idiolect

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id·i·o·lect

 (ĭd′ē-ə-lĕkt′)
n.
The speech of an individual, considered as a linguistic pattern unique among speakers of his or her language or dialect.


id′i·o·lec′tal, id′i·o·lec′tic adj.

idiolect

(ˈɪdɪəˌlɛkt)
n
(Linguistics) the variety or form of a language used by an individual
ˌidioˈlectal, ˌidioˈlectic adj

id•i•o•lect

(ˈɪd i əˌlɛkt)

n.
a person's individual speech pattern.
[1945–50; idio- + -lect, as in dialect]
id`i•o•lec′tal, adj.

idiolect

a person’s individual speech habits.
See also: Linguistics

idiolect

The variety of a language that is used by an individual.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiolect - the language or speech of one individual at a particular period in life
speech communication, spoken communication, spoken language, voice communication, oral communication, speech, language - (language) communication by word of mouth; "his speech was garbled"; "he uttered harsh language"; "he recorded the spoken language of the streets"
Translations

idiolect

[ˈɪdɪəʊlekt] Nidiolecto m

idiolect

nIdiolekt m
References in periodicals archive ?
It identifies spoken languages as idiolects, in line roughly with Chomskyan Ilanguages.
It is quiet and subtle and exceedingly complex, much like the ordinary influences that produce our own dialects and idiolects in "ordinary language.
In short, it is worth asking whether words in these texts may always to some extent be "fighting" words, and to what extent Delia and Olga may even have their own idiolects of defense.
Without these idiolects, and many, many more, he could never have revitalized the American novel and turned it into Bellow country.
Few novelists can compete with her ability to create idiolects.
4) For that reason the results of the 2006 analysis are in some places more reliant on idiolects.
According to Altoma (1969), the problem of diglossia makes a lot of variations in syntax, morphology and phonology between Modem Standard Arabic and colloquial Arabic on one side and among various distinct dialects and idiolects on the other side.
Higgins is a seeming anomaly in Irish poetry--a working class poet who is 'inassimilable' to a literary middle class, a woman who resists gentrification in favour of her unique poetic vernacular, with its insistence on the uncomfortable thematics of class and social inequity, its aural patternings influenced by liturgy, prayer, and idiolects of local parishes and communities of working class Galway.
Spicer's essay "Reggatta de Blanc" aims to confront stylistic eclecticism in the music of The Police, and, indeed, to serve as a model for analyzing the stylistic idiolects of similarly eclectic artists.
The idiolects of individuals are each a little different, usages in different subcultures somewhat more so, and in dialects even more so.
It created tight schools of thought, each one developing its own idiolects and semiotic grids.
12) To recognize and identify the phonological systematics of poetic idiolects also does in all likelihood require enhanced proficiency in reading and construing poetic texts, and to characterize such features as indigenous within procedures of poetic composition probably also requires experience of original poetic authorship.