iconoclast


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal.

i·con·o·clast

 (ī-kŏn′ə-klăst′)
n.
1. One who attacks and seeks to overthrow traditional or popular ideas or institutions.
2. One who destroys sacred religious images.

[French iconoclaste, from Medieval Greek eikonoklastēs, smasher of religious images : eikono-, icono- + Greek -klastēs, breaker (from klān, klas-, to break).]

i·con′o·clas′tic adj.
i·con′o·clas′ti·cal·ly adv.
Word History: Among the Ten Commandments found in the Bible is the following: "Thou shalt not make unto thee a graven image, or any likeness of any thing that is in heaven above, or that is in the earth beneath, or that is in the water under the earth." In the 8th and 9th centuries, these words inspired some Christians of the Byzantine Empire to destroy religious images such as paintings and sculptures of Jesus, the Virgin Mary, and the saints. The Medieval Greek word for a person who destroyed such images was eikonoklastēs, formed from the elements eikōn, "image, likeness," and -klastēs, "breaker," and the Medieval Greek word is the source of the English word iconoclast. In addition to simply destroying many paintings and sculptures, the Medieval Greek iconoclasts also sought to have them barred from display and veneration. In English, the word iconoclast was originally used in reference to these Byzantine iconoclasts. During the Protestant Reformation, however, images in churches were again felt to be idolatrous and were once more banned and destroyed, and the word iconoclast came to be used of the Protestant opponents of graven images, too. In the 19th century, iconoclast took on the secular sense that it has today.

iconoclast

(aɪˈkɒnəˌklæst)
n
1. a person who attacks established or traditional concepts, principles, laws, etc
2.
a. a destroyer of religious images or sacred objects
b. an adherent of the heretical movement within the Greek Orthodox Church from 725 to 842 ad, which aimed at the destruction of icons and religious images
[C16: from Late Latin iconoclastes, from Late Greek eikonoklastes, from eikōn icon + klastēs breaker]
iˌconoˈclastic adj
iˌconoˈclastically adv

i•con•o•clast

(aɪˈkɒn əˌklæst)

n.
1. a person who attacks cherished beliefs or traditional institutions as being based on error or superstition.
2. a breaker or destroyer of images, esp. those set up for religious veneration.
[1590–1600; < Medieval Latin īconoclastēs < Medieval Greek eikonoklástēs= Greek eikono- icono- + -klastēs breaker, agentive derivative of klân to break]
i•con`o•clas′tic, adj.
i•con`o•clas′ti•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iconoclast - a destroyer of images used in religious worshipiconoclast - a destroyer of images used in religious worship
ruiner, uprooter, waster, destroyer, undoer - a person who destroys or ruins or lays waste to; "a destroyer of the environment"; "jealousy was his undoer"; "uprooters of gravestones"
2.iconoclast - someone who attacks cherished ideas or traditional institutions
aggressor, assailant, assaulter, attacker - someone who attacks

iconoclast

noun rebel, radical, dissident, heretic He was an iconoclast who refused to be bound by tradition.
Translations

iconoclast

[aɪˈkɒnəklæst] Niconoclasta mf

iconoclast

[aɪˈkɒnəklæst] niconoclaste mf

iconoclast

n (lit)Bilderstürmer m, → Ikonoklast m (liter); (fig)Bilderstürmer(in) m(f)

iconoclast

[aɪˈkɒnəklæst] n (frm) → iconoclasta m/f
References in classic literature ?
Considering how many hundreds of statues of the great Emperor must exist in London, it is too much to suppose such a coincidence as that a promiscuous iconoclast should chance to begin upon three specimens of the same bust.
iconoclast saith: "Ye shall have none at all, for ye need them not;
He will be as indefatigable in defending our historical edifices as our iconoclasts of the schools and academies are eager in attacking them; for it is a grievous thing to see into what hands the architecture of the Middle Ages has fallen, and in what a manner the botchers of plaster of the present day treat the ruin of this grand art, it is even a shame for us intelligent men who see them at work and content ourselves with hooting them.
Better, it is a collection of defiantly grouchy anecdotes from an iconoclast in business as well as music.
30) The truest iconophile, for Type B, is also a kind of iconoclast.
The author having been an iconoclast since his youth, the book is as much a story about a back-to-the-land Vermont farmer coming to collaborate with government as the story of the bats for whose benefit the forested land was managed.
Without them, the iconoclast stands no chance of achieving success.
John of Damascus in his turn dealt with them in the same extensive way during the Iconoclast period.
Marion Elizabeth Rodgers Mencken: The American Iconoclast.
In the end, as with any iconoclast, such concerns are irrelevant--in Saul's case perhaps all the more so since the record clearly demonstrates he has been "inside" all along.
LANCASTER -- Iconoclast rock musician and nonconformist composer Frank Zappa once as a teenager was arrested while walking down Lancaster Boulevard, in what he believed was an authoritarian attempt to stop his R&B band from playing at a Lancaster Woman's Club dance.
I have always been a heretic and now since I have retired, I can be an iconoclast as well.