْناء تَقَطُّرِهِ
rampouch
istap
jääpurikas
jégcsap
grýlukertigrÿlukerti
varveklis
lāsteka
ţurţur
cencúľ
ledena sveča
buz sacağı/sarkıtı

icicle

[ˈaɪsɪkl] Ncarámbano m

icicle

[ˈaɪsɪkəl] nglaçon m (naturel)

icicle

nEiszapfen m

icicle

[ˈaɪsɪkl] nghiacciolo

icicle

(ˈaisikl) noun
a long hanging piece of ice formed by the freezing of dripping water. icicles hanging from the roof.
References in classic literature ?
Enveloped in their shaggy watch coats, and with their heads muffled in woollen comforters, all bedarned and ragged, and their beards stiff with icicles, they seemed an eruption of bears from Labrador.
A row of huge icicles hung down from the edge of the roof, and anything more wintry than the whole ANBLICK could not well be imagined; but the sudden appearance of the great mountains in front was so startling that I felt no inclination to move toward bed again.
It was a fresh, crystal morning, with icicles hanging like dazzling pendants from the trees and a glaze of pale blue on the surface of the snow.
One winter's day, when the sun was shining brightly, the couple were standing outside their cottage, and the woman was looking at all the little icicles which hung from the roof.
The ground was hard as iron, the frost still rigorous; as he brushed among the hollies, icicles jingled and glittered in their fall; and wherever he went, a volley of eager sparrows followed him.
Pillars of hard, gray ice supported the high, arched roof, hung with crystal icicles.
And in the morning, one will arise as fresh as a lark and look at the window, and see the fields overlaid with hoarfrost, and fine icicles hanging from the naked branches, and the pond covered over with ice as thin as paper, and a white steam rising from the surface, and birds flying overhead with cheerful cries.
Spring decked the hallowed emblem with young blossoms and fresh green boughs; Summer brought roses of the deepest blush, and the perfected foliage of the forest; Autumn enriched it with that red and yellow gorgeousness which converts each wildwood leaf into a painted flower; and Winter silvered it with sleet, and hung it round with icicles, till it flashed in the cold sunshine, itself a frozen sunbeam.
The tall pines seemed sprinkled with a silver dust, and the willows, studded with minute icicles reflecting the prismatic rays, brought to mind the fairy trees conjured up by the caliph's story-teller to adorn his vale of diamonds.
That part of the expedition was easy enough, though the horses were painfully glistening with icicles, and the aspect of the tram- conductors' faces presented a repulsive blending of crimson and purple.
With this he conducted me to the verge of the cataract, and pointed along the side of the ravine to a number of curious looking roots, some three or four inches in thickness, and several feet long, which, after twisting among the fissures of the rock, shot perpendicularly from it and ran tapering to a point in the air, hanging over the gulf like so many dark icicles.
The houses clothed in a dress of the same description, but which, owing to its position, shone like bright steel; while the enormous icicles that were pendent from every roof caught the brilliant light, apparently throwing it from one to the other, as each glittered, on the side next the luminary, with a golden lustre that melted away, on its opposite, into the dusky shades of a background.