idiolect


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id·i·o·lect

 (ĭd′ē-ə-lĕkt′)
n.
The speech of an individual, considered as a linguistic pattern unique among speakers of his or her language or dialect.


id′i·o·lec′tal, id′i·o·lec′tic adj.

idiolect

(ˈɪdɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) the variety or form of a language used by an individual
ˌidioˈlectal, ˌidioˈlectic adj

id•i•o•lect

(ˈɪd i əˌlɛkt)

n.
a person's individual speech pattern.
[1945–50; idio- + -lect, as in dialect]
id`i•o•lec′tal, adj.

idiolect

a person’s individual speech habits.
See also: Linguistics

idiolect

The variety of a language that is used by an individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiolect - the language or speech of one individual at a particular period in life
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
Translations

idiolect

[ˈɪdɪəʊlekt] Nidiolecto m

idiolect

nIdiolekt m
References in periodicals archive ?
By virtue of a reverential procedure rendered traditional in critical practice, the idiolect of the auctor establishes authority and goes perhaps even beyond his wishes.
In the first place, each individualised character has an idiolect or 'linguistic thumbprint': distinctive linguistic features of their speech and thought.
10) In 2006, the results for the group with an elementary education the results are based on an idiolect because only one informant could be re-recorded.
The unit rounds off with a look at family talk over time, which not only consolidates the work on idiolect but also touches on the subject of scripted speech in television soaps and sit-coms.
Monitored thought is thus the narrator's mimicry of a character's inner speech; it represents the deliberate blending of the potentially disjunctive idiolect of a particular character with the norm established by the narrator.
The emotive or affective component of a linguistic expression (such as style, idiolect, dialect, and emotional charge), which is superimposed upon its basic meaning and which--in contrast to the static conceptual meaning--is difficult to describe generally and context-independently" (Bussmann 1996).
Part of his intention is to argue that in a sense language is more a matter of idiolect than of language as philosophers conceive of "language.
Moore selects Jethro Tull for discussion, a band whose idiolect did not lose its identity despite changes in style over a lengthy career.
When his characters speak, it is often with a literary idiolect, a life that exists within words in which voice becomes song.
Both in the idiolect of theoretical physics and everyday talk in English, there is a condensation of the temporal and the spatial.
If attribution research is to be done, it needs to attend to what authorship itself is and to what traits make good measures of idiolect.
Nikolaou's poetry has two main characteristics: first, it often employs with gusto local Cypriot diction; second, its idiolect marks the zenith of modernism (c.