identity politics


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identity politics

n. (used with a sing. or pl. verb)
Political attitudes or positions that focus on the concerns of social groups identified mainly on the basis of gender, race, ethnicity, or sexual orientation.
References in periodicals archive ?
Left for Dead doesn't even wave to Todd Gitlin, with his book-long critique of identity politics, or Ralph Nader, who rejects as distracting "gonadal politics," those gay and feminist issues that get in the way of his economic agenda, or Michael Lerner, who is forever trying to get the left to take up the kind of "family values" that presumably appeal to the white working class.
Combine social and economic liberalism and you get left-liberalism, which is mired in identity politics and offers next to nothing for the white working class.
The New York-based Joo, who represented South Korea at the 2001 Venice Biennale, engages identity politics with minimalist sculptural installations and ersatz science.
Perhaps the best way to learn something from the Deaf Pride movement is to see it as a reductio ad absurdum of modern identity politics.
Scholars wedded to normative identity politics may be vexed or flummoxed by these critical sleights of hand.
Name recognition, identity politics and big money dominated in the primary election, but it's going to take a direct and persuasive appeal to all of Los Angeles to win the runoff and, more importantly, to lead the city for the next four challenging years.
Many activists find the challenge to identity politics too threatening to the way they view the world," he says.
No coherent group perspectives are decreed automatically by nature or by social and economic "laws," and this applies to class consciousness as well as identity politics.
This volume explores the ways in which Taiwan is imaged and imagined and how this relates to identity politics.
Identity politics and the new genetics; re/creating categories of difference and belonging.
His book appears in this confusing transitional era, between Cold War and "New World Order," between identity politics and an oft-obfuscated struggle in which demands for justice and equality are thought to be based on skin color, sexual orientation, or gender alone, rather than class affiliation.
Sansavoir considers themes of post-colonial issues, literary autobiography, political literature and literature as political engagement, immigration and globalization's effects on Francophone Caribbean identity, race and gender in North American identity politics, literary and identitarian interviews, and more.