idealism


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i·de·al·ism

 (ī-dē′ə-lĭz′əm)
n.
1. The act or practice of envisioning things in an ideal and often impractical form.
2. Pursuit of one's ideals, often without regard to practical ends.
3. Idealized treatment of a subject in literature or art.
4. Philosophy The theory that the object of external perception, in itself or as perceived, consists of ideas.

idealism

(aɪˈdɪəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. belief in or pursuance of ideals
2. the tendency to represent things in their ideal forms, rather than as they are
3. (Philosophy) any of a group of philosophical doctrines that share the monistic view that material objects and the external world do not exist in reality independently of the human mind but are variously creations of the mind or constructs of ideas. Compare materialism2, dualism2
iˈdealist n
iˌdealˈistic adj
iˌdealˈistically adv

i•de•al•ism

(aɪˈdi əˌlɪz əm)

n.
1. the cherishing or pursuit of high or noble principles, purposes, or goals.
2. the practice of idealizing.
3. something idealized; an ideal representation.
4. treatment of subject matter, as in art, in which a mental conception of beauty or form is stressed.
5. any philosophical system or theory that maintains that the real is of the nature of thought or that the object of external perception consists of ideas.
[1790–1800]

idealism

any system or theory that maintains that the real is of the nature of thought or that the object of external perception consists of ideas. Cf. realism.idealist, n.idealistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy

Idealism

 

bullish Optimistic, hopeful, confident. In the world of finance, a “bull” is an investor who speculates in stocks or commodities in anticipation of a profit to be realized when the market prices increase. Thus, the “bull” believes that the general business climate is or will soon be favorable. Bullish is used in other, non-monetary contexts as well.

A related term, bearish, also derived from stock market jargon, describes a pessimistic outlook. Since a “bear” believes financial conditions are worsening, he may try to sell short, hoping to repurchase the stocks or securities at a lower price at some future date. Since both “bulls” and “bears” often buy the rights to trade stocks on margin, i.e., at a percentage of their true market value, the “bear” may, in effect, sell what he has not yet purchased. It has therefore been conjectured that the origin of bear may lie in the proverb to sell the bearskin before one has caught the bear. As early as 1721, Nathan Bailey’s Universal Etymological English Dictionary included the following: “to sell a bear: to sell what one hath not.”

hitch one’s wagon to a star To aim high, to have high ideals, to be idealistic. Ralph Waldo Emerson apparently coined this metaphor which appeared in his Society and Solitude (1870):

Now that is the wisdom of a man
… to hitch his wagon to a star.

look through rose-colored glasses To be cheerfully optimistic; to see things in a bright, rosy, favorable light. The color of a rose has long connoted optimism, cheerfulness, and promise.

Oxford was a sort of Utopia to the Captain…. He continued … to behold towers, and quadrangles, and chapels, … through rose-coloured spectacles. (Thomas Hughes, Tom Brown at Oxford, 1861)

Implicit in this expression is the suggestion that a rosy view is unwarranted, perhaps even detrimental.

Pollyanna An incurable optimist. This expression comes from Eleanor Porter’s book Pollyanna, in which the title character was a cheery little girl whose blitheness and buoyancy raised the spirits of all whom she met. In contemporary usage, however, this term is often applied disparagingly to one who exists in a fool’s paradise.

idealism

The notion that the objects of reality do not have independent existence but are constructs of the mind, or made up of ideas.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idealism - (philosophy) the philosophical theory that ideas are the only reality
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.idealism - impracticality by virtue of thinking of things in their ideal form rather than as they really are
impracticality - concerned with theoretical possibilities rather than actual use
romanticism - impractical romantic ideals and attitudes
knight errantry, quixotism - quixotic (romantic and impractical) behavior
3.idealism - elevated ideals or conduct; the quality of believing that ideals should be pursued
magnanimousness, nobleness, grandeur, nobility - the quality of elevation of mind and exaltation of character or ideals or conduct

idealism

noun romanticism, Utopianism, quixotism She never lost her respect for the idealism of the 1960s.
Quotations
"Idealism is the noble toga that political gentlemen drape over their will to power" [Aldous Huxley]
Translations
مِثالِيَّه
idealismus
idealisme
idealizmus
hugsjónastefna; hughyggja
idealizmus

idealism

[aɪˈdɪəlɪzəm] Nidealismo m

idealism

[aɪˈdɪəlɪzəm] nidéalisme m

idealism

nIdealismus m

idealism

[aɪˈdɪəˌlɪzm] nidealismo

ideal

(aiˈdiəl) adjective
perfect. This tool is ideal for the job I have in mind.
noun
1. a person, thing etc that is looked on as being perfect. She was clever and beautiful – in fact she was his ideal of what a wife should be.
2. a person's standard of behaviour etc. a man of high ideals.
iˈdealist noun
a person having (too) high ideals of behaviour etc.
iˈdealism noun
ˌideaˈlistic (aidiə-) adjective
iˈdealize, iˈdealise verb
to regard as perfect. Children tend to idealize their parents.
iˌdealiˈzation, iˌdealiˈsation noun
iˈdeally adverb
1. perfectly. He is ideally suited to this job.
2. under perfect conditions. Ideally, we should check this again, but we haven't enough time.
References in classic literature ?
I challenge a new generation of YOUNG Americans to a season of service, to act on your idealism, by helping troubled children, keeping company with those in need, reconnecting our torn communities.
All the warmth of his idealism is concentrated upon a certain 'Americain, Catholique et gentil-homme.
He is even unduly impatient of Plato's idealism, as is shown by the criticisms in the second book.
Their vague idealism, the suspicion of a philosophical idea which underlay the titles they gave their pictures, accorded very well with the functions of art as from his diligent perusal of Ruskin he understood it; but here was something quite different: here was no moral appeal; and the contemplation of these works could help no one to lead a purer and a higher life.
If an imaginative boy has a sufficiently rich mother who has intelligence, personal grace, dignity of character without harshness, and a cultivated sense of the best art of her time to enable her to make her house beautiful, she sets a standard for him against which very few women can struggle, besides effecting for him a disengagement of his affections, his sense of beauty, and his idealism from his specifically sexual impulses.
Idealism led him to philosophic anarchy, and his family threw him off.
Amongst the revolutionists I found, also, warm faith in the human, ardent idealism, sweetnesses of unselfishness, renunciation, and martyrdom--all the splendid, stinging things of the spirit.
The idealism of Plato is here presented in a less developed form than in the Phaedo and Phaedrus.
Romance may be called Idealism in the realm of sentiment.
The women's rougher, simpler, more upright judgment, embraces the whole truth, which their tact, their mistrust of masculine idealism, ever prevents them from speaking in its entirety.
He is the father of idealism in philosophy, in politics, in literature.
How far Joan, her sister and partner, shared this slightly prosaic idealism no one could be very sure.