idler

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i·dle

 (īd′l)
adj. i·dler, i·dlest
1.
a. Not employed or busy: idle carpenters. See Synonyms at inactive.
b. Disinclined to work or be active; lazy: "a man who could seem idle, ignorant, even incompetent, yet was able to understand and to express ... the instincts, good and bad, of the American majority" (Godfrey Hodgson).
c. Not in use or operation: idle hands; idle mills.
d. Sports Not scheduled to play a game: Both teams played today but will be idle tomorrow.
2. Being a period of time in which there is little or no activity: passed idle hours watching TV.
3. Lacking substance, value, or basis: idle speculation; idle threats. See Synonyms at baseless, vain.
v. i·dled, i·dling, i·dles
v.intr.
1. To pass time without being engaged in purposeful activity: "The girls idled all day long, sending their tinkling laughter flowing up and down the street" (Alai).
2. To move slowly or without purpose: "I drove past the workshop ... I idled along the driveway past the pole fence ... to Tyhee Road" (Tom Spanbauer).
3. To run at a slow speed or out of gear. Used of a motor or motor vehicle.
v.tr.
1. To pass (time) without doing anything: idle the afternoon away.
2. To make or cause to be unemployed or inactive: layoffs that idled 1,000 factory workers; a plant that was idled by a strike.
3. To cause (a motor, for example) to idle.
n.
1. A state of idling. Used of a motor vehicle: an engine running quietly at idle.
2. A mechanism for regulating the speed at which an engine runs at rest: set the idle higher to keep the motor from stalling.

[Middle English idel, from Old English īdel.]

i′dle·ness n.
i′dler (īd′lər) n.
i′dly adv.

idler

(ˈaɪdlə)
n
1. a person who idles
2. (General Engineering) another name for idle pulley, idle wheel
3. (Nautical Terms) nautical a ship's crew member, such as a carpenter, sailmaker, etc, whose duties do not include standing regular watches
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.idler - person who does no workidler - person who does no work; "a lazy bum"
nonworker - a person who does nothing
clock watcher - a worker preoccupied with the arrival of quitting time
couch potato - an idler who spends much time on a couch (usually watching television)
dallier, dillydallier, dilly-dallier, lounger, mope - someone who wastes time
dawdler, laggard, lagger, trailer, poke, drone - someone who takes more time than necessary; someone who lags behind
daydreamer, woolgatherer - someone who indulges in idle or absentminded daydreaming
lazybones - a lazy person
lie-abed, slugabed - a person who stays in bed until a relatively late hour
loon - a worthless lazy fellow
shirker, slacker - a person who shirks his work or duty (especially one who tries to evade military service in wartime)
sluggard, slug - an idle slothful person
spiv - a person without employment who makes money by various dubious schemes; goes about smartly dressed and having a good time
sunbather - someone who basks in the sunshine in order to get a suntan
trifler - one who behaves lightly or not seriously
whittler - someone who whittles (usually as an idle pastime)

idler

noun loafer, lounger, piker (Austral. & N.Z. slang), drone, dodger, slouch (informal), shirker, slacker, couch potato (slang), sloth, dawdler, laggard, time-waster, layabout, deadbeat (informal, chiefly U.S. & Canad.), skiver (Brit. slang), malingerer, sluggard, bludger (Austral. & N.Z. informal), clock-watcher, slugabed, lazybones He resents being seen as a moneyed idler.

idler

noun
A self-indulgent person who spends time avoiding work or other useful activity:
Slang: slouch.
Translations
كَسول
lenoch
dovenlas
letingi, iîjuleysingi
avareaylaktembel kişi

idler

[ˈaɪdləʳ] Nocioso/a m/f, holgazán/ana m/f, vago/a m/f

idler

[ˈaɪdlər] n (= lazy person) → oisif/ive m/fidle time n [computer, machine] → temps m mort

idler

n
(Brit: = person not working) → Müßiggänger(in) m(f); (= lazy person)Faulenzer(in) m(f), → Faulpelz m
(Tech, = wheel) → Zwischenrad nt; (= pulley)Spannrolle f

idler

[ˈaɪdləʳ] nfannullone/a, sfaccendato/a

idle

(ˈaidl) adjective
1. not working; not in use. ships lying idle in the harbour.
2. lazy. He has work to do, but he's idle and just sits around.
3. having no effect or result. idle threats.
4. unnecessary; without good reason or foundation. idle fears; idle gossip.
verb
1. to be idle or do nothing. On holiday they just idled from morning till night.
2. of an engine etc, to run gently without doing any work. They kept the car engine idling while they checked their position with the map.
ˈidler noun
a lazy person.
ˈidleness noun
ˈidly adverb
idle away
to spend (time) doing nothing. idling the hours away.
References in classic literature ?
To listen to conversation about such things would mean to be bored, wherefore the idlers decree that such things are shop and must not be talked about.
It is no easy task to understand unfamiliar blood; I hate the reading idlers.
He folded me in his great strong arms, and he gave me a kiss which must certainly have been heard by the idlers waiting for the bride and bridegroom outside the church door.
The result was that when the new-comer left the hotel with the cicerone, a man detached himself from the rest of the idlers, and without having been seen by the traveller, and appearing to excite no attention from the guide, followed the stranger with as much skill as a Parisian police agent would have used.
That's the way these young idlers employ their long hours.
When he had disappeared under the shades of the porch, three or four idlers, who had followed the cavalcade to the castle, after pointing out the suspended birds to each other, dispersed with comments upon what they saw: and, when they were gone, the street, the place, and the court all remained deserted alike.
In summer time, its pumps suggest to thirsty idlers, springs cooler, and more sparkling, and deeper than other wells; and as they trace the spillings of full pitchers on the heated ground, they snuff the freshness, and, sighing, cast sad looks towards the Thames, and think of baths and boats, and saunter on, despondent.
Sometimes I rambled about from house to house, sure of receiving a cordial welcome wherever I went; or from grove to grove, and from one shady place to another, in company with Kory-Kory and Fayaway, and a rabble rout of merry young idlers.
Happily for herself, her neighbors on either side were no idlers.
Tom kept his ears open when idlers sauntered out of the court- room, but invariably heard distressing news -- the toils were closing more and more relentlessly around poor Potter.
By my faith, senor, hunting and amusements are more fit for idlers than for governors; what I intend to amuse myself with is playing all fours at Eastertime, and bowls on Sundays and holidays; for these huntings don't suit my condition or agree with my conscience.
Across the estuary, near where the whalers lay, was lying the sloop-yacht Idler.