ictus

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ic·tus

 (ĭk′təs)
n. pl. ictus or ic·tus·es
1. Medicine A sudden attack, blow, stroke, or seizure.
2. The accent that falls on a stressed syllable in a line of scanned verse.

[Latin, stroke, from past participle of īcere, to strike.]

ictus

(ˈɪktəs)
n, pl -tuses or -tus
1. (Poetry) prosody metrical or rhythmic stress in verse feet, as contrasted with the stress accent on words
2. (Medicine) med a sudden attack or stroke
[C18: from Latin icere to strike]
ˈictal adj

ic•tus

(ˈɪk təs)

n., pl. -tus•es, -tus.
1. rhythmical or metrical stress in verse.
2.
a. an epileptic seizure.
b. a stroke, esp. a cerebrovascular accident.
[1700–10; < Latin: stroke, thrust]
ic′tic, adj.

ictus

- The beat of the pulse, based on the Latin word for "stroke."
See also related terms for pulse.

ictus

Medicine. 1. a stroke or beat, as the beat of the pulse. See also verse.
2. a paralytic stroke.
See also: Body, Human
the stress or accent that indicates the rhythm of a verse or piece of music. See also music.
See also: Verse
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ictus - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a diseaseictus - a sudden occurrence (or recurrence) of a disease; "he suffered an epileptic seizure"
attack - a sudden occurrence of an uncontrollable condition; "an attack of diarrhea"
convulsion - violent uncontrollable contractions of muscles
focal seizure - transitory disturbance in motor or sensory function resulting from abnormal cortical activity
raptus hemorrhagicus - seizure caused by a sudden profuse hemorrhage
absence seizure, absence - the occurrence of an abrupt, transient loss or impairment of consciousness (which is not subsequently remembered), sometimes with light twitching, fluttering eyelids, etc.; common in petit mal epilepsy
Translations

ictus

n pl <ictuses or ictus> (Liter) → Iktus m, → Versakzent m

ictus

[ˈɪktəs] nictus m inv

ic·tus

n. ictus, ataque súbito.
References in periodicals archive ?
The rhyming words mark the first strong beat in every fourth bar, each line having four ictuses or beats, with the fourth bar straddling the end of the line.