idiosyncrasy


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Related to idiosyncrasy: drug idiosyncrasy

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

 (ĭd′ē-ō-sĭng′krə-sē)
n. pl. id·i·o·syn·cra·sies
1. A structural or behavioral characteristic peculiar to an individual or group.
2. A physiological or temperamental peculiarity.
3. An unusual individual reaction to food or a drug.

[Greek idiosunkrāsiā : idio-, idio- + sunkrāsis, mixture, temperament (sun-, syn- + krāsis, a mixing; see kerə- in Indo-European roots).]

id′i·o·syn·crat′ic (-sĭn-krăt′ĭk) adj.
id′i·o·syn·crat′i·cal·ly adv.

idiosyncrasy

(ˌɪdɪəʊˈsɪŋkrəsɪ)
n, pl -sies
1. a tendency, type of behaviour, mannerism, etc, of a specific person; quirk
2. the composite physical or psychological make-up of a specific person
3. (Pathology) an abnormal reaction of an individual to specific foods, drugs, or other agents
[C17: from Greek idiosunkrasia, from idio- + sunkrasis mixture, temperament, from sun- syn- + kerannunai to mingle]

id•i•o•syn•cra•sy

(ˌɪd i əˈsɪŋ krə si, -ˈsɪn-)

n., pl. -sies.
1. a characteristic, habit, mannerism, etc., that is peculiar to or distinctive of an individual.
2. the physical or mental constitution peculiar to an individual.
3. a peculiarity of the physical or mental constitution, esp. a sensitivity to drugs, food, etc.
[1595–1605; < Greek idiosynkrāsía=idio- idio- + syn- syn- + krâsis a blending + -ia -y3]
id`i•o•syn•crat′ic (-oʊ sɪnˈkræt ɪk, -sɪŋ-) adj.
id`i•o•syn•crat′i•cal•ly, adv.
syn: See eccentricity.

idiosyncrasy

a mannerism, action, or form of behavior peculiar to one person or group. — idiosyncratic, idiosyncratical, adj.
See also: Behavior
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idiosyncrasy - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individualidiosyncrasy - a behavioral attribute that is distinctive and peculiar to an individual

idiosyncrasy

noun peculiarity, habit, characteristic, quirk, eccentricity, oddity, mannerism, affectation, trick, singularity, personal trait One of his idiosyncrasies was to wear orange gloves.

idiosyncrasy

noun
Translations
idiosinkrazija
idiossincrasia

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdɪəˈsɪŋkrəsɪ] Nidiosincrasia f
Victorian idiosyncrasyla idiosincrasia victoriana
it's one of her idiosyncrasieses una de sus peculiaridades

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdiəʊˈsɪŋkrəsi] nsingularité f

idiosyncrasy

nEigenheit f, → Eigenart f, → Besonderheit f; (Ling, Med) → Idiosynkrasie f

idiosyncrasy

[ˌɪdɪəˈsɪŋkrəsɪ] n (peculiarity, foible) → (piccola) mania; (characteristic) → particolarità f inv

id·i·o·syn·cra·sy

n. idiosincrasia.
1. características individuales;
2. reacción peculiar de cada persona a una acción, idea, medicamento, tratamiento o alimento.
References in classic literature ?
This mode of death had been an idiosyncrasy with his family, for generations past; not often occurring, indeed, but, when it does occur, usually attacking individuals about the Judge's time of life, and generally in the tension of some mental crisis, or, perhaps, in an access of wrath.
That's all we've got,' said my aunt; with whom it was an idiosyncrasy, as it is with some horses, to stop very short when she appeared to be in a fair way of going on for a long while.
With my brow to the glass, I was thus occupied in scrutinizing the mob, when suddenly there came into view a countenance (that of a decrepid old man, some sixty-five or seventy years of age,) - a countenance which at once arrested and absorbed my whole attention, on account of the absolute idiosyncrasy of its expression.
On this subject we had long and animated discussions -- he maintaining the utter groundlessness of faith in such matters, -- I contending that a popular sentiment arising with absolute spontaneity- that is to say, without apparent traces of suggestion -- had in itself the unmistakable elements of truth, and was entitled to as much respect as that intuition which is the idiosyncrasy of the individual man of genius.
Every village has its idiosyncrasy, its constitution, often its own code of morality.
as it told me in so many words), perhaps because it was the writer's idiosyncrasy to put that trust in me, perhaps because it was mine to justify it.
But in spite of the dramatic rudeness which is sometimes of the idiosyncrasy, the true and native colour of his multitudinous dramatis personae, or monologists, Mr.
Partly, from that remarkable idiosyncrasy to which I have before alluded; partly, perhaps, from tenderness to my feelings, or fear to disturb my philosophy by touching upon the infectious theme of love.
They know each tree, its whole history, everything that ever happened to it, its every idiosyncrasy.
I acknowledge to this ridiculous idiosyncrasy, as a reason why I would give them a little more play.