iconoclasm


Also found in: Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

i·con·o·clasm

 (ī-kŏn′ə-klăz′əm)
n.
The beliefs, practices, or doctrine of an iconoclast.

[Back-formation from iconoclast.]

iconoclasm

(aɪˈkɒnəˌklæzəm)
n
the acts or beliefs of an iconoclast

i•con•o•clasm

(aɪˈkɒn əˌklæz əm)

n.
the action, beliefs, or spirit of iconoclasts.
[1790–1800]

iconoclasm

1. the practice of destroying images, especially those created for religious veneration.
2. the practice of opposing cherished beliefs or traditional institutions as being founded on error or superstition.
3. the doctrines underlying these practices. — iconoclast, n. — iconoclastic, adj.
See also: Images
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iconoclasm - the orientation of an iconoclast
heresy, heterodoxy, unorthodoxy - any opinions or doctrines at variance with the official or orthodox position
Translations

iconoclasm

[aɪˈkɒnəˌklæzəm] Niconoclastia f

iconoclasm

n (lit, fig)Bilderstürmerei f
References in classic literature ?
Born into an extreme Protestant family, but outraged by the wanton iconoclasm of the triumphant Puritans, and deprived by them of his fellowship, at Cambridge, he became a Catholic and died a canon in the church of the miracle-working Lady (Virgin Mary) of Loretto in Italy.
The Bluffer's Guide style is tailor-made for Ashforth's mischievous sense of humour, and what emerges is a characteristic mix of iconoclasm and enthusiasm that will be instantly recognisable to fans of the writer's distinctive style.
This seems to be an era of iconoclasm and iconoclasts in both the senses of image-breakers and radicals.
Iconoclasm from Antiquity to Modernity eds Kristine Kolrud and Marina Prusac
Yet a century later these temples lay derelict, the god's images, names, and titles all erased in an orgy of iconoclasm by Akhenaten, the devotee of a single sun-god.
While iconoclasm is well documented in the West, most notably among Byzantines and Protestants, very little work has been done in surveying, much less analyzing, iconoclastic acts throughout East Asia.
This summary of Leslie Brubaker and John Haldon's Byzantium in the Iconoclast Era has the same primary purpose as that longer book: to show that what Byzantine sources and most modern scholars have said about iconoclasm is false.
Instead, we're coaxed along a trail in which the primal ferocity of religious iconoclasm gets sublimated into politics and eventually domesticated into mere 'Aesthetics'.
The topics include theurgy and aesthetics in Dionysios the Areopagite, Proklos and Plethon on beauty, Agathias and the icon of the Archangel Michael, transcendent exemplarism and immanent realism in the philosophical work of John of Damaskos, and the historical memory of Byzantine iconoclasm in the 14th century as illustrated by Nikephoros Gregoras and Philotheos Kokkinos.
While his study of iconoclasm vacillates, he also promises an opportunity for the reader to "learn to think a bit more iconoclastically by understanding how the three key brain circuits work.
In this issue of Logos, Natalie Carnes calls our attention to two recent books on iconoclasm and offers a typology of iconoclasm as a preparation for the renewal of a theology of images.
Breaking with historicist accounts of early modern images in terms of political and religious iconophobia and iconoclasm, James Knapp offers a fascinating and original study of early modern "visuality"--encompassing a range of experiences including ekphrasis and images in the mind's eye--and the ethical questions it provoked.