idiolect

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id·i·o·lect

 (ĭd′ē-ə-lĕkt′)
n.
The speech of an individual, considered as a linguistic pattern unique among speakers of his or her language or dialect.


id′i·o·lec′tal, id′i·o·lec′tic adj.

idiolect

(ˈɪdɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) the variety or form of a language used by an individual
ˌidioˈlectal, ˌidioˈlectic adj

id•i•o•lect

(ˈɪd i əˌlɛkt)

n.
a person's individual speech pattern.
[1945–50; idio- + -lect, as in dialect]
id`i•o•lec′tal, adj.

idiolect

a person’s individual speech habits.
See also: Linguistics

idiolect

The variety of a language that is used by an individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiolect - the language or speech of one individual at a particular period in life
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
Translations

idiolect

[ˈɪdɪəʊlekt] Nidiolecto m

idiolect

nIdiolekt m
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus idiolects are relatively stable--our background and upbringing do not change.
The public languages grounding the work of prescriptive grammarians are fundamentally different from the idiolects grounding the work of scientific linguists.
The meaning of "bachelor," in many English idiolects, is identical to the meaning of "unmarried man.
Without these idiolects, and many, many more, he could never have revitalized the American novel and turned it into Bellow country.
The nine chapters that make up the main body of the text are organized in three parts, covering the experience of Polish children in Sweden from a socio-linguistic perspective, idiolects of Polish Children living in Sweden, and the category of case.
Sardinia is in principle a linguistic continuum which, although containing identifiable sub-types, fulfills the definition of a classic language complex as presented by Hockett (1958: 323 ff) and elaborated by ten Hacken (2005: 254): 'An L-complex is a set of idiolects such that any pair of idiolects in the set is linked by a chain of mutually intelligible idiolects,' with the implication that as distance increases, ease of mutual intelligibility wanes.
It identifies spoken languages as idiolects, in line roughly with Chomskyan Ilanguages.
However, Turell (2010) asserts that to describe idiolects, one should analyse large amounts of linguistic data, oral and written, of each individual, which would be an impossible task in real situations.
By heteroglossia, Bakhtin means not a profusion of different literal languages but rather a congeries of idiolects, all of which may belong to a single language.
Few novelists can compete with her ability to create idiolects.
Such is the case of Burrows's (1987) research on the idiolects in Austen's work, Hori's (2004) investigation of Dickens's style by means of a collocational approach, and the pieces of research conducted by Hope and Whitmore (2004) and Rybicky (2008) on the idiolects of several Shakespeare's characters.
His theatre gives priority to dialogue, a characteristic feature of theatre as literature, and his characters breathe their lives through their idiolects, marked by speech acts, implicatures and polyphonic utterances.