iconography

(redirected from iconographies)
Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia.
Related to iconographies: iconographical

i·co·nog·ra·phy

 (ī′kə-nŏg′rə-fē)
n. pl. i·co·nog·ra·phies
1.
a. Pictorial illustration of a subject.
b. The collected representations illustrating a subject.
2. A set of specified or traditional symbolic forms associated with the subject or theme of a stylized work of art.
3. A treatise or book dealing with iconography.

[Late Latin īconographia, description, verbal sketch, from Medieval Greek eikonographiā : eikono-, icono- + -graphiā, -graphy.]

i′co·nog′ra·pher n.
i·con′o·graph′ic (ī-kŏn′ə-grăf′ĭk), i·con′o·graph′i·cal adj.

iconography

(ˌaɪkɒˈnɒɡrəfɪ)
n, pl -phies
1. (Art Terms)
a. the symbols used in a work of art or art movement
b. the conventional significance attached to such symbols
2. (Art Terms) a collection of pictures of a particular subject, such as Christ
3. (Art Terms) the representation of the subjects of icons or portraits, esp on coins
ˌicoˈnographer n
iconographic, iˌconoˈgraphical adj

i•co•nog•ra•phy

(ˌaɪ kəˈnɒg rə fi)

n., pl. -phies.
1. symbolic representation, esp. the conventional meanings attached to an image.
2. subject matter in the visual arts, esp. with reference to the conventions of treating a subject in artistic representation.
3. the study or analysis of subject matter and its meaning in the visual arts; iconology.
4. a representation or group of representations of a person, place, or thing.
[1620–30; < Medieval Latin < Greek]
i`co•nog′ra•pher, n.
i•con•o•graph•ic (aɪˌkɒn əˈgræf ɪk) i•con`o•graph′i•cal, adj.
i•con`o•graph′i•cal•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.iconography - the images and symbolic representations that are traditionally associated with a person or a subjecticonography - the images and symbolic representations that are traditionally associated with a person or a subject; "religious iconography"; "the propagandistic iconography of a despot"
ikon, picture, icon, image - a visual representation (of an object or scene or person or abstraction) produced on a surface; "they showed us the pictures of their wedding"; "a movie is a series of images projected so rapidly that the eye integrates them"
Translations

iconography

[ˌaɪkɒˈnɒgrəfɪ] Niconografía f

iconography

[ˌaɪkəˈnɒgrəfi] niconographie f

iconography

[ˌaɪkɒˈnɒgrəfɪ] niconografia
References in periodicals archive ?
Given the general validity of the categories he has identified in their capacity to characterize specific iconographies, perhaps it would be more useful to label them according to their interpretive stance toward Don Quixote rather than their origins in a given nation.
Lee's interest in athletic iconographies has no better, or better-known, ambassador than the flamboyant Mars Blackmon, the likable loser who is one of Nola Darling's suitors in the breakthrough 1986 film, She's Gotta Have It.
Rather than answer those "why" questions directly, I thought I would pursue briefly the theme of translation and then look more at length at Invention of Hysteria as a book about photography as much as hysteria, such that its "photographic iconography" portion would be just as important as the headlined part of the title; such that everything said about hysteria and its invention could be translated into a statement about photography and its spread as a medium of documentation, as the modern provider of iconographies.