idiomatically


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Related to idiomatically: idiomatic expression

id·i·o·mat·ic

 (ĭd′ē-ə-măt′ĭk)
adj.
1.
a. Peculiar to or characteristic of a given language.
b. Characterized by proficient use of idiomatic expressions: a foreigner who speaks idiomatic English.
2. Resembling or having the nature of an idiom.
3. Using many idioms.
4. Peculiar to or characteristic of the style or manner of a particular group or people.

id′i·o·mat′i·cal·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.idiomatically - in an idiomatic manner; "he expressed himself idiomatically"
Translations
إصْطِلاحِيًّا
idiomaticky
idiomatisktmundret
idiomatikusan
samkvæmt málvenju
idiomaticky
deyimsel olarak

idiomatically

[ˌɪdɪəˈmætɪkəlɪ] ADVidiomáticamente

idiomatically

advidiomatisch

idiomatically

[ˌɪdɪəˈmætɪklɪ] advin modo idiomatico

idiom

(ˈidiəm) noun
1. an expression with a meaning that cannot be guessed from the meanings of the individual words. His mother passed away (= died) this morning.
2. the expressions of a language in general. English idiom.
ˌidioˈmatic (-ˈmӕtik) adjective
(negative unidiomatic).
1. using an idiom. an idiomatic use of this word.
2. using appropriate idioms. We try to teach idiomatic English.
ˌidioˈmatically adverb
References in periodicals archive ?
What do we mean when we say, idiomatically, that something goes far into the heart?
lexical, or restricted co-occurrence, considerations deal with the cases when a meaning is expressed idiomatically with respect to L, that is, to put it differently, is phraseologically-bound by L.
That is to say, "line of business" represents the first grade of development, from which "line" has been detached and is established idiomatically in the phrase "in the (potato) line", and, further, this form of idiom has developed a transferred and figurative sense, as in "appleplexy line" (P 45) / "(Eh?
This is usually expressed idiomatically in the lingua franca Tok Pisin as 'tanim bel', literally 'turning the stomach', and requires that people renounce any practices considered to be the workings of evil spirits.
In letter 37, she states, again idiomatically, "i want to take my ghosts, Alicia, confront them face to face, snarl at them, stick out my tongue, wiggle my fingers from the sides of my head, nya-nya
Elspeth Dutch's horns were idiomatically outstanding in Schumann's leaping, exultant Rhenish Symphony, matched by commandingly noble trombones.
As Betz explains, Chadwick also displayed his determination to learn how to write idiomatically for string instruments by taking a few violin lessons with Henry Schradieck, and getting hands-on advice from Friedrich Herrmann, violist in the Gewandhaus Quartet.
After being sure about the consistency (compatibility) among people 's opinions we should convert the pair comparison matrix of fuzzy scale in to certain scale which idiomatically is called "defuzzification of fuzzy pair comparison matrix" and in this research, Opricovic and Tzeng [10]'s approach was used for defuzzification of elites' fuzzy answers & you can see them in equations 5 to 12.
Paulin's maneuvering of a very convincing (but purely padded) pregnant bulge was as expertly comic as her tartly sparkling singing was idiomatically spot-on.
The opulent, often visually striking Gioconda was created by Allen Charles Klein for the Florida Grand Opera and Fort Worth Opera, idiomatically conducted by Anton Guadagno and directed by Dejan Miladnovic.
She has a graceful musicality, and an innate ability to respond idiomatically to the mainstream composers of the operatic repertoire.
The "Close Reading" is the portion of the program most idiomatically multimedia.