idiosyncrasy

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id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

 (ĭd′ē-ō-sĭng′krə-sē)
n. pl. id·i·o·syn·cra·sies
1. A structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group.
2. A physiological or temperamental peculiarity.
3. An unusual individual reaction to food or a drug.

[Greek idiosunkrāsiā : idio-, idio- + sunkrāsis, mixture, temperament (sun-, syn- + krāsis, a mixing; see kerə- in Indo-European roots).]

id′i·o·syn·crat′ic (-sĭn-krăt′ĭk) adj.
id′i·o·syn·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

idiosyncrasy

(ˌɪdɪəʊˈsɪŋkrəsɪ)
n, pl -sies
1. a tendency, type of behaviour, mannerism, etc, of a specific person; quirk
2. the composite physical or psychological make-up of a specific person
3. (Pathology) an abnormal reaction of an individual to specific foods, drugs, or other agents
[C17: from Greek idiosunkrasia, from idio- + sunkrasis mixture, temperament, from sun- syn- + kerannunai to mingle]

id•i•o•syn•cra•sy

(ˌɪd i əˈsɪŋ krə si, -ˈsɪn-)

n., pl. -sies.
1. a characteristic, habit, mannerism, etc., that is peculiar to or distinctive of an individual.
2. the physical or mental constitution peculiar to an individual.
3. a peculiarity of the physical or mental constitution, esp. a sensitivity to drugs, food, etc.
[1595–1605; < Greek idiosynkrāsía=idio- idio- + syn- syn- + krâsis a blending + -ia -y3]
id`i•o•syn•crat′ic (-oʊ sɪnˈkræt ɪk, -sɪŋ-) adj.
id`i•o•syn•crat′i•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See eccentricity.

idiosyncrasy

a mannerism, action, or form of behavior peculiar to one person or group. — idiosyncratic, idiosyncratical, adj.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiosyncrasy - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individualidiosyncrasy - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individual

idiosyncrasy

noun peculiarity, habit, characteristic, quirk, eccentricity, oddity, mannerism, affectation, trick, singularity, personal trait One of his idiosyncrasies was to wear orange gloves.

idiosyncrasy

noun
Translations
idiosinkrazija
idiossincrasia

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdɪəˈsɪŋkrəsɪ] Nidiosincrasia f
Victorian idiosyncrasyla idiosincrasia victoriana
it's one of her idiosyncrasieses una de sus peculiaridades

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdiəʊˈsɪŋkrəsi] nsingularité f

idiosyncrasy

nEigenheit f, → Eigenart f, → Besonderheit f; (Ling, Med) → Idiosynkrasie f

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdɪəˈsɪŋkrəsɪ] n (peculiarity, foible) → (piccola) mania; (characteristic) → particolarità f inv

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

n. idiosincrasia.
1. características individuales;
2. reacción peculiar de cada persona a una acción, idea, medicamento, tratamiento o alimento.
References in classic literature ?
And when ordinary fellows like you and me attempt to cope with their idiosyncrasies the result is bungling.
Your ship is a tender creature, whose idiosyncrasies must be attended to if you mean her to come with credit to herself and you through the rough-and-tumble of her life.
I have been able to invest them with none of those characteristics which make the persons of a book exist with a real life of their own; and, wondering if the fault is mine, I rack my brains to remember idiosyncrasies which might lend them vividness.
Numa, unaccustomed to the idiosyncrasies of construction of an airship and having gained the forward cockpit, watched the girl clamber out of his reach without at first endeavoring to prevent her.
It was worth while ignoring small idiosyncrasies which might offend, in order to annex him.
Hard by," says he, "is a cafe, snug and suitable for the entertainment of idiosyncrasies.
I wander abroad be night seeking idiosyncrasies in the masses and truth in the heavens above.
Let us have these glasses filled again, for 'tis good to keep idiosyncrasies well moistened, they being subject to deterioration in a dry moral atmosphere.
He argued with himself in extenuation of the girl's peculiar idiosyncrasies.
It's just one of those idiosyncrasies of the calendar.
Richly remembered details and the idiosyncrasies of all his characters are what draw the reader into the universal themes of his stories.
Ms McKinnell said: "The rule book on VAT is a minefield of quirks and idiosyncrasies reflecting different rules that have grown up unevenly over the years as new products have come onto the market.