idiom

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id·i·om

 (ĭd′ē-əm)
n.
1. A speech form or an expression of a given language that is peculiar to itself grammatically or cannot be understood from the individual meanings of its elements, as in keep tabs on.
2. The specific grammatical, syntactic, and structural character of a given language.
3. Regional speech or dialect.
4. A specialized vocabulary used by a group of people; jargon: legal idiom.
5. A style of artistic expression characteristic of a particular individual, school, period, or medium: the idiom of the French impressionists; the punk rock idiom.

[Late Latin idiōma, idiōmat-, from Greek, from idiousthai, to make one's own, from idios, own, personal, private; see s(w)e- in Indo-European roots.]

idiom

(ˈɪdɪəm)
n
1. (Linguistics) a group of words whose meaning cannot be predicted from the meanings of the constituent words, as for example (It was raining) cats and dogs
2. (Linguistics) linguistic usage that is grammatical and natural to native speakers of a language
3. (Linguistics) the characteristic vocabulary or usage of a specific human group or subject
4. (Art Terms) the characteristic artistic style of an individual, school, period, etc
[C16: from Latin idiōma peculiarity of language, from Greek; see idio-]
idiomatic, ˌidioˈmatical adj
ˌidioˈmatically adv
ˌidioˈmaticalness n

id•i•om

(ˈɪd i əm)

n.
1. an expression whose meaning is not predictable from the usual grammatical rules of a language or from the usual meanings of its constituent elements, as kick the bucket “to die.”
2. a language, dialect, or style of speaking peculiar to a people.
3. a construction or expression peculiar to a language.
4. the manner of expression characteristic of or peculiar to a language.
5. a distinct style or character, as in music or art.
[1565–75; < Latin idiōma < Greek idíōma peculiarity, specific property]

idiom

A group of words with a meaning that cannot be deduced from its constituent parts, such as “at the end of my tether;” also used to mean the vocabulary of a particular group.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiom - a manner of speaking that is natural to native speakers of a language
formulation, expression - the style of expressing yourself; "he suggested a better formulation"; "his manner of expression showed how much he cared"
2.idiom - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of peopleidiom - the usage or vocabulary that is characteristic of a specific group of people; "the immigrants spoke an odd dialect of English"; "he has a strong German accent"; "it has been said that a language is a dialect with an army and navy"
non-standard speech - speech that differs from the usual accepted, easily recognizable speech of native adult members of a speech community
eye dialect - the use of misspellings to identify a colloquial or uneducated speaker
patois - a regional dialect of a language (especially French); usually considered substandard
spang, bang - leap, jerk, bang; "Bullets spanged into the trees"
forrad, forrard, forward, forwards, frontward, frontwards - at or to or toward the front; "he faced forward"; "step forward"; "she practiced sewing backward as well as frontward on her new sewing machine"; (`forrad' and `forrard' are dialectal variations)
3.idiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movementidiom - the style of a particular artist or school or movement; "an imaginative orchestral idiom"
baroqueness, baroque - elaborate and extensive ornamentation in decorative art and architecture that flourished in Europe in the 17th century
classical style - the artistic style of ancient Greek art with its emphasis on proportion and harmony
order - (architecture) one of original three styles of Greek architecture distinguished by the type of column and entablature used or a style developed from the original three by the Romans
rococo - fanciful but graceful asymmetric ornamentation in art and architecture that originated in France in the 18th century
fashion, manner, mode, style, way - how something is done or how it happens; "her dignified manner"; "his rapid manner of talking"; "their nomadic mode of existence"; "in the characteristic New York style"; "a lonely way of life"; "in an abrasive fashion"
High Renaissance - the artistic style of early 16th century painting in Florence and Rome; characterized by technical mastery and heroic composition and humanistic content
treatment - a manner of dealing with something artistically; "his treatment of space borrows from Italian architecture"
neoclassicism - revival of a classical style (in art or literature or architecture or music) but from a new perspective or with a new motivation
classicalism, classicism - a movement in literature and art during the 17th and 18th centuries in Europe that favored rationality and restraint and strict forms; "classicism often derived its models from the ancient Greeks and Romans"
Romantic Movement, Romanticism - a movement in literature and art during the late 18th and early 19th centuries that celebrated nature rather than civilization; "Romanticism valued imagination and emotion over rationality"
4.idiom - an expression whose meanings cannot be inferred from the meanings of the words that make it up
locution, saying, expression - a word or phrase that particular people use in particular situations; "pardon the expression"
ruralism, rusticism - a rural idiom or expression
in the lurch - in a difficult or vulnerable position; "he resigned and left me in the lurch"
like clockwork - with regularity and precision; "the rocket launch went off like clockwork"

idiom

noun
1. phrase, expression, turn of phrase, locution, set phrase Proverbs and idioms may become worn with over-use.
2. language, talk, style, usage, jargon, vernacular, parlance, mode of expression I was irritated by his use of archaic idiom.

idiom

noun
Specialized expressions indigenous to a particular field, subject, trade, or subculture:
Translations
تعابير اللغة بصورة عامَّهتَعْبير إصْطِلاحي
idiomjazyk
idiomsprogsprogbrugtalemådeudtryksform
idiotismo
frase hechalocuciónmodismo
اصطلاحزبان زد زبانزد
idiomikädenjälkikäsialakielipuheenparsi
idióma
málvenjaorîatiltæki, orîtak
成句方言様式熟語訛り
idiomaidiomatinisidiomatiškaisavita kalbasavitas
idioma, savdabīgs izteiciensidiomātisks izteiciens
idiom
expressão idiomáticaidioma
idióm
fraza
idiom

idiom

[ˈɪdɪəm] N
1. (= phrase) → modismo m, giro m
2. (= style of expression) → lenguaje m

idiom

[ˈɪdiəm] n
(= phrase) → expression f idiomatique
(= style) → facture f

idiom

n
(= special phrase, group of words)idiomatische Wendung, Redewendung f
(= language)Sprache f, → Idiom nt; (of region)Mundart f, → Dialekt m; (of author)Ausdrucksweise f, → Diktion f; … to use the modern idiom… um es modern auszudrücken
(in music, art) → Ausdrucksform f

idiom

[ˈɪdɪəm] n (phrase) → locuzione f idiomatica; (style of expression) → stile m

idiom

(ˈidiəm) noun
1. an expression with a meaning that cannot be guessed from the meanings of the individual words. His mother passed away (= died) this morning.
2. the expressions of a language in general. English idiom.
ˌidioˈmatic (-ˈmӕtik) adjective
(negative unidiomatic).
1. using an idiom. an idiomatic use of this word.
2. using appropriate idioms. We try to teach idiomatic English.
ˌidioˈmatically adverb
References in classic literature ?
He had repaired it with large patches of French, with words anglicized by a process of his own, and with native idioms literally translated.
I assure you I am often surprised at my own fluency, and, when I get a little more practice in the genders and the idioms, I shall do very well in this respect.
For a long time past he had been applying himself to the study of the Arab language and the various Mandingoe idioms, and, thanks to his talents as a polyglot, he had made rapid progress.
Bilibin was now at army headquarters in a diplomatic capacity, and though he wrote in French and used French jests and French idioms, he described the whole campaign with a fearless self-censure and self-derision genuinely Russian.
You might retort," she suggested, "that when an adult is with kindergarten children he must descend to kindergarten idioms in order to make himself intelligible.
If your conscience," says the man with the nose, "is indisposed toward foreign idioms ye might, to please yourself, smuggle the letter into the penultimate syllable.
Neither has it been possible for the writer of it to render the full force of the Zulu idiom nor to convey a picture of the teller.
But, as they said in their idiom, they had eaten their white bread first.
With Women, we speak of "love", "duty", "right", "wrong", "pity", "hope", and other irrational and emotional conceptions, which have no existence, and the fiction of which has no object except to control feminine exuberances; but among ourselves, and in our books, we have an entirely different vocabulary and I may almost say, idiom.
By unusual, I mean strange (or rare) words, metaphorical, lengthened,--anything, in short, that differs from the normal idiom.
And I," replied the visitor, changing his idiom, "know enough of English to keep up the conversation.
The vulgar idiom made the pronunciation an-TONY's nose--and all this Charles briefly explained to Miss Emmerson and her niece by way of giving point to his own wit.