idiomatically


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Related to idiomatically: idiomatic expression

id·i·o·mat·ic

 (ĭd′ē-ə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Peculiar to or characteristic of a given language.
b. Characterized by proficient use of idiomatic expressions: a foreigner who speaks idiomatic English.
2. Resembling or having the nature of an idiom.
3. Using many idioms.
4. Peculiar to or characteristic of the style or manner of a particular group or people.

id′i·o·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.idiomatically - in an idiomatic manner; "he expressed himself idiomatically"
Translations
إصْطِلاحِيًّا
idiomaticky
idiomatisktmundret
idiomatikusan
samkvæmt málvenju
idiomaticky
deyimsel olarak

idiomatically

[ˌɪdɪəˈmætɪkəlɪ] ADVidiomáticamente

idiomatically

advidiomatisch

idiomatically

[ˌɪdɪəˈmætɪklɪ] advin modo idiomatico

idiom

(ˈidiəm) noun
1. an expression with a meaning that cannot be guessed from the meanings of the individual words. His mother passed away (= died) this morning.
2. the expressions of a language in general. English idiom.
ˌidioˈmatic (-ˈmӕtik) adjective
(negative unidiomatic).
1. using an idiom. an idiomatic use of this word.
2. using appropriate idioms. We try to teach idiomatic English.
ˌidioˈmatically adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
As a player myself (Philip is a violinist who has played within many professional orchestras) I appreciate a composer working with an orchestra, that is to say writing idiomatically for the instruments and with content and style which resonate with the players.
Idiomatically speaking, change hands: to pass from one owner to another; change (one's) mind: to reverse a previous held opinion or an earlier decision; change (one's) tune: to alter one's approach or attitude.
The song's Scots title may be translated into standard English as "old long since", or more idiomatically, "long long ago", "days gone by" or "old times".
Despite being only two seasons old, PSL has already become a seasonal sporting festival compelling cricket buffs to cross out dates on the calendar for the countdown - at least idiomatically.
Especially in the fields of rhythm and texture, he is very innovative, and since he was a pianist himself, his pieces are written very idiomatically, "pianistically".
The Italian victims' testimony upon which prosecutors rested their case against Louis Till contained critical contradictions in some places and language so idiomatically American in others that it seemed coached.
This saying ordinarily refers to a large body part, the buttocks, but it is very neutral when considered idiomatically.
The fact that only the first two forms are idiomatically translated in the present tense in European languages does not necessarily behoove us to assume a different temporal/aspectual reference in the source language.
The orchestra, directed by Daniel Taylor and Adrian Butterfield, was idiomatically Baroque-sounding.
There are other expressions in Sesotho also containing the word molamu, for example, ho bea molamu fatshe, literally translated, "to put the stick on the ground", and idiomatically translated, "to throw in the towel, to give up".
In this reviewer's estimation, the translations presented here admirably achieve the aim set out by the series' editors: "to be faithful to the Latin while reading idiomatically in English.
Making his debut in an opera for the company, Aleksandar Markovic, who has already conducted two Kirklees concerts, conducts as idiomatically as you would expect from the ex-music director of Brno Philharmonic and obtains stunning playing from the orchestra.